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Author Topic: 1:8 Scale Gmeinder Feldbahn  (Read 22828 times)
RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2009, 08:40:55 PM »

Well, someone who gets my vote (and I'm sure there will be a good number of dissenting opinions here as well) is Martyn Welch who built a layout called "Hursley" that has been published in MRJ among other places (a caveat though... I've only seen this layout in photographs, not in person but even so, it's superb). I don't believe he built his own locos tho, I think Tony Reynalds gets the credit for those. I believe it's unrealistic to think there may be one individual who is accomplished in all disciplines.

I believe the best layouts though (at least model railways) are built by those who are accomplished in one or more of the required disciplines but who also have the good sense (and perhaps the wherewithal) to utilize the services of others who are more accomplished in the areas where the original builder is weak. The best layouts, as with any large and complex project, always seem to be collaborative efforts.

Paul
« Last Edit: December 28, 2009, 08:48:56 PM by Roughboy » Logged
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« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2009, 09:11:07 PM »

Paul, it looks like Martyn knows his weathering judging by a few web photos and his book. I wish I could find photos of the layout; I like to see what the British do that is different from over here. Oh and sorry if this is what is known as a thread hijack.

Craig, I though of George also. His work output in both commercial and his own layout is beyond belief. If there is someone who seems to have had the time to master many modeling aspects and produce the same style continuously to the completion of an entire layout it would be he. Kind of like a modern day John Allen.

Marc, why would I not doubt a French modeler and wife would build in an odd scale. The French have another style of modeling to be sure and perhaps worth looking for on the web. Thanks for the idea.

John
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John Palecki
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« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2009, 10:46:53 PM »

I actually think our own local boy here, Jacq, falls well into this category....though as far as I know he doesn't build his own engines. I also would say that Franck Tavernier probably fits the criteria.

John,
I think one difference between many euro RR modelers and those here, is that they really are into machining and fabricating their own detailed parts, locos and cars to a very high level of detail and accuracy. Yes, there is that same RTR, "lets just have fun", and "we don't need no stinking rules" contingent, but among those that truly model the level of detail craftsmanship is higher (though IMO many fall short in the painting aspect). I also feel that among those modelers the use of technology such as Rapid prototyping, 3D milling, photo etching, etc. is much much higher than here.  Here among most, laser cut wood is the cats meow.  (I actulally think that this has something to do with their educational system....but that's another topic......and just to nip any controversy/forum outcry, in the bud, re. that comment....I do know what I am talking about...I went to school there and here.)

MR
« Last Edit: December 28, 2009, 10:48:29 PM by marc_reusser » Logged

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« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2009, 04:57:18 AM »

Marc,

   You wouldn't be thinking of Gordon and Maggie Gravett and their 1/50th scale French layout Pempoul ,would you ?

  Craig ,

  George has had quite alot of help in the construction of his layout , so he hasn't done it all by himself . That , however , is not intended to diminish what he has achieved .

  Nick
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jacq01
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« Reply #19 on: December 29, 2009, 06:08:40 AM »

  Pempoul will be at the jubilee exhibition of the FdE Burscheid in Leverkusen in May.
  Also Henk Wust with his Punto Marina layout. The chairman Erich Walle has invited some of the best in Europe to attend in May.
  Nick, if you still plan to come, let me know and I put your names on my crew's list so you can take part at the buffet in the evening and have a nice conversation with members including of course Marcel, Alan Rees and me. 

 Painting the original colors is not a problem in Europe, the weathering is. Only the last 10 years some articles have appeared in a few leading magazines. Good information is mostly coming from the same handful of people. Often it is combined with the use of an airbrush. Most are reluctant as the resale value plays an important role in NOT doing it. Very little is done about the technique and pointing out the details.
As weathering is laborous and difficult to achieve in a production proces, the commercial influences are not interested in promoting it. Liliput tried it at the end of the 80's but the results were less than mediocre.

