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Author Topic: Yorke´s Stone House  (Read 17729 times)
lab-dad
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« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2009, 06:55:40 AM »

very kool!
Improving in each picture!
I like what you have done, cant wait to see it planted.
-Marty
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2009, 05:30:19 AM »

Beautiful job, Lucas. 
The color on the stonework is very convincing, as are all the other elements.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2009, 01:05:30 PM »

I may be in the minority but I think the model looks too "dingy", as though somebody had dipped the whole building in charcoal or ashes. Although that effect is less pronounced than on Lucas' previous model, the weathering approach seems to be a shortcut for toning down overstated streaks and basic coloring. To my eye, it detracts from the overall appearance.

My suggestion would be to develop a different weathering technique. India ink washes have their place but, generally, washing down an entire model is not their best use.

Instead, on the next model, I would choose my base colors more carefully (avoid making them too strong) and keep the weathering more subtle as you complete each step. Pay more attention to actual railroad cars and structures. Refer to photos. It is very unusual, for example, to find heavy rust streaks running down the entire front wall of any building, especially when what causes them may be only one nail!

Similarly, I find a too much variation in the stone and wood coloring. Such things usually are not blatant; they should not resemble a patchwork quilt.

I am surprised that more experienced modelers on this forum have not pointed out these areas needing improvement. How can somebody learn if we don't take the trouble to teach? Compliments may be flattering but we should encourage improvement, not reinforce the status quo.

Russ

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MrBrownstone
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« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2009, 03:00:39 PM »

hello Lucas,

I have a couple of pictures for you...

I believe Ink washing should not really change the color of the stone. (just my personal opinion)
The way I paint .... I find myself not having to ink it...and if so it is usually a very light/diluted wash

Hope this helps

Mike


* not inked.jpg (67.43 KB, 802x318 - viewed 497 times.)

* inked.jpg (80.11 KB, 821x368 - viewed 487 times.)
« Last Edit: June 08, 2009, 03:05:09 PM by MrBrownstone » Logged
MrBrownstone
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« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2009, 03:18:23 PM »

Lucas,


Another color, One is inked and one is not

hope it helps

Mike


* not inked_02.jpg (66.85 KB, 1021x322 - viewed 465 times.)

* inked_02.jpg (73.74 KB, 939x338 - viewed 480 times.)
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lucas gargoloff
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« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2009, 04:45:27 PM »

Many thanks for your help guys, I really apreciate! I know when painted the stones, it was been washed with black nk, and maybe it could change the colour of the stones, I wanted to do more darken stones ans this was I tried. Maybe for something it don´t looks as I like, but your help gives me another visual point of what I really have to do in the next.
Thanks again!!
Lucas
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Lucas Gargoloff - Argentina
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« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2009, 08:04:58 PM »

Lucas,

I have to agree with the others about the "darkness" and "drabness" of the model......it seems more at home in a Soviet industrial city, than the west. I think you are going much too dark right from the start...and then washing too heavily and evenly.

FWIW, here is a structure that was built by fellow Terrapin group member Doug Ramos...it has similar material and colors as yours....and is in a similarly wearthered state.....but note that it has more variety and life to, and between, the surfaces and materials.


Marc


* DR_WPepperStore1.jpg (47.83 KB, 474x550 - viewed 526 times.)

* DR_WPepperStore2.jpg (56.99 KB, 554x543 - viewed 501 times.)

* DR_WPepperStore3.jpg (49.38 KB, 505x529 - viewed 487 times.)

* DR_WPepperStore4.jpg (53.97 KB, 589x545 - viewed 485 times.)
« Last Edit: June 08, 2009, 08:06:46 PM by marc_reusser » Logged

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« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2009, 08:12:27 PM »

Here is a brick building by Doug Ramos.  Note again, it is weathered/aged to about the same dillapidation as you like to do....and has the same darkness of brick that you seem to like...but note that the various surfaces and materials have been weathered to different degrees, and with different colors/shades/materials.

Marc


* DR_BrickStore1.jpg (79.92 KB, 535x509 - viewed 505 times.)
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« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2009, 02:05:03 AM »

  I agree with Uncle and Marc...

 nothing wrong with a wel executed model, but it lacks realism.
 
  Have a good understanding where the building is positioned.
 Get a good idea of the weather, climate and think of all the influences on the materials of the building. 
 The bleaching effect of the sun, the effect of the wind and/or water.

  If you take these things into account  the building becomes alive, a challenge to your colour selection and the strive for realism.     Think of Marc's "trooper" in the Sands of time topic.       Without hesistation you recognise the location, the effect of nature......... That is the ultimate goal of our building and weathering efforts. ( at least for me )

 Succes with the next exercise

 Jacq
« Last Edit: June 09, 2009, 02:07:30 AM by jacq01 » Logged

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lab-dad
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« Reply #24 on: June 09, 2009, 07:43:13 AM »

I wonder if some dusting with tan powders would lighten the color?
Dare I say it, possibly some very light dry brushing with tans and ochers? shhh dont tell anyone I used the "DB" words!
-anonymous
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lucas gargoloff
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« Reply #25 on: June 09, 2009, 07:54:09 AM »

I´m very happy with your help guys, even been a nice kit, I know I made some mistakes.
Yeap, I recognize it... have to fix it... but how?? I think the same as you Marty, maybe some drybrush with ochres and other light colours.
Thanks again.
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Lucas Gargoloff - Argentina
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« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2009, 02:18:03 PM »

 Been reading the post here and I think Lucas is doing a great job. You have to remember were he is and the area he models. It is not the dry American west but wet rainy Argentina. So wood would weather to a darker gray/black then if in say Colorado, and they have different types of stone also. If he was doing Colorado/New Mexico then yes it's to dark, but were he is and here in the Northwest wood tends to be darker and covered with a green moss.
rich
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2009, 02:43:02 PM »

....I kinda like the dark, less-varied tones..... 
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jacq01
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« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2009, 03:14:19 PM »


 
Quote
wet rainy Argentina.
 

   In the north I agree with you, but going south of Bahia toward Patagonia you'll encounter the dry arid area as harsh as New Mexico / Colorado.
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« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2009, 03:25:43 PM »

Rainy Argentina!......I guess it depends in which part (Argentina being the 8th largest country in the world)....the Pampas and the Patagonian Desert certainly not...nor towards the Andes/Chile. Wink Grin.. ( If not mistaken, I believe they filmed the Star Wars Desert scenes in Argentina)......I do understand the point you are getting at...just giving you a hard time. Wink


Lucas:
I think you should call this one done & fine, and move on to the next project. I do not say this in a negative way...but in a warning sense....the only thing that can occur at this point is that the project begins to get "overworked" and start looking bad....you start to get too many layers of paint, too many finishes, too many effects, etc. (I have been there many times.....remember recently the 1/35 gas mech. loco that I washed off and started all over on Undecided )

It is difficult for me to suggest exactly what to change/do differently......though throwing away (or at least putting away) the ink/dark wash is a definite.......I would be very interested/curious in seeing a very detailed SBS (and/or description) of exactly how you are approaching the finishing, what materials and how you are applying them. This is where I think you may be causing yourself some issues, and I think maybe some changes can be made to give you the look you like want but also have a more diverse refined appearance between the different construction materials (parts of the structure).

One thing to consider when painting a model is what is known as "scale effect".....the need to lighten the colors and finishes you use to be more appropriate to a scale model. (general practice is lighter by at least 10 to 20% than the original).....in real life that concept is the difference of what a color appears like at 1' and at 48' (for O scale).


Marc





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