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Always take the back roads

Started by Hauk, September 18, 2022, 05:09:09 AM

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WP Rayner

#15
Here are a few from years ago. The concrete truck was on a back road not far from Stratford, ON, photographed in the early 1970s. I often wonder what happened to this truck. Hopefully someone rescued it. The building was the Blacksmith Shop in Lompoc, CA, photographed in the 1990s. Not particularly good photos: the truck images were scanned from 35mm snapshot prints, the Blacksmith Shop was photographed with a very early digital camera.

FordConcrete1Enhanced.jpg
FordConcrete2Enhanced.jpg 

LompocBsmith3Enhanced.jpg
LompocBsmith1Enhanced.jpg 

Paul

Whisky Workbench
Stay low, keep quiet, keep it simple, don't expect too much, enjoy what you have.

Ray Dunakin

That cement mixer is very interesting!
Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin's World

WP Rayner

#17
Quote from: Ray Dunakin on October 07, 2022, 09:05:26 PMThat cement mixer is very interesting!

Here are a couple additional shots Ray...

FordConcrete3Enhanced.jpg  FordConcrete4Enhanced.jpg
Paul

Whisky Workbench
Stay low, keep quiet, keep it simple, don't expect too much, enjoy what you have.

Barney

In the Backwoods of Stratford Upon Avon England UK - Found in a Architectural Reclamation Yard ( a posh expensive name for a tat yard dealing in expensive Building materials of all sorts ) a MILLARS (of Pinners Hall,London EC) Road Roller I have searched High and Low for information but can only find stuff on cement mixers/dump trucks and alsorts of construction equipment that MILLARS specialised  in - The dump truck appears to share the same chassis ( looks like a narrow gauge type of chassis) but the road roller chassis has been badly hacked and has a late Ford OHV crossflow engine fitted with the Ford Radiator mounted be-hind the original cast aluminium radiator which is badly damaged - the wooden box also looks a bit of a hash job to ! the exhaust pipe looks like a copper drain pipe. The Good news is it runs/stops and starts perfectly ! its a true "Odd Bod" love to know more about does any one know anything ? A man from one of the tractor mags said he has never seen one. Could be rare but on the other hand who knows
Barney - PHOTOS TO FOLLOW REQUIRE DOWN SIZING
Could be worth modelling just to keep the "rivet counters" at bay   
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

photos the "odd bod"
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

3 the Rad
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Barney

6 For some unknown reason had to load on one by one kept saying "there are more photos to upload or cancel!!"
just when I thought I had got used to this uploading and resizing
Im going to sleep
Barney
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Les Tindall

Now that cement truck is VERY modellable!  Lots of detail so it would need to be minimum 1/24 scale. Barney, any truck kits in that scale that would work as a basis for the model?
Les 

Barney

Les if you built things in 1/35th there would be no problem at all loads of car / truck type bodies and chassis to do the trick - in 1/24th not much offerings in the 1 ton to 2 ton vehicles to convert you would defiantly  require one with a separate chassis and it wood have to be of hefty construction - it looks like the rear part of the chassis has been well beefed up to carry the weight of the cement mixer with a loaded drum of cement - the Ford bible /manual  of the 1920/30 era shows most chassis extended with separate leaf springs at the rear and extra cross members most appear to have double rear wheels or of  much heavy type of construction
Is it a large chunk of wood that can been seen running along the length of the chassis on the photo
Special chassis were often built by other companies than the car manufacture for special usage
I agree it would make a nice build in 1/24th but it would give most of us a head ache
Barney
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson

Ray Dunakin

I'm wondering if that cement truck was used to mix the cement on-site, or just haul it to the site the way modern cement trucks do?
Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin's World

Barney

With ref' to many articles (Gracies Guide and vehicle manufactures) of this sort of set-up - normally used only for site use Unless You were brave ! But you never know some one will come up with another answer - the days of ready mix had yet to come!!
Barney
Never Let someone who has done nothing tell you how to do anything
Stuart McPherson