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Author Topic: Old Wagons  (Read 138011 times)
greenie
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« Reply #330 on: March 06, 2019, 07:32:59 PM »

The big chain in the middle of the log is positioned so that the log is of the ground at the middle and rear, this is to allow the log to be a bit nose heavy, so when the motive power stops, then the nose of the log will dig into the ground and all proceedings will just come to a stop.
Failure to load the log nose heavy, will see the motive power ( either horses or bullocks ) run over from the rear when you want to stop, not a nice thing to do to the animals.
There were a few horses and bullocks killed and injured, before it was worked out that you needed the log to be nose heavy.

By having the log nose heavy, when you started the team pulling, the nose came up of the ground and so long as forward pressure was applied, the nose stayed clear of the ground and it all just kept rolling along nicely.


* 33ab.jpg (201.56 KB, 850x571 - viewed 160 times.)
« Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 07:36:49 PM by greenie » Logged
greenie
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« Reply #331 on: March 06, 2019, 07:48:23 PM »

Here's a picture showing how the Whim was first used, it had a Jinker attached to the front of the long bar on the Whim, so it was used as a four wheel vehicle. Somebody had the Jinker collapse and were stuck out in the scrub with just the Whim, so they used the Whim as a stand alone vehicle.
OK, it wasn't very successful until a few kinks had been ironed out, like how to stop it killing the motive power, when that was worked out, the Whim then became a stand alone vehicle and was used right up to the mid 1950's in Western Australia's Jarrah and Karri forests.


* Jinkeraa.jpg (223.66 KB, 775x482 - viewed 123 times.)
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mabloodhound
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« Reply #332 on: March 13, 2019, 12:11:36 PM »

Thanks for the explanation which now makes sense.
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Dave Mason
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A people that values its privileges above its principles will soon lose both.~Dwight D. Eisenhower
NORCALLOGGER
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« Reply #333 on: March 13, 2019, 05:43:16 PM »

The big chain in the middle of the log is positioned so that the log is of the ground at the middle and rear, this is to allow the log to be a bit nose heavy, so when the motive power stops, then the nose of the log will dig into the ground and all proceedings will just come to a stop.
Failure to load the log nose heavy, will see the motive power ( either horses or bullocks ) run over from the rear when you want to stop, not a nice thing to do to the animals.
There were a few horses and bullocks killed and injured, before it was worked out that you needed the log to be nose heavy.

By having the log nose heavy, when you started the team pulling, the nose came up of the ground and so long as forward pressure was applied, the nose stayed clear of the ground and it all just kept rolling along nicely.


Hence the advancement from Stiff Tongue Big Wheels to the Slip Tongue Big Wheels in the Western Pine Forests, to protect the teams and workers.
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #334 on: April 20, 2019, 02:21:12 PM »

Here's a bit of video (2m 41s total, look starting about 15 seconds for a few seconds more.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWRscujkPxU
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finescalerr
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« Reply #335 on: April 20, 2019, 09:16:44 PM »

I feel rather sympathetic toward the horse. -- Russ
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greenie
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« Reply #336 on: April 21, 2019, 09:08:19 PM »

That Belgian Draft Horse sure is a good example of decent horse flesh, specifically bred to do the job that he excels at doing. :-)
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #337 on: April 27, 2019, 08:33:31 PM »

     Many of the larger draft animals were originally breed to be the transport for armored knights in addition to doing the heavy lifting.  IMHO, I would rather have a team of oxen then one of horses as they aren't as skittish, work a bit more slowly and in general can out pull a pair of draft horses.  Strong, gentle, steady workers who if well kept would work for more then 20 years.
     Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has since the beginning kept oxen as draft animals and I can remember Tom and Jerry who were a matched pair used to pull a delivery cart through the restoration.  For a number of years the young son of their handler would dress in period costume and lead them down Duke of Gloucester Street by a light cord tied to the nose ring of the lead ox.  It was great to see a 55 pound 9 year old controlling almost 2 tons of muscle with a cord which was to light to be used on a dog leash.  When they would stop in front of one of the stores, they would be restrained by a wooden block with a ring through one side tied to the cord as a reminder.   
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