  Jacq
« Last Edit: December 29, 2009, 06:22:24 AM by jacq01 » Logged

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Waldbahner
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« Reply #20 on: December 29, 2009, 06:11:45 AM »

Hello from a German model railroader...

It seems that you all ignore one very important thing in this discussion :

THE BUILDER of the Gmeinder loco has to like his model !!! And I think he do so...

My opinion is, that many model builder overdo there weathering in most cases...
- layers of rost that will turn out to 1" think barks in 12"-scale
- scale up some of the wood grain scripped into boards with saw blades

Yes, there are also some real great modelers that capture the prototype in a fantastic way and you can't determine if it is prototype or just a model.

At last - we are all modelers with our own skills. Let us have some fun while model railroading =)
This type of discussion is typical for German boards and that's the reason, why I read and post in American forums like this.

Best regards, Gerd
« Last Edit: December 29, 2009, 06:13:50 AM by Waldbahner » Logged
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« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2009, 06:41:20 AM »

Marc,

   You wouldn't be thinking of Gordon and Maggie Gravett and their 1/50th scale French layout Pempoul ,would you ?


I would say that is a fair guess!

Check out Model Raiway Journal 182 (teaser pictures) and 185 (full article)
You can get MRJ back issues from Bob Peraman Books. He is reliable and accepts PayPal and credit cards.
http://www.pearman-books.com/

And by the way, Martyn Wylch´s Hursley layout was featured in MRJ #40

Regards, Håvard
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« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2009, 07:44:05 AM »

Personally for my two cents someone I think is close to having it all together building strutures, figures and scenery in all scales is Dave Revelia.

Jerry
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« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2009, 11:52:12 AM »

Personally for my two cents someone I think is close to having it all together building strutures, figures and scenery in all scales is Dave Revelia.

Jerry

  Hi Jerry ,

   Hope you all had a spiffing Christmas and are not doing to much back at work . I have been laying blocks inside whilst it is snowing outside . I hope it doesn't freeze tonight , or my mortar might get a bit buggered.

 Anyway , back to the question in hand , you are probably right that Dave is one of the few modellers that is good at most things he does , mainly because he is prepared to have a go at painting figures when most of the rest of us shy away from even having a go , but we haven't seen much evidence of his tracklaying or wiring skills so it is just possible that there is something he is not good at . Not very likely , but you never know .

   Nick
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« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2009, 12:11:24 PM »

Hello from a German model railroader...

It seems that you all ignore one very important thing in this discussion :

THE BUILDER of the Gmeinder loco has to like his model !!! And I think he do so...

My opinion is, that many model builder overdo there weathering in most cases...
- layers of rost that will turn out to 1" think barks in 12"-scale
- scale up some of the wood grain scripped into boards with saw blades

Yes, there are also some real great modelers that capture the prototype in a fantastic way and you can't determine if it is prototype or just a model.

At last - we are all modelers with our own skills. Let us have some fun while model railroading =)
This type of discussion is typical for German boards and that's the reason, why I read and post in American forums like this.

Best regards, Gerd

   Gerd ,

   You are probably right , that the modeller likes his own model , and a very fine model it is to . But what he has done after painting it does not make it look better in any way . He may not see that himself , but everyone here does . What people need to do for him is to point him in the direction of examples of good weathering of locos so that he may realise that there may be better ways than what he has done . If , when he has seen what is possible , he is still happy with what he has done , then we will leave him to his own little World . A good start would be some of the military modelling forums as the people on those forums can represent weathering on vehicles , be they tanks or trains , better than anyone .
  The loco does not have to be weathered very heavily or even rusted at all , but it does some further attention .

  I hope you understand what I am trying to get across ,

  Nick
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« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2009, 12:19:37 PM »

  Pempoul will be at the jubilee exhibition of the FdE Burscheid in Leverkusen in May.
  Also Henk Wust with his Punto Marina layout. The chairman Erich Walle has invited some of the best in Europe to attend in May.
  Nick, if you still plan to come, let me know and I put your names on my crew's list so you can take part at the buffet in the evening and have a nice conversation with members including of course Marcel, Alan Rees and me. 

