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Rollwagen no. 28 of the Plettenberger Kleinbahn in 1/22.5 scale

Started by Hydrostat, February 16, 2014, 12:25:25 PM

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Ray Dunakin

If the goal is to make it look like wood which has been previously painted, perhaps many times, and has had most of the paint worn off, then my choice is the one on the right.

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin's World

Chuck Doan

All have merit. The far right one seems closest, at least as can be seen in photos.
"They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details." -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/

lab-dad

To me I "think" if my bum has sat on and off that wood for some time it should be quite smooth and almost polished. Denim(jeans) over time would impart quite a shine to the wood.

Now if it has been sitting idle for a number of years then the one on the right.
With may be some moss on the sides <grin>

-Marty

Bill Gill

Not exactly the same, but here is a painted wooden seat that saw a lot of sitting:  http://www.amazon.com/Antique-Milking-Stool-Painted-Primitive/dp/B00DWH0AOO

I tend to agree with Marty, unless the seat hadn't be used for some time, the top surface would be somewhat polished - not handrubbed, but even if the grain were raised from the weather, the highest layers would still be buffed and shiny from constant use, not like garden furniture which typical saw only occasional use.

Hydrostat

Thank you all for your hints! Other than at a feldbahn locomotive seat, which for sure shows an appearance like Marty and Bill suggested, the Rollwagen were standing a lot of time on any factory yard with a wagon on top of them or 'naked' in the exchange yard. So I think smoothing the surface a bit more before painting may be the way. Apart from that to me the right one looks closest to the estimated appearance.

I finally dared to solder the bogies. I was very afraid of warping parts as the core is very thick (7 mm) and the covers are quite thin (0.5 mm) and I'm very happy that it worked that good without any warpage. And I added the holder for the brake rod.











Firts I fix all 16 bearing holes with stainless steel screws, which are painted with an Edding to avoid solder sticking to them. I fix the sandwich to an aluminum section with longitudinal holes so the soldered covers with their screw imitations can't fall off. By chance the stainless steel screw heads protrude the same length as the imitations do. I use a flambé torch to heaten the sandwich up, making continuous movements, until the solder starts flowing. The massive core spreads heat very good. I cover the parts before assembling with solder fluid. The solder injects over the complete area although the parts are screwed tightly. I start with some solder depots and add the solder wire until a fillet appears. I have to turn the part twice to give solder to all positions. The already soldered small parts at the fronts don't come off because they are sitting tight in the milled gaps.








Cheers,
Volker
I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.

finescalerr


Ray Dunakin

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin's World


lab-dad

Looks fantastic!

??? The aluminum piece; is it from something else or did you make it?
Looks like a very useful tool!
-Marty

Hydrostat

Thanks Russ, Ray, Bill and Marty!

Quote from: lab-dad on May 15, 2015, 04:40:30 AM
??? The aluminum piece; is it from something else or did you make it?
Looks like a very useful tool!
-Marty

This is usual 'perforated web aluminum plate' (translation word by word from german, didn't find an english translation :P). I found it in the residue box of a shop in town: http://www.diessnergmbh.de/default.html (Kim knows the shop ;D). I think it's used for vent hole covers in houses or so. You're right, it's very handy for soldering and doesn't dissipate heat too much.

Volker
I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.

Hydrostat

First parts of the braking system:











The hangers are 0.8 mm thick. Frithjof milled them from a 1 mm plate, taking away 2/10th and then milling shape and holes. One can see this at the surface. The prototypical noses prevent the brake shoes from flapping down and so they do at the model.




The bolts are made from 1.4 mm rivets with the Dremel and a file.





Brake shoes are made in FUD at Shapeways. They need to be from an isolating material to prevent short circuits via the braking system.





Cheers,
Volker
I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.

Ray Dunakin

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin's World

finescalerr


Hydrostat

Hi,

the covers for the binder pendulums found their place at the bogies. Meanwhile I found a reasonable way to solder the bogies lot. The upper and lower plates have slots for the vertical front parts, which again have slots for the brake system brackets and so on. This way I'm able to premount all parts and then solder them, starting wih the both front sides. The additional detailing on the upper plate follows in a next step, again using the flambé torch.




I cover all areas with an edding, which should not receive solder; neither soldering fluid nor solder stick to it.





Bogie with covers:





Mounting the frame means to tighten hundreds of M 0.8 screws. I used a piece of wood and some harder foam to keep them aligned for assembling washers and nuts.





The working braking system requires a lot of washers and splints. I didn't want to bore more than 250 0.5 mm holes into 1.4 mm pins, but found another solution, which may work as cast parts.





I reduced the standardizes, wrong diameter washers to 2.1 and 2.7 mm diameter with the Dremel.








The self filed splints are brazed to them. This allows to solder the small parts to the casting tree (is this the right english word :P?).








I made different executions of the bent splints.





So those parts later on only need to be soldered to the pins which for sure is much less effortful than drilling all the holes and filing all the splints. Hole diameter is 1.5 mm. After casting they still should fit to the 1.4 mm bolts.


Cheers,
Volker
I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.

finescalerr