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Author Topic: Dos Manos - Building #4  (Read 23053 times)
Philip Smith
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« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2010, 08:12:08 AM »

your  drygood shelving, wallpaper, and bottles .
nice touch!
Philip
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #31 on: March 14, 2010, 11:37:22 AM »

It's wonderful, Ray. All your efforts on bottle labelling lead you to a fine result.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #32 on: March 15, 2010, 06:18:37 PM »

Most satisfactory. -- Russ
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #33 on: March 15, 2010, 08:12:59 PM »

Those are terrific Ray... very well done and well worth all the fiddly effort. Third from the left, front row looks like a particular favourite single malt... Wink Don't forget Prince Albert in the can...

Paul
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #34 on: March 15, 2010, 10:35:41 PM »

Wow. That looks really great. The bottles and boxes came out beautiful.

Marc
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« Reply #35 on: March 15, 2010, 10:58:13 PM »

Hey Ray,
Those are beautiful as is the structure.  Lots of little fiddley work there.

Just a couple of thoughts.
Most all the early Patent Medicine bottles were flat rectangular so they could be easily slipped into a jacket pocket to be carried around.  Not a bad idea as most of them were mainly alcohol, cocaine, or opium base.   Also most poison bottles were triangular in shape with round tops and they sold a lot of different poisons in drug and grocery stores.

Keep up the great work.
Rick
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #36 on: March 15, 2010, 11:58:59 PM »


Most all the early Patent Medicine bottles were flat rectangular so they could be easily slipped into a jacket pocket to be carried around.  Not a bad idea as most of them were mainly alcohol, cocaine, or opium base.   Also most poison bottles were triangular in shape with round tops.......

Rick

Interesting info. Thanks. When you say the poison bottles were triangular...I assume you mean in plan view?.....and why was that...for ease of identification by what was probably often only a potentially semi-literate consumer base?

Marc
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2010, 08:02:42 AM »

Those are good looking bottles Ray. It always surprises me how quickly little detail bits get used up after all the time spent on them. There's never enough!
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« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2010, 05:52:45 PM »

Marc,
Yes, most poison bottles were done in distictive shapes and/or bright colors mostly for the reason you mention.  Of course not all poisons were that way just as all patent medicines were not flat rectangles, as with all things nothing is definitive.

Here is a link to some pictures of various groupings of old bottles.  Note the different shapes and colors involved.

http://www.antiquebottledepot.com/bottles.php

Later
Rick
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« Reply #39 on: March 17, 2010, 02:01:38 AM »

Can you guys believe the vast amount of knowledge on these pages? We're learning how to model bottles on this thread. Others deal with every other imaginable topic. I'm blown away by what you guys turn up! -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #40 on: March 17, 2010, 09:58:44 AM »

I said the same thing after my cat's last hairball.
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“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #41 on: March 17, 2010, 10:09:32 AM »

I said the same thing after my cat's last hairball.

I'm still laughing Smiley  Great sense of humor!!!!!

Jerry

But the bottles are really cool.  Great job as is the building.
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Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
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« Reply #42 on: March 17, 2010, 02:09:44 PM »

Doan, back to the corner! -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2010, 08:25:51 PM »

Finally got into the mood to do some more work on this building. Among other things, I made a wall clock and five ceiling lamps for it. Here's the clock:

 


And here are three of the ceiling lamps:

 

 


The clock was made from a ring-shaped necklace clasp, with the clear plastic dome from a "googly" eye. The lamps were made from a couple of metal necklace beads soldered to a short length of brass tubing. I used Plastruct clear acrylic domes for the "glass" lampshades. The Plastruct domes were very thick, so I hollowed them out more using an oval carving bit in a Dremel tool. The domes were then given a coat of white spray paint on the outside.

I have some pics of the construction of these items on my website, beginning here:

http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Dos_Manos.html#106


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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #44 on: June 08, 2010, 04:00:03 PM »

Wow, amazing and inspiring work detailing this interior.  Great stuff.
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-- Dallas Mallerich  (Just a freakin' newbie who stumbled into the place)
Email me on the "Contact Us" page at www.BoulderValleyModels.com
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