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Author Topic: Another sawmill  (Read 62998 times)
marc_reusser
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« Reply #45 on: November 16, 2009, 11:24:59 PM »

Paul,

I think I would prefer "splining" or "biscuiting" the joints......almost seems easier than the Ambroid method Tongue Grin Grin Grin


M
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« Reply #46 on: November 17, 2009, 12:34:18 AM »

Håvard , the "scientific" name for yellow carpenter's glue is "aliphatic resin" if that helps. As for joints, Paul and our friend, Richard Christ, often have pinned and glued parts together for strength. -- Russ
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #47 on: November 17, 2009, 06:08:10 PM »

I think I would prefer "splining" or "biscuiting" the joints......almost seems easier than the Ambroid method Tongue Grin Grin Grin
M

Riiiightt.... I would use biscuits but can't find a biscuit jointer small enough... Grin Grin Grin Half-blind dovetail joints are another possibility.... Wink

I forgot to mention in that post that I'm referring to the original Ambroid Liquid Cement. It's been around for decades, something of a mainstay with the flying model plane crowd (the planes, not the crowd that is). When used with this technique it's virtually invisible, unless you're really ham-fisted, quite strong and waterproof, which can be a real plus if you're going to be following up your assembly with a barrage of water based stains or washes. Any excess cement outside the joint area can be quickly removed with a little Acetone.

Paul
« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 07:07:08 PM by Roughboy » Logged
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #48 on: November 17, 2009, 07:04:25 PM »

Håvard , the "scientific" name for yellow carpenter's glue is "aliphatic resin" if that helps. As for joints, Paul and our friend, Richard Christ, often have pinned and glued parts together for strength. -- Russ
That's right Russ. There are several Aliphatic Resin or Polyaliphatic Resin Polymer glues on the market. Titebond is one of the more popular brands in this country. You just need to be certain you're getting one that is waterproof if any water-based stains or washes are going to be applied following assembly. Some of these glues are only water-resistant. Still, even these, will not form a strong lasting butt joint without an additional mechanical connection, be that joinery or pinning. Pinning is especially useful in situations such as bridge, trestle, turntable construction where the large timbers were bolted together on the prototype. It's a fairly simple matter to use brass or phosphor bronze pins in league with NBW castings or miniature nuts to replicate the prototype bolts while adding structural strength to the assembly.

Paul
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« Reply #49 on: November 22, 2009, 11:30:13 AM »

Not much progress, but I managed to finish the saw table during the weekend.



I am beginning to consider my disk sander to be my most important tool. It is impossible to get good angles on stripwood any other way than to sand them to the exact angle. I cut the stripwood til approximately the correct lengt & angle using and old NWSL chopper.

We had a discussion earlier about the quality of different stripwood brands, and I expressed that I was happy with my Kappler wood.  But I am getting  some doubts. See the closeup on the saw table. There are some "leopard spots" that are not due to sloppy staining, but they pop right out after staining with  silverwood. Annoying. If the Mt. Albert Lumber does not have this problem, I will consider a switch.



The problem seems to be that there is some variation in the wood, in lack of a better word:

You can see it on this close-up of some untreated pieces:



The piece second from the left is worst affected.

Paul, maybe you can give a better explanation of what I am talking about?

But any way, I am happy to have finished the saw table.
Next up is finsihing the walls of the building.

Regards, Håvard H

PS: Anyone know what is the correct solvent for Silverwood stain?
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Regards, Hauk
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #50 on: November 22, 2009, 04:05:16 PM »

Wow... that's some of the nastiest looking raw basswood I've seen in ages... Shocked It's no wonder you're having problems staining. Those leopard spots are either the ends of grain fibres, tannin deposits or a combination of both. It would appear that the stock in your photo was cut on a bias (rift sawn) or from very gnarly stock with interlocking grain. The  tannin deposits are again an indicator of poor stock (at least for this purpose). Since we know that end grain absorbs more liquid along its fibres and channels (referring to the gluing method post), the same problem occurs with staining. The ends of the fibres draw in more stain than the surrounding face grain areas and appear darker. Tannin deposits can react in a similar manner depending upon the chemical makeup of the stain. There is really no solution for this as far as staining is concerned, unless you're trying to achieve a very dark color, in which case the spots ultimately blend in to the surrounding wood. Wood like you've shown in the stock photo is best used when applying a painted finish rather than a stain. Your saw table looks quite impressive. I expect when completed and detailed, the leopard spots will not be so visible. You might also be able to disguise them with future weathering, saw dust and so on.

