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Author Topic: 5x5x7 project (1/35 scale)  (Read 107044 times)
shropshire lad
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« Reply #30 on: January 01, 2010, 04:58:37 AM »

  Marc ,

Gene Hunt , from Life On Mars and Ashes to Ashes ? Don't tell us these shows have reached your West Coast backwater already ? How about " He's got fingers in more pies than a leper on a cookery course " ?

  I personally wouldn't be worried about paint bleeding through the boards to the inside as I bet that happened plenty of times in real life . I bet the paint was really sploshed on , with little finesse , when it came to repainting time .

 I am aware of the various different magazines with the words "military" and " modelling" in their titles . The clue in my post was that I used capitals for both words , implying a specific product ,whereas you used capitals to describe a collection of products when you should only have used lower case . Phew, I'm glad we got that cleared up .

   Nick
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« Reply #31 on: January 01, 2010, 10:11:37 AM »

I guess I better work the intertubes more often. Very impressive Marc. Actually, I believe I will be selling all my hand tools, Dremel, airbrush, styrene and I will spend the rest of my days planning models and thinking about how to weather them. There is enough information there to accomplish my new dream. Plus it will avoid the heartbreak of spilling the Tenax 7R on carefully laid out strips of styrene with the thousands of rivets. Again.

John
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John Palecki
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« Reply #32 on: January 01, 2010, 02:57:37 PM »

Marc, have a glance at this :

http://www.militarymodelling.com/news/article.asp?a=4083

 Wink

Franck
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2010, 02:56:52 AM »

Had some time to experiment with some details.

Made NBW's, all washers are .005 styrene (3/16" scale inches); top row is made using laser cut bolt heads from VectorCut, bottom using Grandt.



These were painted Model Master "Flat Black" from a spray can, and then further colored using pigments.

Photo below showing some of the bolt locations (side wall will run all the way down on finished model), I also decided to try adding scale nail-heads to the unpainted side wall boards (unfortunately once you start down this road, you can't really stop or go back Lips sealed)....the nail-heads were made from thin slices of .008 styrene rod, then painted with "Roof Brown".  Not sure how I feel about these yet.... there is definite reoom for improvement.:




An extreme close-up of rotted corner framing area. (most of this will not be visible on finished model  Undecided)





John,
Where-abouts do you excersise the innertubes?

Nick,
Yes, Gloria,....that Gene Hunt. There may be a big pond, and a lot of "fly-over" states, between you and me, and we may still be struggling with getting indoor plumbing, but we do thankfully get BBC....so we are treated to Mr. Hunt and numerous wonderful crime programs...Cracker, Wire in The Blood, Second Sight, MI-5, that Jane Tennyson series......and that wonderfully wierd singing detective show about a Casino at some seaside town.

Franck:
Thanks for the link. I once had that, but lost it...so thanks for posting it again.



MR

« Last Edit: January 04, 2010, 03:15:56 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2010, 06:40:52 AM »

Looks good Marc, I like the mix of fasteners too, the rotted corner is a nice detail (even though unseen)
Not sure about the nails though....they seem a little big, even for cut nails.
What about using a smaller size in a phosphor bronze wire? or strands of electrical wire?
If my math is correct you need a .005" nail head at the largest.
All in all it is very attractive, I cant wait to get back to working with wood!
-Marty
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2010, 09:10:41 AM »

I have been using 3/8 as a general nail head size. Works out to .00078 in O, so you are way off! (grin)

I found .008 brass to be tricky to install...must be interesting in styrene! I also bought several drill bits from Mcmaster...only broke one so far.
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http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
marc_reusser
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« Reply #36 on: January 04, 2010, 02:32:08 PM »

I have been using 3/8 as a general nail head size. Works out to .00078 in O, so you are way off! (grin)


This is 1/35, and as I understand it .010= 3/8 at this scale.....so the .008" dia head should be OK for this. Undecided Huh  Is my math off somewhere? Huh

My next step will by trying to install them....need to get the right sized drill first (and one that cuts real clean and leaves no fuzz at the edges of the hole).....though I do not see pushing such thin styrene onto a hole will be possible.....and as you say that thin of brass is really tricky to work with...what I really hate about the brass at that dia, is there is no easy way to sand it and get a perfectly flat end.

