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Author Topic: Another sawmill  (Read 63003 times)
Hauk
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« Reply #60 on: January 29, 2010, 02:02:57 PM »

I don't need sunglasses for this photo! -- Russ

Hey, we´re making progress!

Regards, Håvard H.
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Regards, Hauk
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Hauk
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« Reply #61 on: May 15, 2010, 11:11:11 AM »



Hey, we´re making progress!

Regards, Håvard H.

Yes we are. Here are a couple of shots of the saw itself. Some NBWs, a drive belt and a cosmetic electric motor and we are almost there. The hardware that guides the cutting is still missing, but I will probably scratchbuild something loosely based on drawings and pictures.




 
After searching the scrapbox for a suitable drivewheel, I realised it would take less tie to make one from scratch. I guess making parts like that was why I got me a small lathe in the first place! Looks a bit crude this close up, but at normal viewing distance it is OK.

The sawmill had an apperance in a Norwegian Modelling magazine, so I threw together a little scenery for the occasion:



Since the reader of this forum is more sharpeyed than most, I probably do not need to mention that the last photo was taken before the saw got it latest details. The sawblade was just glued to bench temporarily. I felt the sawblade in silouette against the window adds a bit of interest to the picture.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2010, 11:16:26 AM by Hauk » Logged

Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

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marc_reusser
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« Reply #62 on: May 15, 2010, 11:24:42 PM »

Hauk,

Great to see you back posting and working on this. Coming along nicely. What did you use for the steel color on the shafts and the bearing-blocks?


Marc
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finescalerr
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« Reply #63 on: May 16, 2010, 12:00:56 AM »

Very clean work, Håvard. Don't wait so long before tackling the next step. -- Russ
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Hauk
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« Reply #64 on: May 16, 2010, 12:06:03 AM »

Hauk,

Great to see you back posting and working on this. Coming along nicely. What did you use for the steel color on the shafts and the bearing-blocks?


Marc

Thanks, Marc!
The brass parts were blackened with Birchwood Casey Brass Black. I buy this from an English online store, Eileens Emporium.http://www.eileensemporium.com.

By the way, when using blackening fluids the metal parts often goes black almost immidiately, but when I rinse the parts, most of the black comes off again.  
It seems to me that by diluting the solutions 1:1 with distilled water, you don´t get as much "soot" buildup, and a more durable finish. The process is somewhat slower, but I dont see that as a problem. Anyone else that dilutes theis blackening fluids?
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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Chuck Doan
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« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2010, 06:12:33 AM »

I agree, nice to some progress! I always use full strength blackening, and I often see the same loss after rinsing. Never thought of diluting, but I know that older stuff colors differently.
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« Reply #66 on: July 20, 2014, 01:42:19 AM »

I just re-read this thread as I remembered there were some discussion about my rust-painting efforts. It was a minor shock to see my first effort again! I remembered that I posted an image of some rather bright rusted siding, but not that it was almost fluorescent! Man, what was I thinking? This must be one of the greatest examples of wishful thinking in the history of scale modeling...

Anyway, the reason for reopening this thread is that I found some nice sawmills during my summer holiday. Here is a an example:



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Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #67 on: July 20, 2014, 06:28:35 AM »

Burchwood Casey Brass Black is available at any well stocked American gun store which also caters to those who repair and restore old guns.  I find that a quick dip in HCl followed by a rinse makes the brass black work quite well.
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« Reply #68 on: July 20, 2014, 11:33:48 AM »

If I saw rust like that on a model I would think the builder made a mistake! -- Russ
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Barney
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« Reply #69 on: July 20, 2014, 12:59:41 PM »

This is nice and its give me a few ideas for my next model - just keep it coming lovely workmanship.
Barney
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #70 on: July 20, 2014, 06:37:03 PM »

Wow, I don't think I've ever seen rust like that before. Almost looks like paint or something.
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« Reply #71 on: July 21, 2014, 06:12:39 AM »

If I saw rust like that on a model I would think the builder made a mistake! -- Russ

I totally understand that!

I showed my finished sawmill to a non-modelling friend, and he asked why I had painted the roof orange.

I am not claiming that my painted roof is that good, but it is in fact less brightly orange than many of the prototypes I have seen.



But those brightly orange roofs are seen close to the coast, and corrugated roofing in more inland towns rust to a much more brown/reddish color. My friend lives in an inland town, and brightly orange-colored corrugated roofs is not something he is used to see.

It it is true that modeling the prototypical but unusual can result in unbelievable models.
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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
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« Reply #72 on: July 21, 2014, 11:56:00 AM »

Your mill looks good! -- Russ
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #73 on: July 22, 2014, 10:33:51 AM »

The brass parts were blackened with Birchwood Casey Brass Black. It seems to me that by diluting the solutions 1:1 with distilled water, you don´t get as much "soot" buildup, and a more durable finish. The process is somewhat slower, but I dont see that as a problem.

I agree, the the steel color on the shafts looks perfect; I didn't thought they were made from brass!
Cool project too, congrats!

Peter
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« Reply #74 on: July 22, 2014, 10:53:23 PM »

Hauk,

concerning the roof you maybe could add some of the remaining zinc blotches as seen in prototype pictures. This would add some variety and maybe could make the coloring somewhat more "readable" to be rust. For the non modelers.
By the way that's an interesting prototype. Reduced to the minimum and a somewhat coarse built. It seems to be still in use?

Cheers,
Volker
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