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Another Artillery Tractor

Started by Peter_T1958, March 04, 2024, 08:55:20 AM

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Peter_T1958

#45
Quote from: Hydrostat on May 28, 2024, 11:08:21 AMFor sure you're on the right way. I think those things must have been quite oily and greasy?
Volker

It must have been quite oily but also wet and dirty, and I am working on that. The original was photographed by an American soldier on a rainy day in February 1919 at Oberkail (Germany). It stood there diabeled and looted of all useful things (tools, spare parts, etc.). I will try to come the original as near as possible, but that is a long procedure. Not only the dirty, oily appearance is a task, new for me is the approach to portray a wet vehicle after some rain shower. I don't even know how I will archieve that...

Zusammenbau_18.jpg
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/

shropshire lad

Quote from: finescalerr on May 29, 2024, 12:10:04 AMWhoops! I forgot the "t". Nick, go stand in the corner! -- Russ

  I'm not going to go stand in the corner for your failings , this time it is you who should go there . And you can't take any bikini clad beauties for company .

finescalerr

Oh, very well, Nick. I'll stand in the corner. And while I'm there I'll think about Peter's excellent model. -- Russ

Lawrence@NZFinescale

Quote from: Peter_T1958 on May 29, 2024, 02:00:11 AMIt must have been quite oily but also wet and dirty, and I am working on that. The original was photographed by an American soldier on a rainy day in February 1919 at Oberkail (Germany). It stood there diabeled and looted of all useful things (tools, spare parts, etc.). I will try to come the original as near as possible, but that is a long procedure. Not only the dirty, oily appearance is a task, new for me is the approach to portray a wet vehicle after some rain shower. I don't even know how I will archieve that...



I've been watching Nightshift on YouTube and looking at VMS products. I'm not saying it would be easy, but the materials and techniques are out there.
Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
nzfinescale.com

Peter_T1958

I know the work of Martin Kovac, and of course, as a professional modeller, he can handle all the different techniques with ease and quick too. I also have a lot of Ammo and MIG stuff on my desk, but you all know, it depends not only on good products. 

So I had to recognise all over the years that all those tutorials may give you a basic idea how to approach a desired effec, but you (or at least me) I got NEVER the same results. :(

An example: Ammo and other brands offer some good stuff called «WET EFFECTS». They do give the impression of wet, and therefore slightly glossy surfaces. What it doesn't take into account is, that the wet surfaces are always in some degree darker then the dry ones.
 
So, again I rely mostly on an old-fashioned technique to do the weathering: oil colours (of course in combination with up-to-date products).

Cheers, Peter
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/

Lawrence@NZFinescale

Quote from: Peter_T1958 on May 30, 2024, 12:16:35 AMI know the work of Martin Kovac, and of course, as a professional modeller, he can handle all the different techniques with ease and quick too. I also have a lot of Ammo and MIG stuff on my desk, but you all know, it depends not only on good products. 

So I had to recognise all over the years that all those tutorials may give you a basic idea how to approach a desired effec, but you (or at least me) I got NEVER the same results. :(

An example: Ammo and other brands offer some good stuff called «WET EFFECTS». They do give the impression of wet, and therefore slightly glossy surfaces. What it doesn't take into account is, that the wet surfaces are always in some degree darker then the dry ones.
 


I know what you mean.  Personally, I've found that I can generally replicate the individual demonstrated effects pretty well.  I'm not doing military vehicles so the overall effects are not usually what I'm after (and I'm not Martin Kovacs).  What I have found is that the EXACT product can be important with layered techniques.  Some enamel thinners are more aggressive than others and some acrylics more resistant.  Likewise some clearcoats protect well and others not so much (or maybe I'm using them incorrectly).  Nothing worse than some weathering technique that removes earlier work!!

I haven't used them myself yet, but the VMS pigments and binders looked interesting for mud, both dry and wet.  Certainly the images on their website are convincing.
Cheers,

Lawrence in NZ
nzfinescale.com

Barney

Modelling in excellence
Barney
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Peter_T1958

Thank you Barney (the king of scratch building!). And here another work in progress photo. The pigments are on - I love this kind of weathering work, although, the rear wheel solely took me half a day and a lot of neck pain.  ::)

Zusammenbau_22klein.jpg

BTW. the toolbox isn't weathered yet, because I have to place there a decal. I decided to redraw all decals, IMHO the kit ones had not the right font - and it is an old-style German script... :o

Ersatzteile.jpg
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

https://industrial-heritage-in-scale.blogspot.ch/

finescalerr

So far the model looks outstanding. I'm glad to learn it took so many hours to weather. I once spent two days weathering a locomotive and began to doubt my sanity. -- Russ