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Author Topic: Feldbahnmodule with ship  (Read 257970 times)
Lawton Maner
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« Reply #510 on: March 07, 2021, 11:07:44 AM »

     You have challenged me to try to replicate rough sawn timber.  I will probably try it with Crepe Myrtle as it is straight in the sizes I need.
     You need to throw the first attempt away (you can send the wood to me) and start over.  With all of the work you are doing I would expect that the braces would be made with mortise and tenon joints not butt joints.  Just teasing!!!
     Save the slab wood you cut off and use it to create a shed by a back woods shack. 
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finescalerr
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« Reply #511 on: March 07, 2021, 02:30:16 PM »

I like this project. -- Russ
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Barney
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« Reply #512 on: March 07, 2021, 04:14:23 PM »

very nice - and well thought out
Barney
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WP Rayner
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« Reply #513 on: March 08, 2021, 04:00:21 PM »

Very nice framing... it's a pleasure to see some proper half-lap joints. The remaining bark here and there is a nice touch, very effective.
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Paul

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fspg2
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« Reply #514 on: March 12, 2021, 08:57:44 AM »

Thanks for your approval

@ Lawton
Quote
Save the slab wood you cut off and use it to create a shed by a back woods shack. 
Yes that is a good idea!


A few adjustments were made.

So I sawed continuous frames from hazelnut wood. If necessary, these will get scratched overlays.

The individual wooden parts for the back and front wall were glued with a little wood glue in the teaching. Then 0.8mm holes for the "wooden nails" were drilled in the same setting.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_77 (fspg2)



A casual rehearsal gives an idea of the shed.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_78 (fspg2)




Dreh-Schiebebuehne_79 (fspg2)



The rafters were rounded at the front. For this purpose, the individual slats were placed in a small gauge and processed with a 1.0mm milling cutter.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_80 (fspg2)

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Frithjof
finescalerr
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« Reply #515 on: March 12, 2021, 02:36:22 PM »

Beautiful work. -- Russ
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Bernhard
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« Reply #516 on: March 12, 2021, 04:12:28 PM »

I agree with Paul, the connection of the beams is perfect. Likewise the wooden nails.

Bernhard
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #517 on: March 12, 2021, 10:00:11 PM »

Interesting work.  Take a look at a site which discusses timber framing.  The wooden pegs pin the joints together so that no metal is needed in assembly. 

Recently on the BBC's news site there were a pair of pictures of a shipwreck discovered off the east coast of England where the hull was held together with wood pegs.  Estimated to be over 200 years old and still being held together.
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #518 on: March 13, 2021, 12:17:26 AM »

Looks great so far!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Barney
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« Reply #519 on: March 13, 2021, 04:09:18 PM »

Fantastic - looks great
Barney
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fspg2
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« Reply #520 on: March 14, 2021, 10:56:48 AM »

Corrugated iron is provided for the roof.

Marcel had made these parts himself out of mustard tin sheet about three years ago: klick


I have planned 0.1mm thick Copper sheet from the roll.


This was cut into 72.0mm x 50.0mm pieces and burned out with the flame.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_86 (fspg2)



Dreh-Schiebebuehne_87 (fspg2)



Some time ago there was still that Fiskars crimper, which seems to be sold out everywhere at the moment!


These waves generated are 2.5mm in size - but for the replica of an 80mm prototype wave it should be 3.55mm here.


So I milled grooves 1.5mm deep in two HPL panels with a 3.5mm ball end mill. The distance to each other is 5.6mm.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_91 (fspg2)


I glued 3.4mm thick wooden sticks into these grooves with superglue.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_82 (fspg2)



The copper sheet will be pressed with the help of these two stamping plates.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_81 (fspg2)



After the first wave has been pressed, only the next one comes in turn. So the sheet metal still has enough reserve to expand. Pressing all the shafts at the same time does not produce a convincing result.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_88 (fspg2)



The raised edge is used to align the copper plate at right angles when pressing the first shaft.


Dreh-Schiebebuehne_85 (fspg2)



Dreh-Schiebebuehne_83 (fspg2)



Dreh-Schiebebuehne_89 (fspg2)



Dreh-Schiebebuehne_90 (fspg2)

« Last Edit: March 14, 2021, 12:34:54 PM by fspg2 » Logged

Frithjof
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« Reply #521 on: March 14, 2021, 04:12:01 PM »

Some guys locally here 3d printed their own crimping rollers for corrugated iron.

Probably not a tool that's going to last too long, but certainly good enough for 1 or 2 projects and easy to make/remake.
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Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
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finescalerr
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« Reply #522 on: March 14, 2021, 04:42:25 PM »

Your corrugated panels turned out perfectly.

I wonder how long a 3-d printed press or roller would work for corrugating cardstock.

Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #523 on: March 14, 2021, 11:59:21 PM »

That turned out nice.
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Lawrence@NZFinescale
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« Reply #524 on: March 15, 2021, 02:01:41 PM »

Your corrugated panels turned out perfectly.

I wonder how long a 3-d printed press or roller would work for corrugating cardstock.

Russ

Really well I imagine.  Despite doing a lot of 3d printed models, I feel one of the best uses for the technology is jigs, fixtures and tooling.  Such things are quick to do.
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Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
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