The primary medium in Silverwood is Isopropyl Alcohol. Either that or denatured alcohol will dilute it, though it's very dilute to start with. MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) will remove some of the product if you have an area that's too dark, but not all of it as Silverwood is a penetrating stain.

Paul
« Last Edit: November 22, 2009, 04:37:19 PM by Roughboy » Logged
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #51 on: November 22, 2009, 04:35:04 PM »

Havard:

Do you have the ability to cut your own stripwood? If so you might want to consider other woods: Lime (often thought of as the European equivalent of Basswood), Holly, Pear (my personal choice) or Cherry (I believe Jacq used Cherry on his sawmill). Boxwood is another excellent wood, very dense, hard with no visible grain, machines to precise dimensions like metal, but it is extremely difficult to stain. None of these are available in scale stripwood sizes so you would have to cut your own.

Paul
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John McGuyer
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« Reply #52 on: November 28, 2009, 03:35:25 PM »

An old model airplane building trick with aliphatic resin. Glue the joint with the resin and then tack it with CA. The CA will hold the structure while the resin dries. Elaborate frames can be made by tacking them together with CA then pick them up and brush the resin around the joints with an appropriate sized brush.

John
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Hauk
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« Reply #53 on: January 28, 2010, 10:21:12 AM »

Some more progress, but I am almost hesitant to post this...
I know some of you have a problem with orange rust, but hey, what can a poor boy do when he lives in an area where corrugateted siding turns into a fiercly orange rust color?

So here goes:




In the foreground my work, In the background, the family barn.

My siding should be a tad more red, but they are close enough.

Here is a small tutorial:

1. First, the Raw Builders In Scale siding was primed with Humbrol Matt Black (All other paints are Vallejo, I used Humbrol for primer as I hope it has a bit more "bite")

2. Airbrushed the siding with an even coating of Vallejo 034 Burnt Cadmium Red.

3.Mixed up a color based on 027 Orange Red with some 033 Yellowish Rust (and a few drops of a dark brown Vallejo color). Turned the air pressure down to around 0,5 bar to get a spattering coverage. Tried to hit the siding from the side, so that he tops of the corrugations received more paint than the bottoms

4. Repeated step 3, this time with  022 Light Orange as a base. Thats it.

I feel that I am on to something regarding the texture. Here is a close up that shows why I feel the "spattering" approach is the way to go:


(This picture is from another roof than the one above, I just included it fo the texture)

I might try to tone down the color a bit, maybe I should try a filter or two.

Regards, Håvard H

(Ok Marc, you can open your eyes, the post is finished! Wink )
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Regards, Hauk
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« Reply #54 on: January 28, 2010, 12:59:44 PM »

I need sunglasses. -- Russ
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« Reply #55 on: January 28, 2010, 02:28:26 PM »

   Håvard,

 
Quote
I know some of you have a problem with orange rust, but hey, what can a poor boy do when he lives in an area where corrugateted siding turns into a fiercly orange rust color?

  I see Photoshop reached Norway............... Grin Grin 

  Humbrol no 1 primer is a good start to get a faded not corroded galvanised color.

  I am surprised that the norwegian climate has such an even corrosion effect on galvanised material. The area around Bergen is well known in the car industry for the severe corrosion effects on various materials, but there the most materials turned a very light grey due to the galvanic action of the zinc in the alloys.

 Jacq

 

 
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« Reply #56 on: January 28, 2010, 02:35:27 PM »

I call that grain "speckle grain". I don't use pieces with it if the speckeled side shows for the very reason you see. Mt. Albert wood occasionally has some in each bag, but mostly not. It has been something to watch for from all basswood suppliers over the years. I find Midwest has the least problems with it, but they don't have the largest selection of O scale wood, so you have to use fractional sizes or cut your own from sheets (blah).
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« Reply #57 on: January 28, 2010, 02:39:47 PM »


  I see Photoshop reached Norway............... Grin Grin 


Here is another one:


Scouts honour, I have only used PS for getting the colours as neutral as possible!

Regards, Håvard
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« Reply #58 on: January 29, 2010, 12:52:55 PM »

Looks like my rust has left most people speechless, probably for all the wrong reasons!
But I really don´t feel it looks so extreme when put in context (the finished building):





When the scenery is finished I will probably  give the roof a very light dusting with the basic earth color in the scene.

Regards, Håvard H
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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
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« Reply #59 on: January 29, 2010, 01:44:55 PM »

I don't need sunglasses for this photo! -- Russ
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