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Author Topic: Blackening / darkening aluminum??  (Read 41314 times)
lab-dad
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« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2012, 05:48:19 AM »

OOOHHH!!!!
I like those ideas Dallas!
Going ot get some of that stuff and give it a try!
Thanks!
-Marty
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     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Malachi Constant
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« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2012, 02:09:27 PM »

Couple of notes on the glaze medium:

-- Used in THIN layers, it dries nice & flat.
-- It takes MUCH longer to dry than ordinary thinned or un-thinned acrylics and even longer to actually "cure" (set)
-- If you go too heavy, the glaze will take on a gloss

So:  go easy ... allow ample drying/curing time (I'll usually allow overnight) ... and resist the urge to mess with it before set.

If you screw up, go too heavy & get a bit of gloss (which I still do occasionally) ... let it fully set, then a couple light coats of Tamiya TS-80 Clear Flat spray will kill the gloss.  (And, in general the TS-80 beats the crap out of Testor's dullcoat ... but that might just be my very biased opinion!)

Cheers,
Dallas
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-- Dallas Mallerich  (Just a freakin' newbie who stumbled into the place)
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searoom
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« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2012, 03:18:45 PM »

Urine has been a traditional non-ferrous metal patina for centuries.

 Grin
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W.P. Rayner
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« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2012, 08:27:51 PM »

Horse pee will blacken oak shavings , something to do with the ammonia in the pee . Though I suspect you will have to have some pretty potent pee to blacken aluminium .

  Do you want me to send you a pint or two of horse pee to have a bit of an experiment ? ! ? Or is your own toxic enough ?

   Nick

A video clinic on this process would be most welcome Nick, especially the part where you convince the horse to pee into a cup....  Grin Grin

Paul
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finescalerr
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« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2012, 01:44:28 AM »

I think some of you need to go stand in the corner .... -- ssuR
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shropshire lad
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« Reply #20 on: October 30, 2012, 02:31:07 AM »

Horse pee will blacken oak shavings , something to do with the ammonia in the pee . Though I suspect you will have to have some pretty potent pee to blacken aluminium .

  Do you want me to send you a pint or two of horse pee to have a bit of an experiment ? ! ? Or is your own toxic enough ?

   Nick

A video clinic on this process would be most welcome Nick, especially the part where you convince the horse to pee into a cup....  Grin Grin

Paul

    Er , nothing smaller than a two gallon bucket would be suitable . I'll get right onto it ... once I've finished my sojourn in the corner .

    Nick
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2012, 04:34:23 AM »

Geez...do I have to do all the heavy lifting.

Here you go Paul.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKwX5V9eZ-g&feature=youtube_gdata_player
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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2012, 04:52:16 AM »

Marc,

Your attention to detail sometimes leaves me completely gobsmaked  Shocked Roll Eyes
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Gordon
W.P. Rayner
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« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2012, 07:56:27 PM »

Geez...do I have to do all the heavy lifting.

Here you go Paul.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKwX5V9eZ-g&feature=youtube_gdata_player

You know, this just proves that there are too many people in this world with video cameras and too much free time on their hands...

Paul
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2012, 08:47:21 PM »

White Oak + Ammonia = Fumed Oak.  Think about the Stickley furniture from the late nineteenth century.  In the woodworking industry, the effect is done by placing the completed piece of furniture in an airtight box and exposing it to ammonia fumes for up to 24 hours.  At the end, when the piece comes out of the box, it is a greyish colour.  Rubbing a coat of wood finishing oil on the piece brings out the rich almost black colour associated with Stickley.  Fuming cherry will make pale pink new cherry timbers look as they have over ten years of patina on them over night.

I once fumed an entire room of white oak bookcases and paneling because after the client saw the finished room. he wanted it a bit darker.  We placed trays of blueprint developing grade ammonia in the room and checked it every other hour until the desired colour was reached.  Since there was a lacquer finish on all of the wood the change took several days.  BTW, don't try it at home, because that much ammonia in a closed space can KILL.
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Tom McInerney
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« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2013, 10:12:56 AM »

Went to a clinic last year at the Craftsman Expo and Brett buffs his blacken it back off with a wire brush to get the color he wants. Tom
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