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Author Topic: Wood Stain  (Read 6301 times)
TRAINS1941
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« on: June 03, 2007, 04:27:50 PM »

I guess this is basically for Marc.  But feel free to lend a hand.
Marc you did topic of Wood Stain back in April on the RR Forum you used BIS silverwood as a base then Floquil paints over it which came out perfect.  I'm looking to do that but with a red stain like they used on old Silver and Ore mills way back when.  I used Floquil Boxcar Red, Caboose Red and a combination of both the paints.  And then thinned down.  Would you or anyone else have any other reds to try to get that color?  Or would there be other colors I could use on a Silver or Ore mine?

Jerry
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« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2007, 06:11:18 PM »

Hmm..tough question. Really depends on the effect one were trying to achieve, and in what scale.

For a red color, I would probably default to Floquil "Oxide Red" (or sim color by other mfr.). I am completely unknowledgeable when it comes to mining and associated structures, however my assumption would be that the color used to paint these buildings was sim to the way Westside LCo. painted their cars...white paint base, with red oxide powder added for durability and protection....this was the cheapest way to go in those days.....and I don't really see the miniers expending any more than necessary to paint their mines. The paint was primarily a utilitarian affair. (there were also mines that had buildings, or were painted, in a yellow ochre....among red mine buildings this may have been used to mage a specific structure stand out for location/importance/utility reasons.)

So...taking that into account, one might have some variations on the oxide red color...some darker, and some lighter...depending on the mix. I would asssume that unless the mine owners/painters had a record of the exact mix formula, to use every time...you might even see some variation from structure to structure, or from one side of the building to the next. (you would have some variation on the building sides anyhow, due to weather exposure and sun).

If I recall the technique correctly, I did not thin the the floquil, before applying it over the Silverwood, as I didn't want it seeping into all the fine wood graining, splits and spawls. I think I merely dipped a soft rag into a small puddle of floquil...dabbed most of it off...and then pulled/drew the board through the rag (without applying too much preassure on the rag. You can also lay the stripwood flat on a surface, and just draw the rag along the length of it....this allows you to "lift" towards the end , or in areas wher you want more silverwood showing. The idea here would be not to press the paint into the grain/wood....but rather leave a thin coat on the surface, with hints of the silvering showing through, or at the ends/locations where the paint would wear.

Were I to try this today (to represent a painted board with silvering old/worn/faded/rotting/etc wood areas)....I might experiment around with using Tamiya or Lifecolor acrylics over the Silverwood in a sim applied manner...or maybe/likely more along the lines of the technique that Chuck Doan used on his Barn Dio. Marcel Ackels method of ooak stain, watercolors, gumarabic,and acrylic paint might also be able to be aplied. Most likely The stucture would probably use a bit from each of these methods.

Hope that helps a bit...if not let me know.

Marc
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2007, 06:43:29 PM »

Marc

The scale would be Sn3, old but not falling down building.  I did go to Chuck Doan's web site and looked at the barn like you said.  An he does have how he did it.  So I think between the information you have given me and his article, I basically have what I am looking for.  Unless you think because of the scale it would be better with a different color?  If you have any other suggestions let me know.  I'll try what you have given me with the red oxide and see how that works, and try to post some pictures of strips of wood.
Thanks for all your help.

Jerry
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2007, 08:37:01 AM »

Jerry,

Marcs wiping technique is what I have used on several models. I tend to find Oxide Red a bit bright, but you may like it. Colors I have used include Floquil Boxcar Red, Southern Freight car Brown and ATSF Mineral Brown (individually straight from the bottle, not mixed together). A lot of times paint on wood just fades rather than a sharp peel, so the wiping method works well for this. I almost always do board for board, so each piece is individually wiped. If I were to do a peeling technique I would use acrylics and a resist method like the paint thinner or the Gum Arabic (I really want to try that one!) I also prefer the Silverwood stain. 



CD
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