One option if I ever decide to do this again, would be to have some etched or laser cut out of brass....if one could find someone to do them the same way that the MIG bolt heads are done (the brass is etched completely through all around...so no cutting from the sheet is required, everything is held in place on a carrier film on the back of the sheet, and the heads only need to be lifted off)....with this approach , the nail heads could be blackened, then placed on the wood surface, and with a slighly dulled scriber (dulled to the head dia.) could be lightly tapped into the surface...just enough not to cause the wood surface to distort...but enough to make the heads look embedded.


...basically I was just trying to see if it was feasible/worthwhile to do something like this, and get away from the 'hole with bleeding paint" approach.  Smiley...unfortunately, I will have to finish this in this manner now....because it's a bigger pain, to near impossible, to remove them and then touch-up the surface again so it matches again. Undecided


MR
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #37 on: January 04, 2010, 02:40:12 PM »

MY math is off-forgot this was 35th.
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« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2010, 02:54:12 PM »

Nice Mark!

I like the different bolt and washers used and the wood aspect...

The nail heads seems to me good, 0.008", give 7mm scale nail heads in 1:35 scale  Wink,

Franck
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« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2010, 08:19:38 PM »

Looks great to me!
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« Reply #40 on: January 04, 2010, 09:25:27 PM »

HEY... I was saving those bricks for my backyard bbq Marc. Jeez... between you and Chuck filching my stuff I can't keep any of my weathered gear in the backyard.  Wink

The "mystery project" is looking great... particularly like the close-up shot of the partially-clad framework, rotted corner, bolts and so forth. It'll be a shame to cover it completely... perhaps a broken plank where the frame is rotted out, afterall the nails wouldn't hold in rotted wood...

Nice job on the hand-carved bricks too, but what a chore to build anything of any size. You'd have to train a whole crew of willing thong-clad cuties to carve bricks for you... Grin Grin

Paul

« Last Edit: January 04, 2010, 09:31:09 PM by Roughboy » Logged
michael mott
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« Reply #41 on: January 04, 2010, 11:46:15 PM »

marc said
Quote
what I really hate about the brass at that dia, is there is no easy way to sand it and get a perfectly flat end.
I just flush cot some .008thou copper wire and I am having a hard time seeing the end let alone sanding it flat!

Michael
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« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2010, 06:04:00 AM »


Made NBW's, all washers are .005 styrene (3/16" scale inches); top row is made using laser cut bolt heads from VectorCut, bottom using Grandt.


Nice.
How did you make the circular styrene disks? I tried to make a load of such washers in 0-scale once, but had a real hard time getting the disks crisp enough. I Used hole punches for the cutting.

Regards, Håvard H
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« Reply #43 on: January 06, 2010, 01:27:49 AM »

Havard,

Welcome back from your travels. I hope you had an enjoyable and interesting time.

The disks were made using the Waldron "Micro Punch & Die Set", It's not cheap (around $100) but since I purchased it I have made probably 10,000 rivets and such with it, and it is still giving me nice clean disks. Waldron also makes a second set that has larger sized holes, a few that fall between a couple of the Micro Punch sizes.

I also have the Micro-Mark punch & die set which is another series of sizes, but the disks do not come out nearly as clean or crisp as the Waldron set, but they are OK for certain applications.

There is also a Hex P&D set out there...can't recall at the moment who mages it...but it's also around $100 for about 5 sizes.  I have been considering purchasing this set, but the logic tells me that aligning  & driving-through a hex could be a bit fidgety to use, and could  wear crooked or become ill fitting fairly easily if used a lot and great care is not taken when using it.

MR
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« Reply #44 on: January 06, 2010, 05:28:31 AM »

Marc,
Have you already tried using those MIG bolt details before?  I'm just getting myself organised to have a go at etching some brass parts, and I might have a go at that technique with some of the spare fret spaces.  I guess finding a good carrier film that isn't going to be eaten by the ferric chloride is the next trick, but that concept sound good.

Dan
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