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Author Topic: Old Wagons  (Read 152367 times)
greenie
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« Reply #330 on: March 06, 2019, 07:32:59 PM »

The big chain in the middle of the log is positioned so that the log is of the ground at the middle and rear, this is to allow the log to be a bit nose heavy, so when the motive power stops, then the nose of the log will dig into the ground and all proceedings will just come to a stop.
Failure to load the log nose heavy, will see the motive power ( either horses or bullocks ) run over from the rear when you want to stop, not a nice thing to do to the animals.
There were a few horses and bullocks killed and injured, before it was worked out that you needed the log to be nose heavy.

By having the log nose heavy, when you started the team pulling, the nose came up of the ground and so long as forward pressure was applied, the nose stayed clear of the ground and it all just kept rolling along nicely.


* 33ab.jpg (201.56 KB, 850x571 - viewed 235 times.)
« Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 07:36:49 PM by greenie » Logged
greenie
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« Reply #331 on: March 06, 2019, 07:48:23 PM »

Here's a picture showing how the Whim was first used, it had a Jinker attached to the front of the long bar on the Whim, so it was used as a four wheel vehicle. Somebody had the Jinker collapse and were stuck out in the scrub with just the Whim, so they used the Whim as a stand alone vehicle.
OK, it wasn't very successful until a few kinks had been ironed out, like how to stop it killing the motive power, when that was worked out, the Whim then became a stand alone vehicle and was used right up to the mid 1950's in Western Australia's Jarrah and Karri forests.


* Jinkeraa.jpg (223.66 KB, 775x482 - viewed 202 times.)
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mabloodhound
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« Reply #332 on: March 13, 2019, 12:11:36 PM »

Thanks for the explanation which now makes sense.
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Dave Mason
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NORCALLOGGER
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« Reply #333 on: March 13, 2019, 05:43:16 PM »

The big chain in the middle of the log is positioned so that the log is of the ground at the middle and rear, this is to allow the log to be a bit nose heavy, so when the motive power stops, then the nose of the log will dig into the ground and all proceedings will just come to a stop.
Failure to load the log nose heavy, will see the motive power ( either horses or bullocks ) run over from the rear when you want to stop, not a nice thing to do to the animals.
There were a few horses and bullocks killed and injured, before it was worked out that you needed the log to be nose heavy.

By having the log nose heavy, when you started the team pulling, the nose came up of the ground and so long as forward pressure was applied, the nose stayed clear of the ground and it all just kept rolling along nicely.


Hence the advancement from Stiff Tongue Big Wheels to the Slip Tongue Big Wheels in the Western Pine Forests, to protect the teams and workers.
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #334 on: April 20, 2019, 02:21:12 PM »

Here's a bit of video (2m 41s total, look starting about 15 seconds for a few seconds more.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWRscujkPxU
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finescalerr
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« Reply #335 on: April 20, 2019, 09:16:44 PM »

I feel rather sympathetic toward the horse. -- Russ
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greenie
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« Reply #336 on: April 21, 2019, 09:08:19 PM »

That Belgian Draft Horse sure is a good example of decent horse flesh, specifically bred to do the job that he excels at doing. :-)
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #337 on: April 27, 2019, 08:33:31 PM »

     Many of the larger draft animals were originally breed to be the transport for armored knights in addition to doing the heavy lifting.  IMHO, I would rather have a team of oxen then one of horses as they aren't as skittish, work a bit more slowly and in general can out pull a pair of draft horses.  Strong, gentle, steady workers who if well kept would work for more then 20 years.
     Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has since the beginning kept oxen as draft animals and I can remember Tom and Jerry who were a matched pair used to pull a delivery cart through the restoration.  For a number of years the young son of their handler would dress in period costume and lead them down Duke of Gloucester Street by a light cord tied to the nose ring of the lead ox.  It was great to see a 55 pound 9 year old controlling almost 2 tons of muscle with a cord which was to light to be used on a dog leash.  When they would stop in front of one of the stores, they would be restrained by a wooden block with a ring through one side tied to the cord as a reminder.   
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greenie
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« Reply #338 on: September 13, 2019, 04:12:00 PM »

Tis me again to annoy you once more.

This time it's a Bakers Waggonette made to 1/12th scale.

Just finished this one today, it has taken me just over 6 months of graft to get it finished, sometimes life just gets in the way of a decent hobby, eh.

The original full sized vehicle is on display at the Redlands Museum in Cleveland, Qld.
This vehicle was originally used around the Redlands District for bread deliveries, so now itís where it belongs, in the local Museum. It was reconditioned and given a liquid overhaul many years ago by an expert carriage builder by the name of Alex Hamilton.
He was the last of the old time carriage builders from around Brisbane, Qld.
His family had been Carriage-Makers at Kedron, Qld for about a century, thatís his grandfather and then his father joined the business, so Alex just had too follow along into the same business.

I had to do a series of drawings before I could start to make the model, I didnít have a drawing similar, so plenty of photoís and lotís of measurements with a lot more time spent at the computer doing the drawings.

Mostly timber construction, with a few bits of sheet acrylic used for the wheel fellies and used Acrylic for the shafts as well. A lot of brass was used for most of the metal work, then a bit of steel turned down for the tyres and key-steel used for the axles.
All nuts and bolts are hand made using bronzing rods for the bolts and K & S square brass section  for the nuts.
Paint is just ordinary enamel house paint and the decals are all done in house using an ALPS MD 5500 printer, bloody magic bit of gear that ALPS printer, you can make a much better decal than what you could ever do with a Laser or Inkjet printer.
Each wheel has 67 decals added to it, so for the four wheels thatís 248 decals, donít ask how many on the complete model as I have never bothered to count each and every one of them. It took me about a week, to put all the decals onto the model.

Plenty of photoís showing what medium I used for the construction and then lotís more showing the finished model.

The last two photo's are of the full sized vehicle at the Museum.

So have a look and any questions, then please ask.



































« Last Edit: September 13, 2019, 05:30:29 PM by greenie » Logged
5thwheel
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« Reply #339 on: September 13, 2019, 08:23:35 PM »

Beautiful, well done Greenie.

Bill
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Bill Hudson
Fall down nine times,
get up ten.
finescalerr
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« Reply #340 on: September 13, 2019, 09:11:57 PM »

Your models are always perfect and this one is yet another example of fastidious craftsmanship. Most satisfactory.

How do you make the spoke shape transition from round to oval?

Russ
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greenie
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« Reply #341 on: September 14, 2019, 01:20:08 AM »

G'day Russ, have a look thru this lot, think it explains most things I do, if not, then ask and I'll attempt to explain it.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/965313566821742/permalink/2020965034589918/


regards  Greenie   Wink
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SandiaPaul
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« Reply #342 on: September 14, 2019, 06:10:24 AM »

All these models are simply fantastic. One of my favorites things on here. Thanks for sharing them with all.
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Paul
greenie
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« Reply #343 on: September 14, 2019, 06:30:59 AM »

Thank you gentlemen for the kind words, they definately are appreciated.


regards. Greenie.   Grin
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #344 on: September 14, 2019, 12:07:29 PM »

As has been already said, your work is always a joy to see and read about.
I also hope it will be inspiring. At some point I still intend to try to convert a Jordan popcorn wagon into a Freihofer bakery delivery wagon for the New England Berkshire & Western. Your latest bakery waggonette can help motivate to start.


* popcorn.jpg (10.02 KB, 320x157 - viewed 51 times.)

* Freihofer.jpg (63.95 KB, 640x480 - viewed 45 times.)
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