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Author Topic: Designing my next building  (Read 23164 times)
Ray Dunakin
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« on: August 28, 2009, 11:57:08 AM »

The past few days I've been trying to decide on a design for the next building in my town of Dos Manos. It will be positioned next to the rock shop, with stairs in between leading up to another structure higher on the hill. I'm using an old 3D modeling program to work out the design.

At first I was thinking of making two narrow buildings, something like this:



The problem is that the two buildings would have to be extremely narrow, bordering on caricature. My first two structures are already very small, so I don't want to push it too much, especially since the next buildings will be much larger.

So here's the design I came up with for a single building:




I think the proportions are much better with this one. What do you think?

BTW, the textures shown here are just a rough approximation.


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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2009, 08:04:19 PM »

Ok here are two shots of the site:




I tried dropping in the 3D model images to get a rough idea of how they might look. I know I didn't get the perspective right, especially on the first one, so I'm not sure how accurate these are. But both designs look pretty good:





Now I'm not sure which one I like better!
 
 
BTW, the CG models are just simple mockups. I didn't bother adding all the fine detail that will be on the actual models.


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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2009, 10:28:46 PM »

Hey Ray,

I like the second choice... it seems to blend into your current look/feel better

the arches on the first choice seem to take away from the timeline deplicted. it looks (architectually more modern then the surounding enviornment) IMO

maybe my lack of experience in modeling but I am just saying what comes to thought...

I still LOVE the rock shop...with that amazing interior

your garden lay-out has made me think about my back yard in a different way.  Roll Eyes  (very inspiring Ray)

Mike




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finescalerr
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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2009, 02:00:13 AM »

I also prefer the second building. It's size seems more convincing and its overall design seems to fit well with what you already have. -- Russ
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2009, 05:10:30 AM »


   I'll second ( or thirdth ??) the two other opinions. This will definitely not turn the total into a possible caricature set.

   Jacq
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2009, 08:41:12 PM »

Hi Ray,
Definitely, what's behind door #2.
Nice proportion and style.  I don't know what you
have in mind for that building but to me it looks like the
perfect saloon and hotel.
cool project.

Later
Rick Marty
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2009, 11:48:53 PM »

I built a very simple mockup of the two smaller buildings. I didn't bother mocking up the second floor of the building on the left...



I determined that the second floor of both buildings could be extended back onto the rocks, giving each of them a good five inches of additional depth. So I reworked the 3D models. I eliminated the stairs, and replaced them with a wall and door -- the stairs to the second floor are now "implied", somewhere in the building. I also recessed the second floor on the wooden building a little; and I replaced the brick building's arches with rectangular doors and windows.

As before, I did not bother putting in all the fine details such as doors and window mullions; and the textures shown are not necessarily the materials that will be used on the final models.




Then I pasted the CG image into a photo of the town site:




I like this version for three reasons...

1. Extending the buildings back onto the hillside ties the town into the landscape and also breaks up the "row of boxes" look a little bit.

2. The added depth makes the narrow buildings seem a little more plausible.

3. Using two narrow buildings here, creates a nice transition to the larger buildings that will be added later.


Any thoughts/comments?


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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2009, 10:21:02 PM »

I made one more 3D mockup:




As you can see I made a few modifications to the building on the left. I also changed the building on the right from brick to stone, and went back to arched windows for the second floor.  As before, this image still doesn't have every detail in place, but it's close enough now that I've finally started work on the actual models.

I'm building the left structure first. I began by building up the shops from styrene strips:















I've finished the windows that go on either side of the door. Next, I'll make the door and join the three assemblies together.


BTW, the large wooden building that everyone liked will be built eventually, in a different location.


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« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2009, 02:04:11 AM »

Looks very good so far. -- Russ
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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2009, 02:27:05 AM »

Hey Ray,

Nice . . . Very Nice... did you create the wood grain?
or do you get the raw materials with the grain?

the work looks nice and clean.

Mike
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2009, 11:22:51 AM »

I created the wood grain myself. First I scraped the styrene strips with a fine-toothed razor saw. Then I pulled them through a folded over piece of 50-grit sandpaper.


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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2009, 04:21:39 PM »

That's a great tip,

I will have to try that..

Mike
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2009, 08:00:36 PM »

I've finished assembling the shop windows and door:







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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2009, 01:07:10 AM »

Hey Ray,

that shop frontage came out really nice...

did you mill down the edges of the center panels? or is there another piece attached? it is a nice touch..

Can't wait to see this build...I am sure there will many things for me to learn from this.. thanks for posting/sharing

you also explain things which is good for guys like me... new to learning these kinds of techniques.

Mike
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #14 on: September 08, 2009, 06:31:34 AM »

That facade looks really nice, Ray.  Love the wood grain.
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