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chester
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« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2009, 10:51:59 PM »

Thank you for the info Paul, good read. I can't help but add how impressed I am with the holding properties offered by the newer polyurethane glues on wood (Gorilla glue, etc.) If one can get around the expansion issue, they hold remarkably well. This from someone that began their woodworking career mixing the old fish and hide glues.
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2009, 11:26:03 PM »

Thanks for the good words guys, I'm glad you found it of interest.

Chester, the glues such as Gorilla Glue are quite strong, though I'm not convinced they have their place in a craftsman or model shop. The expansion issue is a drawback but they do seem useful for coarse repair work. In the long run though, it's usually much easier, quicker and more effective to make a clean joint & glue with PVA - much quicker clean up after the joint cures for one thing.

Phil, doing trim work I'm sure you've had to replace many example of gaposis... glad you like the term. We had a few "technical" terms we used such as "mulge factor" that I referred to in a post below and "California Roundover." The last applied to a prevalent trend in the 80s & 90s in furniture design and cabinet work from the west coast where it seemed that whatever or wherever the edge was, it was rounded over! We labeled it California Roundover which was not intended as a complimentary description.   Smiley

Paul
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2009, 12:00:25 AM »

Paul,

You forgot to use the term "Shmooie" (Caulking)...as in the prevalent use of "1/2" Shmooie" to fill moulding joints and spaces in so much of the new construction these days.  Wink Grin


MR
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I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

M-Works
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« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2009, 10:40:48 AM »

That's a good one Marc, haven't heard that before. So are you saying that 1/2" is the current tolerance standard in construction these days  Wink, as in "Just cut it within 1/2" and be quick about it. We've got six more of these to frame this week." Evidently 90 degrees is also no longer considered a right angle.  Wink Grin

We did use "scooch" though, as a term for precise adjustments in accurate positioning of stock before cutting or assembly  Wink Grin, as in "just move that over a scooch so the blade lines up with the cut line." That one however, was not unique to our shop and I believe has come in to fairly common use.

Paul
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Philip Smith
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« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2009, 11:51:27 AM »

scooch- hey take a scooch off this Grin

When I first started in the business 1998 (after the army put me out to pasture) as a nailer we were doing these spec houses for this crappy company. The trim was always short or long and the saw guy would look disgusted when I'd take a stick back and tell him it wasn't right.  They (job super) (saw guy) could care less about fit and we all got to the point of where we would just "nail it" "let the painter get it". Like Marc mentioned 1/2" gaps, out side corners all screwey. I was just thinking OMG I'd wouldn't buy one of these crap houses or have them build a dog house. We'd run thru 3 a day.

Sadly, there was more money in production trim than finish trim. Difference..... screws verses rail bolts.

pinning verses splines.

California roundover. he he, cheap and quick

Philip   
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2009, 08:55:06 PM »


California roundover. he he, cheap and quick

Philip   

Yep, that was the point, apart from the wholly indecisive design solution aspect. These sort of vernacular terms are always entertaining.... Wink

Paul
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chester
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« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2009, 04:50:16 PM »


Yep, that was the point, apart from the wholly indecisive design solution aspect. These sort of vernacular terms are always entertaining.... Wink

Paul

Entertaining yes as long as you aren't the one responsible for the finished product. I have had such things as "This ain't no church" and " you can't see it from my house" thrown at me from time to time when wanting to see a better fit and finish. Not the kind of response a contractor wants to hear from his men. The best retort I can come up with is "I'll pay you what I think it's worth then".
   By the way, the most common term for those discretionary cuts from the younger bunch is nano, as in  "take a nano off"  And we refer to caulking as spoodgie like "spoodgie that hole" or "put some spoodgie in it"
   Back when I started, it was always a pleasure to listen to the old timers as they were always metaphorical. Things were "sharp as a sailor's tongue", "dull as a hoe", "straight as a gutted toad" and "bowed like a fat woman's ass" to name a few. My favorite when viewing a poorly done job was "looks like a dog's breakfast"
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2009, 06:07:06 PM »

Chester:

A dog's breakfast is a tried and true classic... have been using that one for years in all manner of situations when confronted with a particularly appalling piece of work. "Bowed like a fat woman's ass" is a new one on me... I'm going to have to remember that one.

Paul
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JohnP
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« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2009, 08:12:01 PM »

Dave & Paul- I read a bit of CA adhesive science in a research article summary on line. Apparently it is used to cover dinosaur bone fossils but the method was never really proven. The researchers found that acidic bones inhibited CA degradation while alkaline bones accelerated the problem. Hence the baking soda joints on the models mentioned going bad first. Also, butyl based CA lasts the longest. But the summary offered no time frame.

Also RC model airplane folks use AC quite a bit on wood joints but I guess their creations aren't expected to last 100 years for some reason...
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John Palecki
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« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2009, 06:48:31 PM »

Welcome to the forum John. I'm curious about the CA use with dinosaur bones. Were they using it as a sealant or do you know the reason for covering the bones with it? It does seem to have many and varied uses. The CSI forensic folks use it's gaseous qualities to reveal latent fingerprints from surfaces that are otherwise unreadable.

Paul
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JohnP
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« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2009, 06:58:24 PM »

It was a brief summary but it seems they use it for protection and to hold the chips on. It must allow them to store them but keep them available for investigation, unlike the old way of the plaster cast.

Thanks Paul, I always admired the clean presentation of Russ's publications and certainly enjoyed looking at the modeling. So I thought I occasionally could add some wit or wisdom to the group.
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John Palecki
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« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2009, 08:58:51 PM »

John:

Looking forward to your contributions to the forum. Russ is known for being uncompromising in the work he does with his publications, but we try not to tell him that too much, because he just gets to be so difficult to deal with... Wink

It's interesting that the archeologists and archivists are using CA in this manner. It's a basic principle of archivists to not do anything to an artifact that can't be undone without risking the integrity of the artifact. The CA application seems to me like a risky maneuver but I would expect that they've completed some fairly complex chemical studies... one would hope at any rate.

Paul
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jacq01
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« Reply #27 on: December 11, 2009, 08:53:24 AM »


  John,

  welcome.   but with this:
Quote
So I thought I occasionally could add some wit or wisdom to the group.
  your in the wrong place. Grin Grin

  Jacq
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