Westlake Publishing Forums
November 28, 2021, 05:12:26 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Provider for valves, faucets and so on 1-24 scale?  (Read 3902 times)
Hydrostat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 846



WWW
« on: January 03, 2021, 03:56:40 AM »

Hello gentlemen with my best wishes for the very young year,

I'm looking for some interior details like faucets, smaller globe valves, pipeline construction details and manometers in 1-24 or G scale. Well, of course in 1-22.5 scale, but usually scale things are a bit too large, so maybe even some 1-32 stuff may suffice  Grin. I know German provider https://www.modell-werkstatt.de with items like https://www.modell-werkstatt.de/wasserhahn or https://www.modell-werkstatt.de/eckventil-klein, but this looks a bit coarse to me.  Any suggestions?

Cheers,
Volker
Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4557



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2021, 11:26:11 PM »

Trackside Details has some nice looking brass globe valves, faucets, and other plumbing bits:

http://www.tracksidedetails.com/index.php

These parts are scattered through their catalog of loco details so you'll need to scroll through it to see them all.

Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin’s World
Barney
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 441


« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2021, 01:58:54 PM »

Try these ones www.lgminiatures.co.uk   and www.wisemancastings.com  both cater for the smaller scales but they both do some larger valves and pipe bits
Barney
Logged
Barney
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 441


« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2021, 02:03:05 PM »

apologies should be Wiseman Castings USA   www.wisemanmodelservices
Logged
Barney
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 441


« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2021, 02:06:40 PM »

Wrong again - its something to do with age and the cold weather !!
try again   wisemanmodelservices.com
Logged
Hydrostat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 846



WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2021, 12:46:45 AM »

Thanks a lot, Ray and Barney!

Tracksidedetails seems to be the same as the ones i found at Modeellwerkstatt. Wisemanmodelservices has some interesting stuff, but nothing coming close enough for my purposes. Okay, back to the bench  Wink

Cheers,
Volker
Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Lawrence@NZFinescale
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 43



WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2021, 11:49:51 PM »

First post here...

Details like this are becoming very easy to get (in principle at least).

Draw, print (and cast if you want metal).  A USD350 printer will do a great job, so I suggest using a local supplier rather than a big name.

Obviously bespoke castings and prints are more expensive than stock castings, but there are a number of factors that can make them attractive and viable.

Attached are in 9mm:ft.  A custom job, but as I had the digital model in 1:64 no problem to do.


* _HLB5622.jpg (134.21 KB, 946x1080 - viewed 220 times.)

* _HLB5619.jpg (123.24 KB, 1378x809 - viewed 225 times.)
Logged

Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
nzfinescale.com
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6165


« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2021, 02:39:22 AM »

What printer would you recommend, Lawrence? Did you use a $350 printer to create the master for that beautiful casting? Had you used the original printed resin piece instead of the casting would it have been durable enough? And do you know people outside of New Zealand who might produce parts for forum members? The subject of your first post someday soon will be at the heart of sophisticated scratchbuilding. -- Russ
Logged
Hauk
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1014



WWW
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2021, 04:01:02 AM »

First post here...

Details like this are becoming very easy to get (in principle at least).

Draw, print (and cast if you want metal).  A USD350 printer will do a great job, so I suggest using a local supplier rather than a big name.

Obviously bespoke castings and prints are more expensive than stock castings, but there are a number of factors that can make them attractive and viable.

Attached are in 9mm:ft.  A custom job, but as I had the digital model in 1:64 no problem to do.

Looks really good! Like Russ, I am very interested in what type of 3D-printer you are using.


Logged

Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
Lawrence@NZFinescale
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 43



WWW
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2021, 01:46:34 PM »

I've been 3D printing/casting for quite a few years, with quite a bit of development over that time obviously.  I've never done my own casting (I use a commercial house for that), but I've gone from outsourcing prints to doing my own patterns in resin, to sacrificial models for direct casting.

I'd rather not distract too much with specific equipment and materials as this stuff literally changes by the month and the principles are more relevant. In fact I'm in the process of updating my process (again). My current set up is quite limited and expensive compared to what you can get today. I have two printers at present.  An elderly DLP (at 42 micron) for castings and detail parts and a larger format monochrome LCD (50micron) for larger pieces.

For our purposes a monochrome LCD printer at 35 micron (ie around 30 voxels/mm) resolution can generate great 'waxes' for casting.  Such machines start at US$350 on sale, though shipping, import costs, ancilliaries and consumables will add a fair bit to that.  I have used much more expensive machines with far less satisfactory results. Like a lot of techniques it is not something best left in a corner for occasional use.  You really need to have a dedicated space and be printing often.  Somewhat like air-brushing, you CAN use it from time to time, but if you have a permanent arrangement you spend less time on set up and clean up.

As you might imagine, I have a lot to say in this area that will doubtless emerge in response to questions and over time rather than me writing a book straight off.  Suffice it to say the principles are simple, but realisation is a bit more involved.

On the question of resin v brass: it depends.  Resins vary a lot, but it isn't hard to find one that is strong, yet not too brittle.  One thing I do is 1 piece resin backheads (1:64 NZR K class in the pic).  Resin is ideal for these as  they are protected in the cab.  Castable resins do not print as well (fine wires are not as strong) so for something like a wire-spoked wheel you are stuck with resin.  I like building brass models using solder, so sometimes it is just a personal choice.  The bottom line though is that you can print details that are so fine that they have very little strength if left in resin.  But resin can be prety tough. The tree is around 200mm (8") high with twigs printed nominally 0.2mm.  This is plenty robust enough - better than natural materials of similar size.


* _HLB5595-sml.jpg (215.84 KB, 679x679 - viewed 234 times.)

* _HLB6272-sml.jpg (132.93 KB, 710x1116 - viewed 221 times.)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2021, 01:49:35 PM by Lawrence@NZFinescale » Logged

Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
nzfinescale.com
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6165


« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2021, 02:55:53 AM »

Okay, if I ever make a 3-D drawing of a backhead, you can print it. -- Russ
Logged
Les Tindall
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 342


« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2021, 03:39:03 AM »

That backhead is PHENOMENAL!
Les
Logged
Lawrence@NZFinescale
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 43



WWW
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2021, 01:01:58 PM »

Okay, if I ever make a 3-D drawing of a backhead, you can print it. -- Russ

 Smiley

Like anything, this stuff is incremental.  You start with something simple. That works, so you think 'I wonder...'.  Plenty of failures (aka learning experiences) along the way.  Then you see someone else's work and you think 'Gotta try that...' and the hobby moves forward.

Logged

Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
nzfinescale.com
Hydrostat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 846



WWW
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2021, 11:17:12 AM »

Like a lot of techniques it is not something best left in a corner for occasional use.  You really need to have a dedicated space and be printing often.

Hi, Lawrence, and welcome to the forum!

You nailed it. This is the reason why I didn't buy a printer and probably won't. My request ended up making my own drawings/data and have them brass casted, as long as the providers' available wall thicknesses correspond to scale. Everything else is going to be resin printed.

Cheers,
Volker
Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!