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Author Topic: Watery Grave  (Read 157704 times)
Frederic Testard
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« Reply #90 on: November 09, 2010, 02:21:56 PM »

Yes, Dallas, S scale is an easy one to manage computationnally speaking.
Thanks for posting the drawing, Marc. I'm not so far from the moment when I'll have to build such a buoy for my current Dave's Corner project, a shameless copy of Dave Revelia's marine boatworks diorama, and the dimensionnal hints will help me to do this part of the work.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #91 on: November 09, 2010, 03:31:11 PM »

I'm not saying the scale is difficult to compute....it's just not a visual scale I can associate with in any way.  I have spent my working days for the last 35 years dealing with and visualizing in 1/1, 1/48, 1/35, 1/32, 1/24, 1/12, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20, 1/100 and so on......but NEVER in that whole time have I EVER had to do anything in 3/16...so what I am saying is that this is a scale that regardless of knowing how it works mathematically, is a visually incomprehensible scale for me.....in other scales, I can generally look at an item and estimate and eye-ball the scale size, or at least recognize the proportional relevance/association/feel of a detail, part, moulding etc. to real life.....but not in this scale.  I can't see it at all....I have to physically measure the part/detail, then visualize it/or the visual proportion, in either full scale, or in a scale I am familiar with. Plus because I am so unused to working in this scale, I have an automatic mental tendancy, while building, to unknowingly drift towards a scale I am visually familiar with...like the 1/48....especially so since I have it's pretty much ingrained in me what real world dimensions the different sizes of plastic sheet and strip are in 1/48 and 1/35.

Not complaining here.....it's all part of model building....just saying it's an idiotic scale. Grin


Marc
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« Reply #92 on: November 09, 2010, 03:43:47 PM »

Frederic,

The buoy and dimensions I have shown are just arbitrary inventions from my head. The buoy itself is a combination/amalgamation of ideas and details that I recall from looking at real world examples....compined with what I think would work well in the scene....so it is only an "inspired by" type of model...not a prototypically correct one....I would probably get hammered by naval architects/engineers.

....the same goes for the proportion...I just happened to like the ones in the sketch...which if the drawing is assumed at 1/48 scale.....happened to scale out at those dimensions.


Marc
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« Reply #93 on: November 09, 2010, 03:49:52 PM »

Glad this project is back on the desk, if your next version is too big you can always turn it into this

http://www.postlerferguson.com/work/buoy-lamps


Those are quite cool....interesting site as well, with some creative work and approach...though the paper automatics are kind of strange...well done and designed...but a strange subject. It does lead me to inquire though...is the company related to you?


M
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #94 on: November 09, 2010, 06:21:40 PM »

Marc, thanks for the comment. You know, I have never seen such an object except in pictures, and I am sure I couldn't guess its dimensions better than you.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #95 on: November 11, 2010, 03:21:19 PM »

So as not to let the incorrect 1/48 sized base go to waste, I built up a very quick and rough mock-up of the complete buoy, so that I could check to see of I liked the design and proportions. This piece will also be good later on to experiment with the painting and weathering.







The second try on the base with the correct diameter. A PVC  1/2" pipe coupling was used for the cylinder, and .010" styrene strip was used for the banding. The 110  .018 dia. rivets were punched from .005 styrene, using a Waldron punch and die set.





Marc
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #96 on: November 11, 2010, 03:29:25 PM »

I must say I find your quick mock-up a fairly nice looking part, Marc.
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Frederic Testard
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« Reply #97 on: November 11, 2010, 03:41:10 PM »

I was just about to say the same thing. I wish my final results would look as beautiful as your "mock-up".
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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #98 on: November 11, 2010, 04:06:33 PM »

Oh buoy!
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« Reply #99 on: November 11, 2010, 06:34:29 PM »

I was just about to say the same thing. I wish my final results would look as beautiful as your "mock-up".

Indeed, I also.
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« Reply #100 on: November 11, 2010, 10:06:54 PM »

That is one heck of a nice mockup!
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« Reply #101 on: November 12, 2010, 02:54:21 AM »

Obviously this is only a "mock-up" as Marc has used the incorrect sized rivets and there are not enough of them . I know because I counted them !
   I hope you don't throw this trial away when you have finished (?) it because it is to good to trash ,

  Nick
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« Reply #102 on: November 12, 2010, 07:18:28 AM »

What/how are the angle pieces that secure the superstructure to the base made from?

Excellent mock-up too!

-Mj
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« Reply #103 on: November 21, 2010, 11:36:39 PM »

Marty,

The angle pieces are fabricated from two pieces of .010 strip styrene.


Was rainy and cold here, but decided to have some fun playing around with painting on the test buoy.

Base colors were done with  Tamiya colors, mixed to a couple shades of rust. This was followed by a coat of  Model-Master "Lusterless Flat" clear coat.




After  3 coats of hairspray., the color coats were applied.  Color coat consisted of  a  mixture of Game Color  "Dwarf Skin" (#72041), "Hot Orange" (#72009), and Panzer  Aces  "Stencil" (#313).  A leftover Eduard  1/35 scale number mask  (though abit oversized for this) was used to mask the '3', and Tamiya masking tape was used to mask the line; which were sprayed with the  "Stencil" color .




Chipping done with brushes, toothpicks, and a T-pin.




The first weathering stage. Fading done using Windsor Newton artist oil color "Titanium White", followed by the initial rust wash  and some streaking, using Abteilung-502  oil color "Dark Rust" (#070).






Marc




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M-Works
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« Reply #104 on: November 21, 2010, 11:52:03 PM »

Well, for a test, I'd say that looks pretty good... nicely done.

Paul
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