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Author Topic: Old Wagons  (Read 137849 times)
Bill Gill
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« Reply #315 on: January 02, 2019, 07:02:18 AM »

Somehow I missed all the postings about your pie cart until today. It's another terrific build! And I'm glad I stumbled upon it because I really like pies. I hope you hold onto the model; it should not even be subjected to a possibility of being binned.
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #316 on: January 05, 2019, 12:48:23 AM »

This one is a Market Gardeners Trolley, or Adelaide Trolley (or Lorry) in 1/12th scale, made from the drawings published by J.E.Bishop & Son in The Australian Coachbuilder and Saddler, July 1896. Used a Lorry that’s in the museum at Millicent, as a reference for the painting and scrolling.


Beautiful! Another masterpiece!
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greenie
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« Reply #317 on: February 09, 2019, 05:03:04 AM »

Another one finished and ready for the cupboard.
This is a 1/12th scale model of a 'WHIM' which is used to drag large logs around the countryside, preferably from the bush site into the sawmill. I bought a book called 'Jinkers and Whims' by a Mr Jack Bradshaw, all about the way they used to do the 'timber getting' from around his backyard. The Whims looked like an interesting model to have a go at, so I contacted Jack Bradshaw and he supplied me with numerous photos and lot's of measurements to make a scale drawing of the biggest Whim that was made.
The full sized vehicle (Whim) was used around the Manjimup area of Western Australia for dragging in rather large trees from the scrub to the sawmill. It could be used with up to twenty, or, even thirty horses if required, depended on how heavy the log was that they had to drag around. The wheels were 3.1 mts ( 10'-2") diameter and the steel arch could accommodate a log at least 6 to 7 ft across, depended on where the point of balance was on the log, even if the log was up to 40 feet long. It was made approx. mid to late 1930's and used up to around the late 1940's. It was eventually replaced with secondhand ex war machinery.
Left out in the scrub to rot away for years, until it was rescued and bought into the wood mill, where it was then put on display for another couple of decades. Eventually the local 'men's shed' got hold of it after the sawmill closed it’s door’s for good, they have done a few running repairs and painted it, to try and protect it from the weather and have put it on display again, this time at a local park.

In America they used something similar called ‘Big Wheels’, but most of them had a straight axle and you could only place a small load UNDER the straight axle, where-as with the ‘Whims’ they had a rather large arched axle and you could load bigger logs than  what you could with a Big Wheels.

The first picture shows the full sized vehicle and you can clearly see how large the wheels actually are ( photo swiped from the web ).

The last two photo's are just to give you a perspective of just how bloody big this Whim actually is, there's a 1/12th scale Market Gardener's Trolley, parked under the arch of the model Whim, both are made to 1/12th scale.





https://ibb.co/rwt9YZH

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https://ibb.co/jZfnDJJ



« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 11:33:51 PM by greenie » Logged
finescalerr
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« Reply #318 on: February 09, 2019, 12:44:11 PM »

Most satisfactory! -- Russ
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #319 on: February 09, 2019, 06:37:29 PM »

Wow that's really nice.  Beautiful work.

Jerry
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« Reply #320 on: February 10, 2019, 02:10:13 AM »

Under this link, the pictures of the very beautiful successful car can be looked more comfortably.
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Regards Helmut
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #321 on: February 10, 2019, 11:09:49 PM »

Stunning work!
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #322 on: February 11, 2019, 10:33:13 AM »

     Many of the American log carriers had an arched rather then square mount to carry the logs.  The teamster would chain the log to the carrier with the tongue almost straight up in the air.  Once the log was secured, the teamster would then pull on the tongue and raise the front of the log off of the ground.  Many American loggers used either oxen or mules instead of horses.  most of the logging teams used 6 or more pairs of draft animals to move the loads. 

