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Author Topic: Another project a V 100 or better BR 212 of the German Federal Railways.  (Read 12672 times)
Design-HSB
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« on: March 31, 2020, 02:29:49 PM »

Yes, I am working on a further project, a standard track locomotive in 1:22.5 scale.



The locomotive housing is printed in one piece in 3 D in China.

Of course, there are many accessories missing, from which I make everything that is not available.



Like this fan grille, for example.



Lamp rings.



Front window frame with panes.



Side window frames with inner frames and panes.

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Regards Helmut
the journey is the goal
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Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2020, 04:37:41 PM »

A great project there Helmut.
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2020, 05:07:50 PM »

Wow! I don't think I've seen such a large printed piece before.
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2020, 10:08:54 PM »

I just knew you made the metal parts because they are so elegant. -- Russ
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Bernhard
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2020, 02:29:15 AM »

This seems to be an interesting project. I look forward to the continuation.

Bernhard
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2020, 06:46:49 AM »

A good start Helmut.  Where will this locomotive go once completed?
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2020, 08:10:43 AM »

Thats´ one hell of a 3D-print!
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Design-HSB
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2020, 06:19:22 AM »

A good start Helmut.  Where will this locomotive go once completed?

Bill, I have a Spur II modular system, which is equipped with 3 rail tracks for 45 and 64 mm track gauge.










« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 06:21:23 AM by Design-HSB » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2020, 06:35:17 AM »

Hier möchte ich die Fertigung der Lampenringe aus Aluminium zeigen.



Used for sample and glazed.



These lamp rings still need to be processed all after until they look like the pattern.

1. Remove adhesive residues and chips from milling.
2. Remove the ridge inside.
3. Remove the ridge from the outside.



Production of milled lamp rings from left to right.
So far, my milling machine has run for 10 minutes per lamp ring.
Unfortunately, aluminium milling only takes small steps and only with a lower feed.

After that, glue residues and chips must first be removed from the milling.

After that, deburring is made inside and the rest is removed outside.

Finally, the lamp ring is picked up again in the lathe and sanded and rounded on the outside.

While the set CNC machine is fortunately running without my presence, I have to change drills, sinkers and cutters and start the work steps. Finally, the manual rework then makes 2.5 minutes per lamp ring.



And this lamp ring is my favorite lamp ring, because this lamp ring is the last because now all lamp rings are ready.

We continue with the glass inserts and the reflector.
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« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2020, 02:12:06 PM »

Tedious and exacting work with outstanding results. -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2020, 12:21:15 AM »

Why do you need so many of those lamp rings?
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« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2020, 02:25:09 AM »

Russ, yes, hard work with precision.

Ray, the construction of this model locomotive is a group action and I have agreed in the group to manufacture the parts for all 20 models.
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Regards Helmut
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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2021, 07:31:12 AM »

I haven't reported here for a long time, the reason for this was my decision not to complete the kit. We are here in a forum for finescalerr and a lot of the plastic model is too rough for me.
I still have the brass model shown here, which unfortunately does not meet these requirements either.
So I'm going to build a brass model with an improved plastic structure.
The entire plastic chassis is completely eliminated. However, individual parts can be used from the brass chassis after repair.
So I will take up the report again here, especially as the model is a vehicle that I particularly like. I hope to be able to show that it is possible to improve things considerably.



Up in the frame my pattern milled under great difficulty from Vivak.
Below the tried lasered series production unfortunately with raised melting bead and therefore unfortunately not as desired.

Now I have precision acrylic glass, because it's better to mill like Vivak and try again.



With the lamps, this looks better, except that the clear discs cut with laser also have the bead at the edge. But the printed reflector works for this. This reflector fits a 6 volt micro bulb with connecting wires. The whole thing also fits into the opening in the V100 drilled with the step drill.



Luckily, the red lamp glasses can be used and that's what it looks like.
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« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2021, 02:45:43 PM »

After the windows and lamps I dealt with the fan and the fan grille.


The individual parts for the fan grille are separated from the etching plate.


The slats are rotated and erected around 90.


The 0.5 mm wires are indented and the combs of the teaching are inserted. For soldering everything is held together with brackets with the soldering I can start so in the middle.


109 soldering points later, the grid is soldered.


All the bars and the frame are separated, everything is cleaned.
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« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2021, 02:52:00 PM »

Then I started to make my V 100 ready to drive, because then I can test and implement many things like light and fan much more easily.



To protect against contamination and in the hope that this reduces the noise of the bevel gears, I want to encapsulate the gearbox. The first parts are already ready. The gearbox housing is based on the axle via ball bearings, which also needs to be rebuilt for this purpose.

The construction of my V 100 is progressing.


The gearbox housings are now ready. Each housing consists of 20 milling parts. 2 x M3, 8 x M2 and 16 x M1 screws the threads are all cut by hand, which has taken the longest time. I also paired pairs of plates with 14 x 1mm rivets.

In order to be able to rotate the new axes, I first need the axle bearings in the bogus brackets that should contain ball bearings.


I have a scrap V100. I only need to disassemble the old axle swings, which fortunately is easy thanks to cold soldering points. Then the hole for the ball bearing comes in and everything is cleaned, directed and properly soldered together. Axle swing number 1 of 8 is ready and works, now the remaining 7 pieces can follow.
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Regards Helmut
the journey is the goal
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