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Author Topic: Cast Steel Finish w/ Wear Areas  (Read 12770 times)
marc_reusser
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« on: March 20, 2007, 02:30:52 AM »

Though Armor tracks....the technique and application can work elsewhere for "cast steel/iron" parts. They represent newer cast steel that has oxidized but not rusted, and has slightly worn surfaces from recent handling and very limited use. (In my case a vehicle under construction/assembly.)

Scale is 1/48. These come as injection molded, black plastic individual links. Because the castings are very slick/shiny, after clean-up of the sprue connections, they were soaked in white wine vinegar (a mild acid) for about 4 hours, to slightly etch/dull the surface for better paint adhereance. The links were then painted with Model Master polishable "Burnt Steel"; and assembled after about 4 hours of dry time. [NOTE: For it to work properly, the Model-Master burnishable paint needs to be applied with an airbrush.]

The assembled tracks were then given a thinned wash of mixed Tamiya 'NATO Brown' and 'NATO Black' acrylics. Dried with a blow-dryer. This was followed by a heavy dusting of randomly mixed Bragdons 'Medium Rust' and 'Soot' weathering powders; which were then flooded with Grumbacher Odorless thinner to further blend a them and adhere them to the sufaces. Dried with a blowdryer. Once dry, surfaces and areas were burnished with a soft cotton rag, and a stiff flat brush. The rag and the brush help expose areas of the burnishable metal finish underneat the Chalks and paint wash. (On the interior the rag and the brush were drawn in the direction ond use/travel that the surface would experience...thus giving the directional scratches and selected highlighted edges and surfaces).

Marc


* MR_Tiger_Tracks1.jpg (78.9 KB, 550x359 - viewed 913 times.)

* MR_Tiger_Tracks2.jpg (94.58 KB, 550x451 - viewed 936 times.)
« Last Edit: March 22, 2007, 02:48:31 PM by marc_reusser » Logged

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MikeC
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2007, 06:59:42 PM »

Looks good, Marc.

Humbrol also makes buffable "metal" paints, which I like quite a bit because they can be applied with either a brush or an airbrush and then buffed with a soft cloth after having dried. I have used their "Gunmetal" quite a bit and have found it easy to work with. When brushed on, it's self-leveling and dries fairly quickly - ideal if you're in a hurry to get some small (or indivdiual) parts done. The only thing I don't like about the Humbrol line is the small tins with the pry-off lids. No matter how clean I try to keep the lids, eventually they will become just crudded up enough to stop sealing the tin properly, and then the paint begins to dry out.

Matt aluminium    27001
Polished aluminium    27002
Polished steel    27003
Gunmetal    27004
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2007, 07:35:25 PM »

Thanks Mike,

I too like the Humbrol paints and completely agree with your assement of them...as well as the lid issues. I also really like some of their colors.

The only reason I am tending to stay away from them for my large surfaces, is because of the finishing steps and washes I am currently employing/experimenting with. Since they are oil based paints they tend to soften when I apply Turpentine based washes and filters, which causes me some issues during the fading and weathering steps.

Thanks for the list of their metallics....I now realize that I have none of these.....Hmmmm...guess I have to dig them up somewhere. Undecided

Marc
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Hector Bell
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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2007, 01:26:35 PM »

Hi all, Humbrol recently went broke taking Airfix with them, though that has been sold.
I don't know what has happened to Humbrol on its own.  Humbrol products have invariably let me down over a very long time of being forced to use some of them, so if you can get Floquil, I recommend you do.  Once you have a flat finish you can weather with gouache and powders, both of which are completely matt.  Cheers, Hector
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2007, 03:04:50 PM »

Here is another version of weathered cast steel I am working on....yes tank tracks....but the idea can be used elsewhere...say that tractor, buldozer, mine tip cars, dinkey drums, winches/hoists, etc.

Tracks always seem like a daunting task on a tracked vehicle. Many modelers tend to represent their tracks with rusty finish/appearance with only a few dry-brushed, or graphite bare metal highlight areas at the exterior of the track; and many completely ignore or forget to do the worn metal areas/surfaces at the interior side of the track where  the drive sprockets, idlers, and road wheels come in contact.

