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Author Topic: Designing a shadowbox diorama  (Read 66599 times)
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #225 on: November 14, 2021, 08:22:20 PM »

Ray, one thing you could do is to hire a laser cutting guy. If you can draw the part in an illustration or photo editing program, many lasers can cut from a JPEG. -- Russ

Can a laser cutter do sheet brass?
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Ray Dunakin’s World
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« Reply #226 on: November 15, 2021, 12:12:33 AM »

Ray, for every processing of plate material there are optimal and less optimal methods. It always depends on what you want to achieve in the end result.
1. In etching technique, you can also educate structures in the surface by processing 2 pages.
2. Laser very dependent on the power, how thick the material may be. Mainly contours are possible and only minimal structures of the surface, such as .B. wall joints. The disadvantage of metal is a small degree caused by burning.
3. Waterjet cutting here much larger material thicknesses are also possible in metal. However, this is limited to contours. Disadvantage the cutting edge is rough and has to be partially reworked.
4. CNC flatbed milling with it everything is actually possible and with fitting holes also the machining from both sides. Disadvantage minimal breaking of the burr that can occur during milling. Advantage Structures are possible on both sides.

For all this, a vector sign program such as e.B. CorelDRAW is optimal.
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Regards Helmut
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Bernhard
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« Reply #227 on: November 26, 2021, 12:27:00 PM »

Hauk
There are two ways to create more plasticity in etched parts:
- Build up from several layers.
- Symmetrical etching from both sides of the sheet. This requires separate etching films for front and back. Black surfaces are not etched. White areas on one side are removed up to half the thickness of the material. White areas on both sides are etched through.

Ray:
Brass is difficult to laser cut because reflections from the material can damage the laser optics. It is better to use nickel silver as an alternative.

Bernhard
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finescalerr
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« Reply #228 on: November 27, 2021, 12:26:57 AM »

What if you were to laser cut a stiff, strong paper like Strathmore Bristol Plate? The single "ply" thickness is 0.006" and it goes up to five ply (0.030"). Might that serve as an alternative to etched metal? If it's too flexible, you may brush on acrylic lacquer to make any paper about as stiff as styrene. -- Russ
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Hauk
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« Reply #229 on: November 27, 2021, 06:35:13 AM »

Hauk
There are two ways to create more plasticity in etched parts:
- Build up from several layers.
- Symmetrical etching from both sides of the sheet. This requires separate etching films for front and back. Black surfaces are not etched. White areas on one side are removed up to half the thickness of the material. White areas on both sides are etched through.

PPD Ltd. that does my etchings do indeed use two-sided etchings.
So I design all my etching artwork in two layers, one for the back and one for the front. This also allows for relief effects like raised rivets, folding lines etc.

Regarding multiple layers for building up mass I can clearly see that it has it uses, but for the windows I will settle for the 0,6 thick version of the windows.

When it comes for using lasercut paper/cardboard for the windows, I am for better or worse too attached to my "Philosophy" of using a modelling material that is as close to the prototype mateial as possible. So the perfect solution would be a metal casting, but a etched metal sheet is the next best thing. I can certainly see limitations to this approach, you just have to look at the marvelous styrene work others on this group do. 
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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

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« Reply #230 on: November 27, 2021, 07:38:16 PM »

Hauk,
I like your philosophy and tend to follow the same approach with my own work.
One option to consider would be adding an operable sash down low on each window.  These were important air "intakes" to encourage convective ventilation in the days before air conditioning.
It's a minor detail, but it would add some variation to the window framing and make them less static.  My two cents...


* Sash.jpg (148.54 KB, 1136x1004 - viewed 82 times.)
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Eric Zabilka
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« Reply #231 on: November 28, 2021, 12:57:35 AM »

Please pop in more often, Eric. -- Russ
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Sami
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« Reply #232 on: December 03, 2021, 02:14:55 PM »

Good effect Eric !
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