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Author Topic: The Corliss project  (Read 72740 times)
TRAINS1941
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« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2009, 06:45:05 AM »

-MJ

Beautful workmanship.  Looking forward to the next piece thanks for letting us all seeing the progress as you move along.

Jerry
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2009, 05:27:52 AM »

There's nothing better than watching a beautiful piece of scratchbuilding come together.
Fantastic work, Marty.
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lab-dad
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« Reply #17 on: May 31, 2009, 02:06:48 PM »

The eccentric is done, was a steep learning curve! (but then I have no formal training)
As they say; Third times a charm.
Worked on the large pillow block today.
-Marty





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     Martin G. Jones Photography
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jacq01
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« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2009, 02:37:02 PM »


   Marty,

   wow......you're a fast learner .

   Jacq
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #19 on: May 31, 2009, 05:29:26 PM »

Fantastic work, Marty. What kind of tools do you use for this kind of work. I guess this metal modelling requires some heavy tools.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #20 on: May 31, 2009, 11:28:24 PM »

Wow!  Beautifully done. Really clean and crisp. This will paint-up beautifully (though almost a shame to paint it),


Marc
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finescalerr
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« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2009, 02:04:15 AM »

Utter jewelry. I am reeling in stunned disbelief. -- Russ
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2009, 05:39:46 AM »

-MJ

What an outstanding job.  Workmanship at its finest.  Like Marc said it will be a shame to paint it.

Jerry
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George Carlin
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« Reply #23 on: June 01, 2009, 06:36:47 AM »

Thanks everyone!
It has been a fun project so far.
Like the Plymouth each piece is a model in and of itself.
Every part requires a new trick, tool, fixture, jig or technique.

Fredrick; I am using my Sherline lathe with the milling column attached when needed. (sherline dot com)
I do have access to a larger Clausen and a bridgeport if needed but these parts work well on the Sherline.

Marc No worries i will paint it! Pictures before hand though!

-Marty
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Scratchman
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« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2009, 10:36:12 AM »

Fantastic work Marty. You look like you're having way too much fun with That new toy.

Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2009, 11:02:43 AM »

This is getting better and better.  Beautiful work, Marty.
Thanks for keeping us updated.
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PuckHog
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« Reply #26 on: June 03, 2009, 08:45:21 AM »

This is most impressive, Marty......Since you don't have a resistance set-up, could you explain your technique ?  ( I'm trying to learn this sodderring stuff!)

                                                                         Thanks for posting this work......Randy                   
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lab-dad
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« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2009, 09:24:06 AM »

Randy
I have been using a torch to solder most of this stuff.
Some parts are thin enough I "tin" them with a soldering iron.
Then I have to devise a way to clamp all the old parts in place and the one to be added.
Heat it up, add solder then wait till it cools (hard to do) but you learn when you move it early and it falls apart! Lips sealed Angry Huh
very clean joints and a tiny bit of flux help too (with any soldering)
-Marty
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lab-dad
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« Reply #28 on: June 03, 2009, 09:25:53 AM »

Thought you guys might enjoy seeing what is involved in “making a part”
Again, remember I am no expert nor do I have any formal training what-so-ever.
So, I needed a large pillow block for the Corliss.
The top is .250” thick, 1.000” long and .0505 wide (I will file the .005” off to match the bottom after machining)
The bottom is .500” square and 2.00” long

1)   Clamp top & bottom together with the correct offset and drill the holes for the 2-56 hardware; (4).070” @.300” on center, .100” from each edge.
2)   Remove top, drill .089” for screws and countersink so screw heads are flat.
3)   Tap bottom holes 2-56
4)   Reassemble top & bottom, step drill on center for crankshaft .316” (5/16 + .004 for clearance)
5)   Mark bottom for radius and flat, remove bulk of material with band saw
6)   Mill radius and flat mounting surface on bottom part
7)   Drill holes for the 2-56 mounting hardware in the bottom piece; (4).089”@ .300” on center, .100” from each edge.
Cool   Remove top and mill ends .200” wide .0125” deep
9)   Make jig to radius top of pillow block
a.   Cut ½” plexiglass 1” x 3” for sacrificial base, center drill for center mounting.
b.   Tap  top - 5/16 – 18 .250” deep
c.   Tap  bottom – 3/8 – 16 .250” deep
d.   Drill additional  mounting hole for bolt & T-nut
e.   Mount in rotary table using 3/8 set screw in center, square, drill two holes for drill rod to prevent pillow block from turning.
10)   Mount pillow block in fixture radius top of pillow block

I want to make the oil cup and then I’ll show pictures of the finished part.
-Marty

« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 05:01:36 PM by lab-dad » Logged

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jacq01
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« Reply #29 on: June 03, 2009, 09:33:19 AM »


  Marty, 
  beautiful..... 

  Jacq
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never underestimate the stupidity of idiots
I am what I remember.
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