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Author Topic: Designing my next building  (Read 23122 times)
MrBrownstone
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« Reply #45 on: October 22, 2009, 01:18:56 AM »

Them windows look pretty good to me Ray...

What did you end up doing to get them all in?

Mike
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« Reply #46 on: October 22, 2009, 06:55:06 PM »

Thanks Mike. I used a fine paintbrush to apply Testor's "Clear Parts Cement" along the inside edges of the window frames. I also added a little bit along the outer edges of the "glass", to ensure a good seal. Then I used tweezers to hold the "glass" and maneuver it into place. This was a little tricky because the windows are so tall, and even the smallest sideways movement tended to smudge a little glue over onto the exposed areas of glass.

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« Reply #47 on: October 22, 2009, 11:02:55 PM »

Here are a couple closeup photos I shot this afternoon...   Nothing special but I liked how they looked:       
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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #48 on: October 22, 2009, 11:16:43 PM »

Hey Ray,

It's looking GOOD!

I like the first photo... with the angle on the space between the buildings. Nice shot

I like your eye candy... very inspiring  Grin

Mike
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« Reply #49 on: October 23, 2009, 01:52:09 PM »


  Ray,

  very convincing.... good photography too.  NO REFLECTIONS  Grin Grin

  Jacq
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« Reply #50 on: October 23, 2009, 05:53:57 PM »

Thanks. I'm working on improving my photography. In this case I had to shoot those pics pretty quick before losing what little sun there was on the buildings. This time of year the sunlight only reaches them for a short time, and only from behind. Soon they'll get no sun at all, which makes the winter season a very frustrating time for photos.

Speaking of photography, I made a really good reflector several months ago, by gluing some crinkled aluminum foil to a large sheet of foam core. But so far I still haven't been able to use it... there's usually no one at hand who can hold it for me, and no way to securely mount it where I need it.



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« Reply #51 on: October 26, 2009, 09:07:35 PM »

No new pics, but here's a brief update...

I built up some electric meters, smoke jacks and a few other small exterior details. Since I'll need these for many of my buildings I decided to mold them so I can cast duplicates. Then I discovered that my silicone mold compound has turned to rubber in the jar. Doh!  I hate the short shelf-life of that stuff.

A while back someone posted pics here of some bottles they turned from acrylic rod. My first attempt at this several months ago failed, but those pics and the info supplied inspired me to try again. Success! I've managed to make a half dozen or so already, just between other projects. Also, I remembered reading the posts in another forum from the Polish aircraft modeler, who mentioned that he used toothpaste to polish parts. So I used that to smooth the bottle after shaping them. Turned out real nice.

Now I'm working on a swamp cooler (old fashioned evaporative cooler that predates modern air-conditioning). Maybe I'll mold that too, when my shipment of mold compound gets here.  Lots of old desert buildings used swamp coolers.

Last night I found out that three of the lights inside my rock shop had burned out prematurely, so I'm replacing those and trying figure out how to prevent it happening again.

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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #52 on: October 26, 2009, 09:21:08 PM »

Lots of old desert buildings used swamp coolers.

Not just in the desert Ray... swamp coolers are still plentiful throughout the central valley here. You can still buy them here at Home Depot. They tend to be most prevalent in the older and/or less affluent neighborhoods as they are generally less expensive than air conditioners. I tried a small one once in my garage in an attempt to cool it during the summer. Didn't work worth a damn except it made everything damp, machines were corroding, it was a mess... really was like a swamp in there. Got rid of it and replaced it with a portable AC unit which worked like a charm and was worth every penny of the cost.

Paul
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #53 on: October 26, 2009, 10:19:49 PM »

Ray,

Thise close-up photos are awsome....looks like the real 1:1 stuff I have seen.

Re. The lights.....have you considered LED's...they should have a long lifespan.

M
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« Reply #54 on: October 26, 2009, 10:48:49 PM »

I'd love to be able to use LEDs, but there are too many obstacles. First is size -- they're a LOT bigger than a grain of rice bulb. Then there's the leads -- bulbs have of a pair of thin, closely spaced wires that can be run through a narrow brass tube or otherwise disguised/hidden.  Can't do that with an LED, which has those thick, widely spaced metal prongs.

The wiring is more complicated too, and I haven't a clue as to what kind of resistors you're supposed to use or how to use them.

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« Reply #55 on: October 27, 2009, 01:52:01 AM »

I think we're talking two different types/brands of LED.....the ones that I have seen (in person) are around 1mm in size, and have two hair-thin wire leads.....come in multiple colors, and are extremely bright. Unfortunately I can't recall the name of the mfr at the moment.


M
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« Reply #56 on: October 27, 2009, 02:12:37 AM »

Interesting. I've never seen LEDs that small.

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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #57 on: October 27, 2009, 11:04:45 AM »

Hey Ray,

I think the Radio Shack Catalog has the 1.5mm led's in it.. I know I have seen them that small as well

they put them on computer main boards too... and they are smaller than 1mm (so I know they make them that small and smaller even)


Then there is always fiber optic's (you would have to polish the ends more round to produce a broader light... but could be done)
or even put the fiber end into the grain of rice bulb. (lighted bulb but with fiber light source)
single light source for many lights

Mike



« Last Edit: October 27, 2009, 01:11:08 PM by MrBrownstone » Logged
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