Westlake Publishing Forums
April 09, 2020, 11:00:03 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 ... 16
  Print  
Author Topic: 5x5x7 project (1/35 scale)  (Read 107043 times)
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #45 on: January 07, 2010, 02:57:10 AM »

Ok...still trying to nail this down, but I think I am closer.

Using a .0125" drill bit, I drilled holes through the board at all the locations where I wanted nails. Into these holes were then inserted short peices of .080" styrene rod.




Once the pieces were all in, a small brush was used to paint the ends with some Floquil "Roof Brown", and some pigments.




The styrene pieces were then pushed flush into the board face, the board was then laid upside down on the work surface, and using a new sharp Xacto blade the extra styrene was carefully cut flush.




The boards were then turned back over and a very small dab of Silverwood was wicked into the hole around the head, to darken the hole rim.

In this image the bottom 4 boards were done using this new approach, while the upper ones are from the last method.



This new approach is definitely much less tedious, and fidgety.....one just needs to plan their board an d nail hole layout ahead of time.


Marc
« Last Edit: January 07, 2010, 03:27:11 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
jacq01
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1110



« Reply #46 on: January 07, 2010, 03:09:33 AM »


  Marc,

  this looks very good and a lot simpler to do as the "nails" are a lot easier to handle.

  Jacq
Logged

put brain in gear before putting mouth in action.
never underestimate the stupidity of idiots
I am what I remember.
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5602


« Reply #47 on: January 07, 2010, 03:14:45 AM »

The new nails look a little better, too.

So is the greenish cast an artifact of the lighting you used? It can't be the wood or the SilverWood stain and, besides, nothing of yours I've ever seen has that kind of coloration. Did you shoot under fluorescents?

Russ
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #48 on: January 07, 2010, 03:25:29 AM »

Marc,
Have you already tried using those MIG bolt details before? 
Dan

Dan,

I have a sheet of them, but have not used them for anything yet. They are beautifully and cleanly etched, but are a bit thinner than what I need/prefer at 1/35, for the applications I have been doing. The disk and washer set that I just ordered should be of use though.

As I am sure you are aware, many of the PE sets for armor kits frequently also often have a selection of bolts, disks, and washers on them....different mfr's do their sets from different metal thicknesses, so it is possible to get a fair range......problem with them though is they always need to be cut from the fret, which leaves the chance of a strange egde condition somewhere, which doing them on carier film completely avoids.  Another thing the carrier fill avoids is the condition found on some PE sets where they etch from front and back, and you end up with a small ridge hafway through...ok for some parts where it can be cleaned...but on small fdelly pieces like nuts and washers its a real PIA.

You have peaked my curiosity....what are you making etchings for?


MR
« Last Edit: January 07, 2010, 03:35:56 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #49 on: January 07, 2010, 03:35:00 AM »

Jacq,
Thanks. Yes, this approach is definitely easier, and gives more consitant results.


Russ,
The greenish cast is most likely due to my lighting. Still haven't re-set-up my photo booth thingy....so just shooting under my work lights, where I recently changed he bulbs to "clear" ones rather than the frosted I used to have/use and shoot under.....It is definitely making the colors come out all wonky....and accentuating the tan, blue and casting a green shade in the images....they are actually much more grey and brown.  (I have also violated my own rule of setting the white balance for each shot, and just been shooting with various pre-sets...none of which really corrects the problem.).....No worries...the final images will be shot correctly. Wink

MR
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #50 on: January 07, 2010, 06:53:56 AM »

I like it!
I'd like to try it with some blackened wire myself, may be when I get around to doing something else.......
I wonder if wicking the silverwood from behind would yield different/better results?
Thanks for doing the SBS!
-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
danpickard
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 487



WWW
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2010, 07:00:12 AM »

Hi Marc Grin,
I'm currently working on a locomotive bash project...turning the guts of a couple of Bachmann On30 2-8-0 Consolidation's into a Garratt 2-6-0 0-6-2 (more specifically G41, one of the loco's as featured on the Colac-Beech Forest line that I am centering some of my current modelling around, but the preserved version of the loco is it's sister G42, running on the "Puffing Billy" line in Melbourne, Australia).  Its intended to be a fairly good representative loco, not a scale replica (I ain't no master loco builder by a long shot, but there isn't really a readily available model of such a big loco, especially within my budget range, hence the bash).  Essentially the saved parts of the Bachmann mech are the chassis (minus a few wheel spacings) outside frame rods, drivers etc, and modified tenders, and will try to reuse the boiler with some new skins over it.

I was going to cut parts from brass for the modification, but thought bugger it, I'll have a go at etching the new stuff.  I've been busy for the last few weeks getting my head around looking at positive and negative images in setting up my resist artwork, and think most of it is nearly ready to transfer onto some brass sheets and drop into an etch tank.  Providing it works ok, I have a few more ideas I'd like to transfer to brass as well.  I thought it was going to involve only some basic etched shapes, but its been a bit addictive doing some of the artwork, and I'm now up to 5 sheets of 4"x10" brass for the project.  I was thinkig a bit lazy sort of...why bother trying to cut all that by hand if I can get a chemical to do the job for me?