I take great issue with this approach. Though it may be seen as stylized, or interpretive, it is generally incorrect and prototypically inaccurate. Most modelers appear to copy from display and museum vehicles whose tracks have sat idle for a long time, and oxidized/rusted over time.

This image shows the tracks of a 38t as on static display in a museum. Note the oxidation/rust.



These images show the tracks of the same 38t after a short cross country excursion. Note the lack of "red/orange" rust color. The rust has worn off very quickly, to a mix of bare metal, old brown "deep oxidation" and dust/dirt; giving the outside of the tracks a soft warm grey/brown shade.
Note also the  lack of any rust on the interior track surface. Note how areas are polished/worn where they come in contact with moving parts.

     

     


Looking at these examples I decided to take a somewhat different approach to the tracks, than frequently shown/described elsewhere.

I decided rather than painting the tracks, and then highlighting the worn and exposed steel parts by dry-brushing with metallic paint, or using graphite. The idea was to paint the tracks a steel base color, and then "wear" the over painted colors off, to expose the steel color underneath; like prototype tracks, and like is done with Friul metal tracks.

The first step was to airbrush all the individual plastic track links (prior to assembly) with Alclad II Lacquer "Steel", then overspray with a light dusting of Alclad II "Chrome" to lightly accentuate the high points and edges.




These are two test pieces that were done to see/experiment with what the process would be. The photos render the red/brown hue a bit stronger and more opaque than in reality, where more subtle suggestions of the underlying steel gray color can be seen.

After acrylic washes, the piece on the left was dusted with "Rottenstone" and washed into the crannies with Grumbacher "Odorless Thinner" (note to self: odorless thinner attacks/softens the Alclad II paints  Undecided ), this was followed with a dusting of MIG "Europe Dust" #P208, which ended up being a bit more yellow than I had hoped for, and hinted at more of a "rust" finish, rather than dust.

The section on the right was dusted with a mixture of MIG "Europe Dust" #P208, & "Panzer Grey (Fading)" #P305, and yielded a better dust color for my eventual needs.




......step by step, to get to the above finish to follow. Grin

Marc
« Last Edit: June 03, 2007, 03:11:51 PM by marc_reusser » Logged

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marc_reusser
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« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2007, 04:12:59 AM »

On the exterior of the track, the low spots and recesses were colored using very thinned washes of acrylic paints. The first wash was Tamiya "Nato Black" (XF-69). When thoroughly dry, this was followed by several more washes, consisting of random mixtures/shades of Tamiya "Nato Black" (XF-69), "Flat Brown" (XF-10), and Vallejo "Leather Brown" (#872). Each wash layer was allowed to dry prior to applying the next layer. Once The washes had the look and coverage desired, a soft rag dampened with water diluted 70% isopropyl alcohol, was used to clean any wash residue that might have settled on the high spots/contact surfaces.




Marc
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2007, 05:58:42 AM »

Marc

That just came out perfect the coloring you achieve is unbelievable.  Your threads are a delight to follow and learn from.

Jerry
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2007, 08:27:28 AM »

Excellent as usual...I wonder if the armor folkes have ever heard of rottenstone? Wink

CD
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« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2007, 01:07:41 PM »

I seem to learn more here, from the very few who contribute, than from any other site I visit. Thanks, guys. -- Russ
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Hector Bell
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« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2007, 09:00:38 AM »

Hi guys,  The armour boys can certainly teach us something about techniques and sheer application.  Do they ever sleep?!  Iam just starting to contemplate the real scenics on my canal lock/NG rail diorama and will report on such things as water....deep/shallow, dirty/clean, brick, stone roof slates and rough grass.  Having just dragged the last of the old oakum from the seams of my boat I'm going to experiment with the stuff for rough grass.  That and the fur from our long haired Shar-Pei dog (Marc!)  It's so long since I've done any scenic stuff, I'm really quite nervous.  Cheers, Hector
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