Westlake Publishing Forums
July 05, 2020, 11:10:12 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: 1:13.7 Plymouth TLC loco  (Read 13399 times)
billmart
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143


« on: August 11, 2012, 10:06:37 AM »

I have been scratch building a Plymouth TLC for several years.  (It's just one of many long-term projects I have on the shelf.)  I'm finally to the painting phase.  My plan is to have a light gray frame with dark green body.  I want the loco to look as though it has been used, but well cared for -- dusty and dirty, with some ares of wear, but not a rusty hulk.  I hereby solicit your advice for how to proceed with weathering the frame.  Please be aware that I have little in the way of artistic talent, and I don't want this one project to take 50 hours to paint and weather.  It's destined for use on my outdoor railway.

Looking forward to your suggestions.

Bill Martinsen


* Frame - painted-2.jpg (46.34 KB, 800x249 - viewed 1472 times.)

* Frame - painted-4.jpg (51.84 KB, 800x534 - viewed 1420 times.)
Logged
darrylhuffman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 165


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2012, 01:38:04 PM »

Wow!!

Looks great to me.

Looking forward to the finished loco.

I can't think of why it would take 50 hours to paint and weather.

Weathering is my favorite part of anything to do with locomotives.

Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@yahoo.com
Logged

Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@yahoo.com
The search for someone else to blame is always succcessful.
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2012, 03:01:41 PM »

That thing is dead sexy!!!!!!!
I love 4 wheel Plymouths.
Would love to see more of the in progress.
There are so many ways to go with the weathering.
Maybe just some chips with vallejo german camo brown.
And some fading with artists oils.
Followed with some powders, oil & rst stains. .....
Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
billmart
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143


« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2012, 04:10:50 PM »

Darryl and Martin -  Thanks for the kind words.  I haven't taken many in progress photos, but this one will show you what the TLC looks like.

Martin - I've never tried to add chipping effects with a paint brush.  Perhaps it's time I learned how to do that.  Any suggestions on placement of said paint spots?

Darryl - Will you be attending the NNGC in the Seattle area in about a month?

Bill M.


* General arrangement-LR.jpg (100.14 KB, 800x682 - viewed 1408 times.)
Logged
Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2506



WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2012, 07:43:05 AM »

That is georgeous! Beautiful construction.
Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
billmart
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143


« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2012, 03:54:38 PM »

Thanks, Chuck.  Coming from you, that means a lot to me.

In general, I do OK with making and assembling parts to produce a nice model, but I have a lot to learn when it comes to weathering. 

Bill Martinsen
Logged
Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2506



WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2012, 10:33:12 AM »

I am jealous of being able to use real nuts and bolts for a model. They look just right.

I wouldn’t know where to start painting a big project like this. I seem to recall one of the Annuals had an article on two similar prototype locos. They were painted yellow and were not heavily weathered. Might be a good reference point.
Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2012, 11:30:46 AM »

Quote
Martin - I've never tried to add chipping effects with a paint brush.  Perhaps it's time I learned how to do that.  Any suggestions on placement of said paint spots?

First off look at real locos and see where the chips happen.
Likely are places with constant or normal contact.
Scratches can also be done with he Vallejo.
I was also thinking there should be some shiny wear spots where the operator would grab on and step.
These can be done with a graphite pencil to give the dark steel color.
I have recently discovered the MIG weathering pigment dark steel and really like it.

At least by using acrylic if you dont like it you can remove it!

-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Barney
Guest
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2012, 01:15:56 PM »

This is perfection of the highest - after seeing this little plymouth chassis my 1/16 scale Narrow gauge chassis hit the bin big time - thinking of tacking up stamp collecting
lovely workmanship -just keep it coming .
Barney
busy collecting new nuts / bolts and rivets and a new sheet of plastic card for a restart !
Logged
billmart
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 143


« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2012, 02:26:30 PM »

Thanks for the suggestions, gentlemen.  I've decided not to begin the weathering process until I have the second issue of The Weathering Magazine in my hands.  It's going to cover Dust, Dirt, and Earth.  I really enjoyed the first issue on Rust.

In the meantime, I'm going to try some small weathering experiments.  I've got to start somewhere!

Bill Martinsen
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!