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Author Topic: Oregon Portage Railroad Oregon Pony  (Read 49738 times)
Scratchman
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« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2009, 12:03:02 AM »

This is a photo of the core for the bottom part of the boiler.



This is a photo of the core for the water tank.(looking at the bottom) with styrene on the top and sides.



Gordon Birrell


http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/

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marc_reusser
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« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2009, 01:33:47 AM »

Very interesting.

You don't experience any problems over time with difference of expansion between the wood and styrene due to humidity...or shrinkage from drying?


Marc
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jacq01
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« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2009, 01:49:58 AM »


   
Quote
problems over time with difference of expansion between the wood and styrene due to humidity...or shrinkage from drying?

    If fully sealed by glued with a styrene top and bottom it should not give problems, unless very high temperatures  expands the moisture inside.

  Jacq
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2009, 05:15:55 AM »

Very nice wood work, Gordon! 
Starting with such a solid foundation sure makes life a lot easier.
------------------------------------------------------------------
EDIT:  I posted this based on the photos on Page 3, then
went back and saw the boiler on Page 2:

Holy Smokes, Gordon - that's insane!!!!
« Last Edit: June 08, 2009, 05:19:33 AM by Ken Hamilton » Logged

Scratchman
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« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2009, 05:49:33 AM »

Marc, I don't know if this will be a problem or not. I have other tanks with the solid wood core that are four or five years old and I can't see any problem with them. The tanks on  my Michigan California Shay Are almost forty years old and I can see no problem with them. So only time will tell. I do live in a very dry place and maybe this helps.

Gordon Birrell

  http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2009, 06:07:45 AM »

I've laminated styrene to wood cores with no long-term issues,
and we can get pretty humid here in New Jersey. 
Such small pieces of wood shouldn't create any problems.
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Scratchman
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« Reply #36 on: June 08, 2009, 06:26:11 PM »

I have got the boiler and water tank ready for paint. Here are two photos.





Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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finescalerr
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« Reply #37 on: June 08, 2009, 07:55:24 PM »

When you start building, Gordon, you don't mess around! -- Russ
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jacq01
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« Reply #38 on: June 09, 2009, 02:22:16 AM »


  Now I understand why rivets are in short supply in the hobbyshops........................ Cheesy

  I don't spend more words on it... save my superlatives for the end

   Jacq
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #39 on: June 10, 2009, 04:22:54 PM »

You never post a picture that isn't worth being thoroughly studied, Gordon. Some for the ideas they contain, some simply for the pleasure.
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Frederic Testard
Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #40 on: June 10, 2009, 05:16:16 PM »

It's really good to see these pieces before paint, to study & appreciate
the different materials used in construction.  Thanks, Gordon.
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #41 on: June 10, 2009, 06:52:08 PM »

Gordon

Wow this is awesome!!  Just one question is the word "sleep" in your vocabulary!!  Hell its on;y taken a week to get this far most of us would still be doing rivets.

Jerry
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George Carlin
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« Reply #42 on: June 11, 2009, 02:10:20 AM »

Would any member of or visitor to this forum disagree that Gordon is a world class modeler? -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #43 on: June 11, 2009, 12:59:10 PM »

Not me!  I would still be on the floor looking for the rivits that flicked off.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #44 on: June 11, 2009, 03:23:32 PM »

Would any member of or visitor to this forum disagree that Gordon is a world class modeler? -- Russ
Sorry, I have no time for this, I'm too busy playing with my Legos...
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Frederic Testard
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