  Jacq

 Jacq ,

  It is still Malcolm's and my intention to come over in May so if you can put us on your crew list as broom pushers we would be very grateful . With all these top modellers in attendance this sounds like it is going to be a hell of a show . Funnily enough I have a number of relations who don't live very far away  from Leverkusen , though I don't think I'll have time to see them .

  Nick
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« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2009, 01:12:19 PM »

I would have liked to see that loco if painted by Mig Jemenez or Michael Rinaldi.
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« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2009, 10:27:27 PM »

I was going to retire early tonight but this thread is going pretty good. What fun!

Marc, there seems to be two modeling broad categories in the US, the modelers who mostly use available stuff to make their miniature world turn, and the more nostalgic types who use sticks of wood and slow, careful finishing to create their scenes. The sophisticated machinery like CNC is for the few live steamers. Laser cutting is kind of a crossover, but it is kit based. However, Dave at VectorCut is an example of someone who is using the technology at a new exciting level.

Gerd, entschuldigen Sie, if the discussion is headed the wrong way. I will say that heavy weathering and the concept of a decrepit appearance of models is a side branch of the hobby that is to the taste of the modeler. Maybe it is a trend that will change in time. Meanwhile it is true that we all should somehow find the joy in our modeling hobby. But can anyone say that they have never glanced at a photo of others' modeling to make a mental comparison or to see how so-and-so did it? That is how I learned techniques and still set goals. And we are all critics of one form or another.

Is there a generalization alarm going off? Roll Eyes

John

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« Reply #28 on: December 29, 2009, 11:26:01 PM »


Is there a generalization alarm going off? Roll Eyes

John


....just use a big brush and broad strokes Wink Grin Grin Grin Grin.


Gerd,
Es war wirklich nich uebel gemeint. The loco is a truely beautiful and stunning piece of work. Something I could never achieve. The base paint job is perfectly fine as well. I wish he had left it at the factory new look. I never advocated that he should add rust or over-weather.  All I was trying to say is that the weathering is so childish and crude, and looks like no weathering I have ever seen ....that it really hurts and takes away from all the fantastic work that came before it.  I fully agree with you that the main objective is for him to be happy...and if he is, good for him......but......I personally, cannot believe that he can honestly look at the weathering on his loco and not know it is poorly done.....he is such an exacting craftsman, he would have to be blind not to realize this........I know most every mistake I make along the way in a project.... I know when I have done something poorly......and I am nowhere near his league of craftsman.

MR
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« Reply #29 on: December 30, 2009, 03:41:17 AM »

   
Quote
I actually think our own local boy here, Jacq, falls well into this category....though as far as I know he doesn't build his own engines. I also would say that Franck Tavernier probably fits the criteria.

 Thanks Marc,  I do and have done brass and white metal kits. Complete scratchbuilding isn't my league. I for sure will go nuts as it will be me who is deciding the detail level. Besides I prefer doing landscaping and scenery as it contains uncertainties I do not control.
 I'll do everything myself, such as carpentry, wiring, lighting and all diciplines needed to make a layout that makes me a happy man.

 Your point of someone explaining the finer points in weathering is difficult to achieve as the ones who advertise themselves as experts have little feeling with reality. Too many are too impatient to apply all the nuances and textures they see and are indoctrinated to believe the airbrush is the ultimate tool for weathering, quick and a reasonable controle of the amount of paint coverage. Of course there are a few "artists" like Franck, Emanuelle, Marcel, who have developed a feeling for it, but they are few...  In the US it is more common and idea's are shared freely.

Jacq
 
« Last Edit: December 30, 2009, 05:00:50 AM by jacq01 » Logged

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