Westlake Publishing Forums
May 26, 2022, 10:17:26 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 6
  Print  
Author Topic: Another sawmill  (Read 66219 times)
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1031



WWW
« on: November 02, 2009, 03:24:12 PM »

Not in the league of certain projects here on the forum, but here is my sawmill project anyway:



Its part of a pretty large diorama/testtrack


The project was started before discovering the famous Silverwood stain, so all wood is stained using A-west-Weather-it straight from the bottle.
No further weathering yet, suggestions for how to proceed is much welcomed!


Next step is to build the roof. Subroof made of wood, then corrugated aluminium roofing. Good tutorials for painting corrugated siding wanted!



Even if the protoype was small, it was served by rail. I really like the simple timber loading dock. No logs longer than 24´need apply!



Blades for the saw. Chemical blackening, then polished with ground pencil graphite. Need a bit more shine as the model will represent an operating mill. But research has shown that this type of sawmills have pretty dark blades, even if they are still in operation. Suggestions for getting a bit lighter and shinier finish, anyone?

A couple of prototype shots:





 I am taking some liberties with the prototype, I want a rusty roof instead the wooden roofing, and I will probably use an stationary steam engine to power the saw. My model is going to be set in the thirties, so the prototype´s electric motor is not very appropriate.

Regards, Håvard H


PS:
Don´t postphone taking all the pictures and measurements you need! I came back for some more pictures and measurments, an this is what I found:



This picture is taken from almost the exact same spot as the exterior shot above.
Grab that camera and yardstick *now*!


Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2604



WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2009, 03:33:34 PM »

The original CHB sawmill kits came with steel blades. I chucked them up in my Dremel tool and sanded them while spinning to get a circular marking. Then a coat of clear, since they would rust if left untreated. I thought they looked rather good!
Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
mobilgas
Guest
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2009, 03:42:05 PM »

Havard,   looks like you got a good start on this project....I really like the way you did the road and the way the hill's  look    Grin  Craig
Logged
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1031



WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2009, 03:54:49 PM »

Havard,   looks like you got a good start on this project....I really like the way you did the road and the way the hill's  look    Grin  Craig

Thanks!
The diorama has just sort of grown without no real planning. I threw it together when I needed a testrack in a hurry when I reached the testrunning stage for my Boxcab electric.

I had some vague vision in my head based on the prototype location for the mill, but I never checked to see if things would actually fit.
So there is a tad of accidental forced perspective in the scene. The road in the background is somewhat narrow. At least for pictures, I think it could work to use S-scale vehicles  on the road on the far side of the tracks.

I think the composition with the road disappearing into the background looks promesing.
Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Ken Hamilton
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 667



« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2009, 04:42:35 PM »

Looks like a good start to me, too.
We'll all be watching this one, Havard.
Good luck.
Logged

Mr Potato Head
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 545



« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2009, 06:38:02 PM »

I spent a two week vacation in the Olympic Peninsula looking for a prototype sawmill and on the last day of my trip at sunset I found it. I took as many bad photos as possible, with that stuff called “film” this was about twenty years ago. I have them and can scan them in for you, if you would like? It was a very small local mill with some drying sheds and a beautiful log pond parallel to the Puget Sound. I will find them and post one.
Gil
Logged

Gil Flores
In exile in Boise Idaho
NORCALLOGGER
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 453


« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2009, 06:51:43 PM »

HAUK,
Great project, I love small sawmills, especially circle mills.
Your comment about dark blade metal in a running mill is a little perplexing.
any Circle blades I have seen running polish up in a hurry when sawing logs.
Perhaps a different metal alloy? 
Attached is a couple shots of a double circle mill ( all steam power by the way)


The one picture shows the lower blade being run and the upper blade static and covered with sap and saw dust thrown up by the running blade.

The other picture shows the upper blade being put into operation (log size) and starting to polish up.

Even though the saw teeth are wider than the blade the sawdust spilling from the tooth gullets into the cut acts as a polishing agent and soon buffs off the rust and tarnish.

Later
Rick Marty







* circlesaw1.jpg (36.97 KB, 448x336 - viewed 997 times.)

* circlesaw2.JPG (35.15 KB, 448x336 - viewed 1043 times.)
Logged
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4651



WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2009, 08:53:16 PM »

Nice looking project! I agree with you about documenting prototypes before they vanish! I see it happen too often. A shame that your old mill is gone, it was a beauty.

I'm surprised at the size of the teeth on those circular saw blades -- I never realized they were so huge!


 
Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin’s World
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1031



WWW
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2009, 11:24:35 PM »

HAUK,
Great project, I love small sawmills, especially circle mills.
Your comment about dark blade metal in a running mill is a little perplexing.
any Circle blades I have seen running polish up in a hurry when sawing logs.
Perhaps a different metal alloy? 
Attached is a couple shots of a double circle mill ( all steam power by the way)

I might have underestimated the length of inactivity between cutting sessions. What I have been researching is what we in Norway call "Farm Sawmills" as opposed to commercial sawmills. These small saws can probably sit idle for months between cutting any wood, and I guess that is plenty of time for the blades to go dull. Many of these saws were crude affairs with little protection from the elements.

You cant get more basic than this one placed in a mountain reigion here in Norway:


But back to your first comment, I do think my blades needs quite some more shine.

Regards, Håvard H
Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6324


« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2009, 12:39:52 AM »

Håvard, you'll get no criticism from me. Everything on the diorama looks outstanding from the meticulous construction of every element to the graceful track layout to the attention to every detail so far. Thanks for posting. -- Russ
Logged
TRAINS1941
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1449


« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2009, 04:09:07 AM »

Havard

Very nice diorama really looking forward as you move forward with this.  Samills you just have to love them big or small.

Jerry
Logged

Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2090



« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2009, 04:34:39 AM »

Lovely little mill!
Looking forward to seeing completed.
I am with Chuck, spin the blades to polish some "lines" in it.
-Marty
Logged

Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1031



WWW
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2009, 04:50:48 AM »

Håvard, you'll get no criticism from me. Everything on the diorama looks outstanding from the meticulous construction of every element to the graceful track layout to the attention to every detail so far. Thanks for posting. -- Russ

It´s not like I want my work ripped apart, but I do not only post here to seek recognition but also to get constructive comments.
I am a grown boy, I can take a certain level of  flak! Hell, I work as an architect, I am used to my work beeing torn apart in public.

One of the reasons I post to no other international BB than WPF is that this is the only place I have found where you can get criticism, and still feel that your contributions are welcome.

Russ, I sincerely appreciate your efforts to make people feel welcome at your place, but there is always room for improvement, and sometimes we need help to see it!

Regards, Håvard H



Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Ken Hamilton
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 667



« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2009, 05:09:04 AM »

Well said, Havard.
Sometimes we hesitate offering constructive criticism for fear of how it will be interpreted, but most
of us here look forward to constructive comments that will ultimiately turn us into better builders.
Logged

Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1031



WWW
« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2009, 05:36:42 AM »

Lovely little mill!
Looking forward to seeing completed.
I am with Chuck, spin the blades to polish some "lines" in it.
-Marty

Yes, I am definitively going to try that.
Here is a closeup of one of the blades in the "open" sawmill I showed above:



Not as dull as my first efforts, but neither a shiny chrome finish!
Suprisingly many shades of color  in that blade by the way.

Regards, Håvard H
Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 6
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!