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Author Topic: Boxcar weathering  (Read 5314 times)
Cypress Hills
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« on: February 03, 2010, 04:52:34 PM »

I'm collecting tips and tricks to take a new, On30 Bachman boxcar red boxcar and weather the heck out of it.

I have a neat tool from MicroMark called Eurotool. It's like a pen with a wire brush protruding from one end. From my limited experieince, it would be great
to scrap the walls of the boxcar with this tool to take the shine off it and dull or flatten the boxcar red.

From that point on, I'm lost.

Suggestions or comments are greatly appreciated. Cheers.

Murray
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finescalerr
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2010, 03:14:16 AM »

Someone may be able to provide the answer you want but, if it were my model, I would strip off the factory paint and repaint and weather from scratch. I think you would achieve a much higher quality result. As you probably know, this forum tends to encourage us to avoid major compromise. And, let me assure you, I have learned the hard way that the guys here see right through my shortcuts! -- Russ
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2010, 05:26:08 AM »

I have never physically seen one, but if I recall correctly, the Bman cars are integrally colored plastic....so no problem. I would though seriously consider stripping all the matal parts (if you plan on using their trucks)...it's pretty easy to do by just soaking them in 90% Isopropyl alcohol, until the paint comes off. [However I would seriously suggest tossing the Bmann trucks and usin McLeod Western ones (available through various dealers...but I recommend Foothill Model Works http://www.foothillmodelworks.com/)

...back to the brush/wire pencil....the wire prncil you bought is a great tool....I use it for both wood and plastic, and it makes good grain for 1/48......do some practicing on a scrap car or scrap styrene so you get the feel for it. (note the steel wire version works better than the brass version, as the brass is a bit too soft and starts to deform very quickly).

Once you have "scratched" the grain into the individual boards (try to do each board seperately for a better and more varied, effect. This may require you to make a masking jig, or you can use the very tedious approack and mask the adjacent boards on each side with some Dyno labeling tape.)

Once you have done all the boards you will want to go in with some really fine steel wool (0000) and carefully/gently rub it arcoss the surface (in the grain direction) to remove any fuzz from the scratching/graining (some guys use brillow pads for this...but I have not had good luck with them).

You will then need to wash the parts in warm water with dish soap (do not use hand soaps as they contain moisturizers)...this is to remove dust, oils, and any fabrication residue. I would then primer the car with some Mr. Surfacer primer.

If it were me, I would remove all the cast-on Bmann detailing before scratching/graining the car, and then replace it after the steel-wooling with new parts from Grandt, Tichy, or McLeod Western. it not only makes the car easier to grain, but the new dtails will be much better than the Bmann ones.

This unfinished SBS page shows how I used the tool (and sandpaper) to grain styrene boards.:

http://www.rbadesign.net/TERRAPIN/MR_CaneCar.htm


Here some styrene boards with more wear and detail...these were dine with an Xacto and the wire pencil.




The wire pencil was also used on this, and you can clearly see the appearance before being steel-wooled.



MR
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 05:29:15 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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RichD
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2010, 12:24:06 PM »

Just for grins.. you might want to check out these weathering sites also... I believe both are commercial sites and or trying to see books.. but the images are noteworthy.


http://modeltrainsweathered.com/

http://www.weatheringfactory.com/

RichD
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Tom Neeson
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2010, 10:28:55 PM »

...back to the brush/wire pencil....the wire prncil you bought is a great tool....

Marc,
    Is this wire pencil any better than, say a small stainless steel wire wheel brush from McMaster? Just wondering if the pencil is worth it when I already have some small stainless brushes. I also like to use coarse sanding sticks/nail buffers for texturing styrene. Followed by a quick swipe of liquid glue to remove the fuzzies.

Tom
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2010, 12:40:36 AM »

Tom,

I honestly can't say  if it's any better. I have never seen the brushes from McMaster Carr. Dor me it's merely convenient because of the way it's held (like a pencil)...which for me makes it second nature, and for the density of the bristles, (which tends to be denser than a file card or other wire brushes I have seen) and the dia. of the tip (which makes it convenient for tight spaces and around details.  I think it just comes down to what you are comfortable working with.


Marc
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