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Author Topic: Car Cart (Painting Begins)  (Read 20417 times)
jacq01
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« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2009, 07:56:34 AM »


   Marc,

   there appears a light " blob" on the inside of the roof, that doesn't have the jagged transition as the rest. Runner is not the correct word, it's more a dried out spot of light rust.  It is the sharp transition and the distinct shape that attracted my
 attention.

  Jacq
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« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2009, 02:43:43 AM »

Ahh... Ok...that's fixable (or hide-able)...I thought you meant a "runner" like part of the vehicle or cart frame.

So here is Where this is:.....I have also found a goat, that I think would be a good addition tied to the rear of the cart.

The body has been painted as follows:
Base coat of Tamiya XF-64 "Red Brown"
A light spotty, and very thinned, layer of Life Color:UA702 "Rust Base Color" from the Diorama Series.
A filter of Windsor Newton artists oil color #33 "Prussian Blue"
A thinned and worked wash using MIG "Neutral Wash" & MIG thinner.
A light and spotty sponged application of Life Color:UA702 "Rust Base Color" from the Diorama Series.
A slight spot dusting application of Bragdons "rust" powders.

I was trying to achieve that look of sun-burnt metal that has been sitting in a desert climate for years, and has developed that slightly mottled darkish brown finish that also has a slight sheen to it, and only shows minor amounts of fresh oxidation.









In the last image one can also see the correction to the body where the bumper would pass through, to better match a real VW Body. I also removed the left tail-ligt, and still need to drill the bolt and wiring holes where it used to be.

I am unsure if the rust finish/effect is working, and will work with what I have in mind for the finished model...so I am experimenting with the possibility of doing a heavily chipped and worn paint-job....so I did a quick experiment using a modified version of the "Hairspray Technique". Instead of using straight hairspray, I used a 50/50 mixture of hairspray and Gum Arabic, applied in a thin layer with an airbrush. This was then airbrushed over with a solid coat of Tamiya acrylic, once dry, I used the air eraser with baking soda, to slightly pit the paint....then using different brushes (to see the different effects) and water, "chipped" the color coat away. I wasn't trying to get any specific look....I was mainly trying to see if the addition of the Gum Arabic would make the hairspray come off easier and/or differently.

Once the chipping was done to simulate some discoloration, I went in with a 0/15 brush and "mapped" some light areas of Vallejo Flesh and yellow colors onto the remaining Tamiya spots.

This side was removed with a short stiff 0/10 brush.




This side was removed with a regular 1/4 wide flat brush.




The Gum Arabic mixed into the hairspray does make the paint easier to remove.

I am still unsure though whether I will be doing a chipped look on the car.


Marc
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jacq01
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« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2009, 10:42:27 AM »

   Marc,

   Looking great, wonder when the "zoo"will be complete and painted  Cheesy. Cheesy
   This is not qualifying in the abandonded challenge as it the VW is in prime use   Wink  Grin Grin

    Jacq

   
« Last Edit: March 07, 2009, 10:45:27 AM by jacq01 » Logged

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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2009, 03:19:34 PM »

Marc:

The EPA will love this.  I'm assuming the goat is an auxiliary air-cooled power supply and waste-recycling option (damn things will eat anything!).  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

Paul
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« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2009, 06:42:42 PM »

Here is the next step In the painting of the cart.

I had some requests to show a better SBS of the rust and chipping method....so I did this for this. Sorry that the images are a bit off color, but I did not have the time to do photo set-ups while working through this.

Here is the base color of Floquil "Roof Brown" airbrush edged with a medium rust toned Vallejo acrylic .




Next step was to determine where I wanted to mask and create the lighter rust pattern. Random sized ground pieces of salt were applied over lightly dampened surfaces.




The Kosher sea-salt was ground to various sizes using an old pepper-mill; each surface/area/panel was then dampened seperately using a flat brush; the salt was then apllied using a small PE scoop, to better place/control the salt application.




A light coat of Life-Color light rust (from the "Diorama Series" weathering set) was applied with an airbrush, in various intensities.




The salt was removed using two various stiffness brushes.





A solid coat of Teseme hairspray was applied.




