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Author Topic: Some old and new stuff from a new member.  (Read 126862 times)
Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2012, 11:45:44 AM »

Alexandre,

I like that , has a lot more subtlety and the colouring looks good to me ..... This is 1/20 scale ?

I am guessing that you are using a wire brush to emphasise the grain, it might be worth tying to either miss this step out ..... Just adding the grain with some light stokes of a scalpel blade or doing this but limiting the use of the wire brush to one or two relatively light strokes

All this from someone can't get near this look  Tongue

My question re the MaK groundwork was more to do with the grass, what did you use and how did you achieve the colour ?
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« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2012, 02:06:42 PM »

The second piece of wood is much closer to the mark. As with Chuck's work, each board is a model in itself. Satisfactory. -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2012, 02:36:19 PM »

I struggle with knot grain-I used to have an Kirigami knife somewhere; it might help get a nice curve to follow the knot. I also learned add the knots after staining the board to keep them from getting too dark.

« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 02:38:15 PM by Chuck Doan » Logged

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marc_reusser
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« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2012, 03:37:07 PM »

Alexandre,

Thanks for the info and new pic. I completely understand the "random" approach  Grin....

I use a drill slightly smaller in diameter than the knot, and pre-drill a hole. Makes it easier to push the knot in without deforming the wood around it.

I have also recently found that a fiberglass pencil gives a more subtle wood grain, and is easier a bit easier to steer around the knot, than a wire pencil.

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Alexandre
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« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2012, 04:41:19 PM »

Thanks a lot gentlemen for your very very useful comments.
Fiberglass pen and an origami knife are very clever ideas.

Gordon : I'm using a tamiya modeling saw. But you're right that's too rough for the scale. Using a drill still doesn't avoid board damage around the knot so I have to be more careful when doing them.
For the Ma.K groundwork, that's olvillas del mar, small egg-shaped stuff of dry grass and fibers I find on the mediterranean shores. Here it's mixed with RR modeling long grass, I can't remember the brand, as it's in a zipbag without any labels. They're airbrushed + enamel filters and washes. I may make some SBS pics, should be more clear.
 
Small update with concrete post and another board. Please let me now when you're bored of my experiments  Smiley



The concrete still needs some work.
A.

 
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2012, 09:44:45 PM »

Hey Alexandre,

You are not boring us in the least.....we love experiments,...keep them coming, as long as you can tolerate us nit-picking and giving our two-cents worh of commentary. Grin

Really like the texture on the broken areas of the concrete post (have been wanting to do one of these for a while). Can you explain how you made it?

Not knowing the setting and environment that the post will be in, I do feel that it is a bit too dark in color (at least overall), if it is just going to be an old concrete post.

I shot these in Switzerland a while back for reference, if they are of any interest/use:










Marc
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« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2012, 09:52:14 PM »

Real life "overscaled" wood graining  Grin Grin Grin

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M-Works
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Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2012, 04:02:09 PM »

beautiful detail
kind regards kim
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #23 on: December 13, 2012, 04:53:09 PM »

I'm with Marc, keep 'em coming, I like to see what you're up to.
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Alexandre
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« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2012, 04:25:09 AM »

Thanks a lot!
Marc, perfect reference pictures. I was more on the concrete texture and moss on this one, but yes, the color is no good.
This post is made of cork, textured with gesso. Damage is simply made like that. Easy way!  Smiley

I've played a bit with the brick molds from Diorama debris that just arrived home.
I've used cheap plaster of PAris, the one that I had ready at home, but the result is embarrassing.
I've cast em white, the coloring is done after, once dry. Colors are OK although far from perfect, but my plaster skills are 0.
3 batches, and only 6 or 7 usable bricks. My mix and pouring was full of air bubbles. Sometimes too thick, the other too thinned. Really need to practice on that.
But these molds are great! There's a new batch drying this time pre-colored with pigments.

I've also tried something I've not seen so often, wet bare wood that has been stored outside for few month only. It turns yellow-green-gray.
Well, there again, need improvement. For now it's still too yellow / too balsa.

I'm having way too much fun with this.  Smiley It could be time to think of a scene instead of toying with bits. That's nonetheless rewarding to see improvements while trying this or that. I think I've learned more in weathering this past week reading the forum, and experimenting, than in the past year of modelling.  Cheesy



Cheers,
Alexandre.
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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2012, 05:38:51 AM »

That beam looks pretty good to me Alexandre ..... think in some cases the green tinge you get comes from a wood preservative that is applied to wood that is to be used externally.

Keep up the experimentation , we are all learning ........ filed the use of cork for concrete away  Wink

Have you looked at Diorama Debris web site  www.dioramadebris.co.uk under  "tips & guides" their mix ratios I have found pretty accurate ..... for the small quantities we are talking about its worth while investing in some digital scales 
 
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Gordon
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« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2012, 05:58:17 AM »

Your new experiments are as usual looking just great! I like the concrete post as is....it could be very damp or just very dark from pollution etc. I have seen them look like that. The wooden beam looks great too!

Anders
« Last Edit: December 14, 2012, 06:10:33 AM by Junior » Logged
chester
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« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2012, 07:59:12 AM »

Well it is good to hear you're having fun. Your results are quite impressive.
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« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2012, 12:42:49 PM »

Alexandre,

   Welcome to the Forum . I can see that you are going to make a valuable contribution to what goes on here .

  I have looked at your last photo and there is nothing there that is not believable .I don't have a problem with the colour  or quality of your bricks as they could easily fit into " The Real World " , and your wood all looks fine . The piece you have on the angle looks just like aged oak , and I could prove it as I have  piles of it dotted around the estate ,

  Nick
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2012, 11:29:49 PM »

I think the "slightly aged" plank looks great! Looks very much like real boards I have seen.

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