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Author Topic: Narrow gauge tramway loco  (Read 620 times)
Design-HSB
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« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2020, 04:15:37 PM »

With the Xrot R12 I solved the following dimensions:


There are 2 different bogion frames and this is the rear.
However, the front bogie is already ready.
Since the slingshot has a gigantic model weight, the boguas actually have no suspension but end stops. These end stops are adjustable via the counter nuts. From these end stops, the wheels can still spring out of the springs by means of small compression springs.


Here the counter bearing from the bogie with an axial ball bearing like the model.

On the side, as with the model, there are only sliding plates, so that rocking prevents the construction. If your tram has to enter and exit in control tracks, it is recommended to make a bogie around the longitudinal axis tiltable and the other bogie to the other bogie. The axles of the R12 are minimally spring-loaded, but you can also achieve this excellently by a rocker technique of the bogies. For this purpose, the bogie must be divided lengthways and additionally made movable in the middle at the pivot point.

Definitely a very interesting project.
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Regards Helmut
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Bernhard
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« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2020, 04:45:11 AM »

Peter, I would suggest to fix the bogie to the locomotive body with a screw. If you tighten it carefully, you can adjust the axial play very small. The pivot and bore should have as little play as possible.
I would not recommend a spring preload. The bogie cannot turn freely with it, which can lead to derailment in curves.

Bernhard


* Lagerung.jpg (73.88 KB, 567x487 - viewed 10 times.)
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Peter_T1958
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« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2020, 07:02:34 AM »

For this purpose, the bogie must be divided lengthways and additionally made movable in the middle at the pivot point.

Hmm, this could work, even in such a small scale compared to your „huge“ Xrot! Would that mean, the second (rear) bogie should be non-motorised?!?

Peter, I would suggest to fix the bogie to the locomotive body with a screw. If you tighten it carefully, you can adjust the axial play very small. The pivot and bore should have as little play as possible. I would not recommend a spring preload. The bogie cannot turn freely with it, which can lead to derailment in curves.
Bernhard


Thanks for your hint - I didn't realise that! At some threads in different forums I could make out coils springs around the screw. Here a quick sketch:



This corresponds approximately what you are proposing, yes (?)

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Hauk
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« Reply #18 on: November 22, 2020, 09:51:50 AM »

Regarding the attachment of the trucks (bogies) to the body; I used the "three legged stool" principle for my Westinghouse engines.  One bogie (A) is allowed to rotate freely in both planes. This is just like the drawing you postet right after I first posted this message!  The other (B) is allowed only to move in the horizontal plane.





I use that same principle for the wheelsets. One axle is fixed to the bogie (two "legs"), and the other is allowed to swivel sligtly (one "leg"). This works well for my bogies, since only the fixed axle is powered. A more elegant solution for making sure that all the wheels are in contact with the track would be to use sprung axleboxes. Unfortunately, mys skills are not yet up to that task.

When it comes to the wheels, have you compared the prototype wheel profile against your chosen Slater Wheels? I dont know If you you are planning a stand-alone model or have plans for more rolling stock and perhaps a layout. If the latter is the case, you should consider a complete set of standards. This would include wheel profile, back-to-back, exact track gauge, check gauge etc.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2020, 10:16:02 AM by Hauk » Logged

Regards, Hauk
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« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2020, 12:41:27 PM »

Sorry for the delay in my replay – although the number of cases still is stagnating in Switzerland, the daily work has become demanding too due to the legal guidelines, huh…   

Thanks for your inputs, Bernhard and Havard!
@ Harvard
It may well be that I am slow on the uptake, but I do not really understand what you mean with the first sketch. How exactly should I interpret that bearing points? Sorry!
Anyway, I have to point out, that the space between the upperside of the motor/gear unit is limited due to the motor located very (!) close to the centerin pin…
 


All the best,
Peter


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"Siplicity is the ultimate sophistication" -Leonardo Da Vinci-

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