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Author Topic: sandblasting with a little help  (Read 351 times)
fspg2
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« on: October 06, 2020, 07:30:08 AM »

If you want to sandblast many small parts, it is often very difficult to hold them in the sandblasting cabin with the rather thick rubber glove.
To sandblast all sides, the part has to be turned several times ... how often does it fall into the blasting material ...

It's easier with the help of a kitchen strainer! To turn the parts, the sieve is shaken briefly.

alles_im_Sieb_01 (fspg2)



If there is still something left over at the end, it will be picked up again - in any case, a time saving, with low costs for such a strainer.

Stay healthy!

Frithjof
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Frithjof
finescalerr
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2020, 12:56:15 PM »

Thank you for the helpful tip. -- Russ
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SandiaPaul
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2020, 06:23:14 PM »

That is a great idea...I've had this problem for a long time. Thanks!
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Paul
Chuck Doan
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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2020, 07:17:27 PM »

Great idea!
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fspg2
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2020, 09:56:48 AM »

Thanks for your praise Smiley

Small parts with holes can also be drawn on a thin wire.

alles_im_Sieb_02 (fspg2)


So that they are not too close together, I made small knots in the wire.

After blasting, they went into the browning.

alles_im_Sieb_03 (fspg2)

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Frithjof
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2020, 06:40:07 PM »

Very clever ideas!
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Bernhard
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2020, 01:56:23 PM »

Thanks for sharing your know-how.

Bernhard
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fspg2
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2020, 12:22:51 PM »

In another attempt with small screws, a thin brass wire also helped.

alles_im_Sieb_04 (fspg2)


Frithjof
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Frithjof
Lawton Maner
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« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2020, 11:13:16 AM »

The same technique can be used to hold on to small parts when one wants to plate them.  You just clip the lead to the wire and off you go.  With steel parts you can dip them into Phosphoric acid metal prep to blacken them with a rust resistant black finish.  Also works to make the hexagonal screwdriver tips rust resistant.
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