Thin coats of Life-Color acrylic color were applied. I used two shades to give me some variation in the final chipping.The Dust color being the primary color...applied over the Light Blue.




Next came the chipping. The primary tools for this were the two small cut down/stiff britle brushes. The toothpick was used for some touch-up and detail chipping The softer brush was used where needed to slight dampen the working area/location. Individual areas/panels were chipped one at a time, the surface was lightly dampened (not dripping/running wet) with the larger brush, the small stiff bristle brush was dipped into a cup of water, and then used to slowly work the dampend area/paint surface till the paint started to chip. (loose paint collecteng on the brush was rinsed off in a second cup of water, any loose pieces, paint sludge, or water on the model surface during the process, was dabbed up using a lint free cotton rag.) [The reason for the engine cover and one fender being devoid of chips is because they will be painted another color.]. Where needed detail chips, small edging rework, and such was done using a damp tooth-pick.





Marc

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marc_reusser
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« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2009, 02:51:44 AM »

A bit more progress....


Some mapping of the chips, using off white, pink and yellow Vallejo acrylics.




The different colored fender and Engine compartment cover. I am happy with the fender color, but I hink the blue went a bit too grey on me when it dried, compared to manufacturers colors.



As I post this I also noticed that I forgot to mask the rusty Oval and drill the two holes, on the left fender where the tail-light used to be.

Marc
« Last Edit: April 20, 2009, 03:42:02 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2009, 10:15:03 AM »

Excellent SBS and results!. Don't forget to darken the louvers a bit.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2009, 12:58:49 PM »

Most satisfactory. And the gray-blue doesn't bother me at all. Blue fades. -- Russ
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« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2009, 01:03:49 PM »

Marc,

Excellent SBS for what is shown here and for what I have read on the MIG forum(with my English-Dutch dictionary beside me  Grin) Sure going to try this
One question thoug. For the best result for the layers of paint, it is best to use a airbrush? Or is just the common brush good enough, bringing on the paint thinned enough.

Leon
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« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2009, 01:39:14 PM »

Thanks guys,

Chuck: That's a thing that has been bedevelling me. Sometimes when you go back in and paint or darken those types of areas, the come off looking hokey or ...well...painted. I really shoild have thinned ot the plastic from behind at the very beginning, so that they would be real openings.  Undecided

Russ: I was unfortunately trying to get that very boring middle blue (not the powder blue...though that would have worked also) that I used to see VW's in in europe during the 70's. The yellow is that ugly sunny-yellow color that they used to sell them in here and in South America (don't know if they had that color in Europe).

Leon; Though I have never tried a brush for either the salt or the hairspray technique, the basic mechanics and fluid/material interactions pretty much dictate that you need to use either an airbrush or a spray can. If you try brushing a paint over the salt, you will dislodge most of it, and the paint will run under and around the salt thus enacapsulating it or disolving it into the paint.....in either case ruining not creating he desired effect and potentially ruining the paint finish. The problem with the harspray is sim. the wetness of the paint and the action of the brush will disolve/soften the hairspray, and mix/bond the paint and hairspray together, creating a "sludge" (messy mixture) that will likely result in a horrific brush stroke mess on the surface....and will then not chip as intended (if at all).

Marc


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John McGuyer
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« Reply #25 on: April 21, 2009, 05:33:12 PM »

Beware the exhaust.

John
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #26 on: April 21, 2009, 06:44:34 PM »

Marc

Nice goat!!  But the car is just beautiful.  Great lessons being learned here.

Jerry
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« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2009, 10:16:06 AM »

so is this ONE horsepower???  Roll Eyes     Craig    Mich
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #28 on: August 15, 2009, 10:47:51 PM »

That salt technique is the best thing to come along in ages. 
Car guys use it a lot on 1/25th scale junkers with fantastic results.
It really turned out great on the VW.

Thanks for the hairspray shots, too.  This model is getting really good!
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« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2009, 12:17:38 AM »

Craig: it has goat back-up just in case  (sort of like nitrous).

Ken: I had seen it around but never really tried, or fully understood it, till Virgil Suarez blew into the MIG forum and did several great SBS using the technique. It's another great tool to have in ones box.



Marc
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