Providing the first etch works half reasonable, I may start another thread on the project.

Dan
« Last Edit: January 07, 2010, 07:01:56 AM by danpickard » Logged

Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2496



WWW
« Reply #52 on: January 07, 2010, 09:07:32 AM »

Marc's first two steps are what I have done using blackened brass wire. I also start them in the hole and then paint the tips. Then i press them the rest of the way in.

Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
Tom Neeson
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 107



« Reply #53 on: January 07, 2010, 04:33:31 PM »

Marc
How about using stretched sprue of an appropriately colored plastic. You could still paint them, but not have to worry so much if a little paint scraped off while pushing them in.

Tom
Logged

No Scribed Siding!
RoughboyModelworks
Guest
« Reply #54 on: January 07, 2010, 09:07:20 PM »

Marc:

I think you've nailed it... Wink The newer approach with the styrene nails is very good.

Paul
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5602


« Reply #55 on: January 08, 2010, 03:10:33 AM »

Paul, I thought you had learned your lesson about bad puns on Jacq's thread. You have compounded your affrontery here. I am utterly at a loss about how to deal with you. Obviously standing in the corner has had no effect. Perhaps others could suggest a more effective disciplinary action. -- Russ
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #56 on: January 08, 2010, 04:05:54 PM »

Marc
How about using stretched sprue of an appropriately colored plastic. You could still paint them, but not have to worry so much if a little paint scraped off while pushing them in.

Tom

Tom:
Welcome to the forum.
In general, not a bad idea on the stretched sprue...it also gives you the opportunity to create more/varied sizes if not available in styrene rod.  Being the way I am though, the major concern I would have with the sprue, is getting enough consist. dia material to finish an entire project....I am already running around calipering and sorting the mfg, styrene to make sure it's consist. Roll Eyes Grin.

You would still need to paint the end tip of the sprue though, as the cut surface tends to be whitish...but it would like yu say maybe help insofar as where a side becomes visible.


Marty:
Depending on the scale....I think the styrene has an advantage, as it is easier to flush cut at the back than brass...(unless your brads are not coming all the way through the board)....if you use nippers there is a good chance that they will pull on the brass and sink it in on the front side more than you want...or leave just enough sticking out on the back after the cut that it becomes annoying/interfers when mounting on the framing.

Dan:
Sounds like one heck of a project. I do hope you post a thread on it, I for one would be interested in seeing how it is done.



MR






Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
RoughboyModelworks
Guest
« Reply #57 on: January 08, 2010, 08:57:50 PM »

Paul, I thought you had learned your lesson about bad puns on Jacq's thread. You have compounded your affrontery here. I am utterly at a loss about how to deal with you. Obviously standing in the corner has had no effect. Perhaps others could suggest a more effective disciplinary action. -- Russ
Grin Grin Grin  [scrape, scrape, scrape... moving comfy chair into corner in flagrant display of disobedience and confirming wifi connection with laptop, thong-clad cutie just delivering JD on the rocks] You should know by now Russ that you just can't threaten me with a good time... just ask my wife Wink And if you think the puns are bad, just wait till I get started with the spoonerisms, irony and litotes...

Paul [from the corner, waiting for the hot tub to get to temp]
« Last Edit: January 08, 2010, 09:09:59 PM by Roughboy » Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5602


« Reply #58 on: January 09, 2010, 03:18:20 AM »

At this point nothing remains but to quote my grandmother: "Oy, Gevult!" -- Russ
Logged
marc_reusser
Curmudgeon
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4504



WWW
« Reply #59 on: January 09, 2010, 06:24:35 AM »

Well,....some sorta good news, and some fairly bad news...

The better news.....Rus, these images show the wood coloring muchmore accurately....still off a bit, because I forgot to check the ISO, and it was set at 400 instead of auto....so it made the images grainy, as well as throwing the coloration slightly.


The bad news, is that I spent the evening finishing some more wood pieces , and then using them to continue building the door side and the interior (working on the interior is sort of like working on a ship in a bottle  Lips sealed).....when I was ready to call it quits for the evening I realized something was bugging me....so I checked, and appaerntly I had made a mistake when installing the bench.....I made the spacer shim (the piece that would ensire level and even enstallation), 6 scale inches too tall!!!....so now what was supposed to be a standard 18" bench height, ended up being 24" high....

...and to make things worse, at the time of installation I wanted to make sure that this part would not come loose and rattle around the inside, I fortified the joints where they were not visible to viewing with ACC! Lips sealed Lips sealed......so now I have the lovely dillema of either leaving the odd looking seat height (which will really only be visble through the open door)...or trying to fix it by removing it, and then figuring out some way to disguse whatever wood damage occurs due to the ACC..and hide the ACC residue...both of which will become emminantly visble once the seat is lowered. Huh


...there is a third option...and that is to toss the bugger in the waste bin and move on to s different project.


At the moment I am leaning towards the second.....but it could still be rubbish bin bound if I feel the resulting damage is too great to correct or conceal.


MR


* 18.jpg (98.3 KB, 446x550 - viewed 688 times.)

* 19.jpg (83.79 KB, 419x550 - viewed 750 times.)
Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 ... 16
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!