     There are still many small logging operators throughout the US who use draft animals when logging smaller tracts of forest as they do little damage to smaller trees which will be allowed to grow and be harvested later.  One logger I know down near Keysville, Va has a team of oxen named Tom and Jerry. Logging selectively with draft animals leaves the forest in better shape and can lead to a sustainable harvest which does not destroy streams and other elements of the ecology in the forest.  Additionally, many well trained draft teams can be started toward the log dump and then left on their own to get there.
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greenie
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« Reply #323 on: February 14, 2019, 07:53:09 PM »

A couple of photos showing the Whim loaded with a small load.

https://ibb.co/jzkptHX

https://ibb.co/QF0DdQT
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« Reply #324 on: February 15, 2019, 06:33:01 AM »

Just interesting to see in a different way than I suspected. Only where now the horse pulls with us the train chain is placed by the horse, just once around the tree trunk and then secured with a nail.
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #325 on: February 15, 2019, 06:46:57 AM »

Here's a device with a related function that I believe was designed by a guy who once lived on large farm on land granted to his ancestors by Geo. III, right across the street from me. His Packer Stump Puller & Wall Builder was said to be a lot more versatile and stronger than other devices.
For building walls there was a sort of heavy duty 'ice tong' that gripped a stone in a pair of shallow drill holes (about thumbnail diameter and 1/2 in. deep).

The area around here is loaded with stonewalls. A couple years ago I discovered that many of of them lining this street (old pentway) and a few other local walls in the general area had pairs of small drill holes on opposite sides of all the largest stones. I have searched, but never found other walls with those paired holes.

I believe they were built with this device and wrote a magazine article about it (never got published).

The photo in excerpt from local history newsletter shows a couple of the pullers working a few blocks from here.

(You can click on photos to enlarge them.)

A nearby historical society said they thought they still have the iron parts of one of these pullers somewhere outside their building. I hope to go look for it.


* Packer Stump Puller Wall Builder 1a.jpg (67.37 KB, 1000x598 - viewed 105 times.)

* Packer 2a.jpg (65.97 KB, 1000x681 - viewed 99 times.)

* Packer 3a.jpg (68.47 KB, 1000x488 - viewed 129 times.)
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greenie
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« Reply #326 on: February 17, 2019, 05:11:27 AM »

Just interesting to see in a different way than I suspected. Only where now the horse pulls with us the train chain is placed by the horse, just once around the tree trunk and then secured with a nail.


G'day Helmut, got any photos showing how the chains were held onto the log with just that one nail, please.
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greenie
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« Reply #327 on: February 17, 2019, 05:13:17 AM »

Bill, one hell of an interesting and unusual device that Stump Puller/Rock Carrier, eh.  Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked
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Terry Harper
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« Reply #328 on: February 25, 2019, 05:09:23 PM »

Wonderful work and cool stuff!

Up here in northern New England when the horse replaced the ox in the 1860's most of the moving of timber took place in winter using sleds to
haul directly to the mill or more usually to the nearest river or lake.

A typical two-sled powered by a good team of horses could easily move a 7 ton load over the ice
roads.

From about 1900 on tractors came into common use though horse power was used well into the 1940's
on many operations.

This past weekend I had the opportunity to test out a newly constructed circa 1926 sled. We didn't have the
chains setup yet so we couldn't carry a load with it but it was a ton of fun anyway.

The sled itself measure over 33 feet long and weighs close to a ton itself. It was built from original factory drawings
by a group of students at our local Technical school using timber from several large oak trees that were blown down
during a severe wind storm last year.

All good fun!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOlVfAzZInM&feature=youtu.be



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mabloodhound
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« Reply #329 on: March 06, 2019, 02:50:02 PM »

A couple of photos showing the Whim loaded with a small load.

https://ibb.co/jzkptHX

https://ibb.co/QF0DdQT

The hook-up doesn't look right.  The chain should be suspended from the arch so that it lifts the log off the ground as the team pulls forward.
As shown in the photo, the log would dig into the ground as the team pulled.
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Dave Mason
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