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Author Topic: Making Weld Seams  (Read 9741 times)
marc_reusser
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« on: January 15, 2007, 03:17:34 PM »

Here are some easy ideas to simulate weld seams in 1/48. These are weld seams betweed two abutting plates where the weld joins the plates or fills a gap. (Yes it's military...but the same techniques apply to RR  Wink )

While working on this model I needed to replicate some new weld seams based on prototype information supplied by a fellow modeler.



The fished seams on the model:



And a detailed view/explanation of how they were made:



1. The new perimeter .010 styrene strip that I inserted between the Turret top and sides was given a texture using a #11 Xacto blade with a broken tip, and slightly "pushing" the styrene surface to form ridges. These were then softened with liquid adhesive.

2. The kit weld seam between the top, and the armor reinforcing, is poorly represented, and was next to be reworked. 2 parallel grooves were but at either side of the cast on weld, using an Xacto and chisel. Then using a round tipped chisel small cuts were made at a 45 degree angle into the space between the two scribed grooves. This surface was then lightly rubbed down with my finger tip, and soften with liquid adhesive, taking care not to get any on the grove sides.

3. The weld detailing between the turret top, and mantlet front, are completely missing in the kit. This was added using the same technique as above.

4. The cast on weld seam (locator ridges) for the smoke dischargers also needed some attention. Once again using a chisel small 45 degree angle cuts were made. The image shows the welds prior to receiving a softening coat of liquid adhesive. The front portion of the cast on seam/ridge has been removed, as it is incorrectly spaced (to wide) for the Hauler PE part. A new seam will be located here made from stretched sprue.

More welds to come...... Grin

Marc





« Last Edit: January 16, 2007, 12:06:24 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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M-Works
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007, 08:43:03 PM »

This is supposed to be "new", but have you tried to weather anny of these (or similar) and if so are the welds still obvious?
Im thinking the oil washes would still leave the detail.?...

Looking forward to seeing the sprue welds
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2007, 10:12:10 PM »

Marty,

As you note, the oil washes will enhance the seams on the finished model...especially if "pin washes" are used, where the wash mainly follows the grooves and depressions. This can then also be further accentuated either by light dry brushing, or in the "panel shading" phase before the washes are applied. "Dust" and "rust" and "grime" will also settle nicely in and along  seams like these as they would in a prototype......note though that the weld bead itself should not be rusted....welding material has lead in it, and generally resists rusting. It will retain a metalic or silvery sheen long after the adjacent surfaces have developed a deep red/brown rust tone.

Marc
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« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2007, 08:20:38 AM »

"welding material has lead in it, and generally resists rusting"

Good point! something I know but forget when modeling.
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bigdrag
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2007, 08:49:22 PM »

Here is another good link on making weld seams...It is from an Armor site (gasp!)  Shocked

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=220

Kevin
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2007, 02:23:57 AM »

Kevin,

Thanks for posting that. Much easier than having to leaf through the AFV modeler where this was once published.

Marc
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M-Works
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