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Author Topic: HMS Victory 1:98  (Read 578 times)
WP Rayner
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« on: October 06, 2021, 09:18:44 AM »

And now for something completely different, building the Mantua Model 1:98 HMS Victory plank-on-frame model. I purchased this kit in 1979 and have been hauling it back and forth around the U.S. and Canada ever since. Mrs. R, cherry-cheeked daughter of Queen Boadicea and a Navajo warrior, has mandated that it is now time to build this model. This kit is still produced, though now all the pieces are laser cut. In this original version, you have to cut all the pieces yourself, lots and lots and lots of scroll saw and jewellers saw work.

The first step was to construct a build board to provide a stable base and reference platform while assembling the model, particularly important when building up the hull. I built mine from 3/4" Birch ply and Maple based on a design in the book pictured, The Anatomy of Nelson's Ships by C. Nepean Longridge, without a doubt the best reference book on building a model of the Victory. Construction is straight forward, the plywood base has two Maple stringers on the underside for added stability and ease in picking up and moving the board. The grooved Maple strip along the centre-line supports the keel (and ultimately the entire model) during construction. The travelling frame, useful for taking and checking measurements during hull construction, can be positioned at precise points along the hull and is made from Maple and held in position with press-fit brass pegs. The porcelain knobs were salvaged from an old china hutch. The challenge in the construction of the build board was accuracy in layout and construction: the frame has to be square to the centre-line at all positions along the board.

The L-shaped piece in the foreground is the start of the keel and a modification I'm making to the model. The kit keel is plywood and I've modified it to accept the walnut version which will look much better on a finished model. It's made of several pieces, joined by miniature scarf joints and tree-nails. Currently working on the bow pieces, Gripe and Knee of Head, which are also Walnut.

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Paul

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Lawrence@NZFinescale
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2021, 01:23:50 PM »

I grew up a few miles from Portsmouth (England) and Victory has always been in the background of my life.

But I'm no expert.  If you haven't seen HMS Victory - Her construction, career and restoration (Alan McGowan, 1999), it is worth a look. 200 pages with very good drawings and photos.
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2021, 02:20:09 PM »

If you haven't seen HMS Victory - Her construction, career and restoration (Alan McGowan, 1999), it is worth a look. 200 pages with very good drawings and photos.

Thanks for the reference Lawrence, I'll see if I can track it down. I last saw the Victory in 1980 on a trip to the UK, drove down from London in a Triumph as I recall. Dr. Longridge's book was first published in 1955 and there are later editions, mine is from 1974. The book chronicles in exhaustive detail the construction of the original ship as well as Dr. Longridge's model which was in the Science Museum in London. I don't know if the model is still on display or not.
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Paul

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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2021, 02:39:30 PM »

I have that book. At one time I was foolish enough to think I might build plank on frame sailing ships but quickly realized my error. -- Russ
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2021, 06:08:07 PM »

An impressive build table.
Walnut instead of plywood sounds good for the keel, but will the bottom be copper clad?
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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2021, 03:53:15 AM »

I have not yet built a ship model on spanners.  But arched car roofs, which went very well.  The slipway looks very professional.
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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2021, 02:31:50 PM »

I have that book. At one time I was foolish enough to think I might build plank on frame sailing ships but quickly realized my error. -- Russ

That might have been briefly in my mind too.
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« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2021, 02:34:33 PM »

Quote
Thanks for the reference Lawrence, I'll see if I can track it down. I last saw the Victory in 1980 on a trip to the UK, drove down from London in a Triumph as I recall. Dr. Longridge's book was first published in 1955 and there are later editions, mine is from 1974. The book chronicles in exhaustive detail the construction of the original ship as well as Dr. Longridge's model which was in the Science Museum in London. I don't know if the model is still on display or not.

It's easy to find secondhand on line.  Abe books or amazon.
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« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2021, 03:24:17 PM »

Thanks Bill and Helmut, much appreciated.

An impressive build table.
Walnut instead of plywood sounds good for the keel, but will the bottom be copper clad?

I'm undecided at this point about the copper cladding. I'm taking some artistic license with the model, example the Walnut keel and I plan to use Walnut to highlight some other construction details on the model, so it won't be an historically accurate model. Visually, I've never really liked copper cladding on a model, but fortunately it's not a decision I have to make for some time. Additionally it will depend on the availability of the correct thickness copper foil. With the exception of plywood and Maple, basic woodscrews and bolts, everything I use in the workshop has to be mail-ordered in. We live in an absolute desert here as far as model-making supplies are concerned.
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Paul

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« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2021, 03:36:57 PM »

Quote
Thanks for the reference Lawrence, I'll see if I can track it down. I last saw the Victory in 1980 on a trip to the UK, drove down from London in a Triumph as I recall. Dr. Longridge's book was first published in 1955 and there are later editions, mine is from 1974. The book chronicles in exhaustive detail the construction of the original ship as well as Dr. Longridge's model which was in the Science Museum in London. I don't know if the model is still on display or not.

It's easy to find secondhand on line.  Abe books or amazon.

I did find it on Amazon, though it's not currently available and priced at $250.00 new, it's out of the question. Used copies work out to around $65 each, whether Amazon or Abe, factoring in shipping and currency exchange. Even that is a little steep for our pocketbook as we live solely on our pensions. Thankfully, I've had Dr. Longridge's book for as long as I've had the model in addition to a lot of other classic ship-building publications and reference photos from various museum sources, so I should be good given that I'm not building an exact historically accurate model, but exercising some artistic license in the use of specific woods. Nevertheless I appreciate your interest and the reference suggestion.
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Paul

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« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2021, 03:08:06 AM »

Hello Paul

I know, this is still far away. Nevertheless some very interesting reading concerning the colours of this ship:


https://www.nmrn.org.uk/news-events/nmrn-blog/hms-victory-be-re-painted-battle-trafalgar-colours-after-210-years

https://www.nmrn.org.uk/news-events/nmrn-blog/hms-victory-her-true-colours
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"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2021, 11:27:58 AM »

A very interesting subject - So what sort of size will this little treasure be -
Barney
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2021, 12:03:21 PM »

Thank you for the links Peter, very informative and a useful reference. As you say, that process is a long way off at this point and I'm not entirely sure I'm going to paint the model as I've always preferred a varnished wood appearance on ship models.

Barney, when fully rigged, the overall size is approx. 40" long by 30" high, a fair size. One thing for sure, it will need a whacking great display case.
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Paul

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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2021, 10:56:22 PM »

Wow, that's going to be huge!

When we used to go to the county fair, one of my favorite things was the woodworking exhibit, which always had some fantastic model ships as well as life-like bird carvings and other neat stuff.
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« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2021, 08:47:28 AM »

Currently there is a restoration project going on to the full sized ship.  When they removed the masts as part of the project, they discovered a coin from when the mats were first stepped under one of the masts.  Probably the main mast.  Do not forget to include this detail once you get to the stage where you step the masts.

Start of project looks great and I believe will be instructive to those of us who consider a boat to be "A hole in the water into which a rich man pours money".
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