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 31 
 on: June 05, 2021, 08:10:07 PM 
Started by 1-32 - Last post by 1-32
Hi Lawrence.
We are bubble friends crazy hey.
My favorite natural roots and grasses always on the lookout, mosses another favorite. There is a company in Italy that specializes in natural products I think they are called Diosphere ? great stuff especially the olive tree branches but I don't know how they would go getting through border control.
The best ground cover locally came from Chuck's ballast ever heard of him? Chuck used to travel around looking for dust and dirts and then sell them with the location attached he also did clays -but what happened to Chuck?
cheers

 32 
 on: June 05, 2021, 05:02:33 PM 
Started by 1-32 - Last post by Lawrence@NZFinescale
Kim,

I think the twig is completely out of scale. It just looks like what it is: a 1-1 scale twig. For my opionion It gives the whole scene away (and the scene has pretty darn lots of character!). Same with the clothesline, which is much to thick (as long as it is a line at the prototype and not a metak rod or tube or something). Addtitinally I think the three pigeons staggering at the same time is abit overdone. Do you maybe have some sitting calmly - and only one just arriving?

Cheers,
Volker
 

I find roots are excellent for this sort of thing.  Usefully collected from river beds after floods in NZ, although when in the UK I collected them from freshly ploughed fields adjacent to hedgerows.

 33 
 on: June 05, 2021, 01:22:01 PM 
Started by Design-HSB - Last post by finescalerr
Outstanding, especially the final soldering job! -- Russ

 34 
 on: June 05, 2021, 12:34:25 AM 
Started by Design-HSB - Last post by Ray Dunakin
Holy cow!

 35 
 on: June 04, 2021, 04:37:22 PM 
Started by 1-32 - Last post by 1-32
morning.
Thanks for the observations I find them really helpful especially if you do freelance the second opinion makes all the difference.
So moving on.4 new pictures .
The first is my finished rail motor the portions work basically I have cut 3 mm off the height of the cab and lowered the chassis by 2 mm let's say one-quarter of a inch. After seeing better references I realized how squat the original is my adjustments follow these observations.
The second picture shows the now trimmed back yard the main tree is less bulky but I have left the fallen branch that follows the back boundary. I really like this as it finishes the scene and is very typical.
The third is a picture that shows a house that is definitely being overgrown food for thought.
And the fourth is a possible extension to the trackside of the model, one of the few Australian rivers that are on the edge of the wilderness this would work well for the river section .
and lastly the track next to the house this is also typical of the sugar cane growing area of tropical Australia and I also want one my own private railway to do the shopping with.
cheers.
.
.

.

 36 
 on: June 04, 2021, 01:54:44 AM 
Started by 1-32 - Last post by Hydrostat
Kim,

I think the twig is completely out of scale. It just looks like what it is: a 1-1 scale twig. For my opionion It gives the whole scene away (and the scene has pretty darn lots of character!). Same with the clothesline, which is much to thick (as long as it is a line at the prototype and not a metak rod or tube or something). Addtitinally I think the three pigeons staggering at the same time is abit overdone. Do you maybe have some sitting calmly - and only one just arriving?

Cheers,
Volker
 

 37 
 on: June 03, 2021, 01:35:33 AM 
Started by 1-32 - Last post by finescalerr
Do you have enough flexibility in the design to move the tracks farther from the house? -- Russ

 38 
 on: June 02, 2021, 07:34:04 PM 
Started by 1-32 - Last post by 1-32
form and tying it together.
In the recent picture of the backyard, form is lacking even if it is a messy scene just think of an overgrown semi-tropical garden looking at it in the morning the foliage of the second tree needs attention and the clothesline also,small jobs but really tricky.
cheers

 39 
 on: June 02, 2021, 06:30:26 PM 
Started by Design-HSB - Last post by Bill Gill
Wow! That is a lot of excellent designing, clean etching and impeccable fabrication!!
It looks grate (that's a pun), and great!

 40 
 on: June 02, 2021, 02:08:29 PM 
Started by Design-HSB - Last post by Design-HSB
I'm busy constructing and from time to time I have to check if that's really possible.
 
That's why I started with the diamond gratings for the steps.


Film drawn on the computer for diamond grid steps. Format 200 x 300 mm.


The finished etching sheet made of 0.15 mm nickel silver sheet with a format of 200 X 300 mm.


The etched parts held in a frame for a diamond grid.


The stripes are turned down in the left grid frame and up in the right grid frame to be able to plug them together.


Thus, half of the strips are put together, since the 1.2 mm height of the strips, because of the small distance, had to be distributed over a total of 4 frames.


Prepared is the next frame, again with each 2 strips to fill the gaps.


After putting it together, the last frame is ready.


Now the grid is put together and the frames are fixed on the outside with solder, so that the part can be further processed.


Before separating from the frame, all nodes were soldered by the grid at the cross points. This was done with a lot of flux, a large soldering iron with a wide tip and very little solder.


View of the finished grid with a coin for size comparison.

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