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Author Topic: Gerd is building a Shay  (Read 30681 times)
marc_reusser
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« Reply #60 on: August 12, 2009, 01:45:36 AM »

Still amazing!

The only question I have is why plywood for the front running boards on the left and right....it seems that they are not as integral to the structural ridgidity of the frame as say the plate under the cab and water bunker....so why not do the running boards out of Eiche or Birke? (or even a Teak or Mahogony for weather and rot resistance)...seems like you would have prettier wood grain, and wouldn't need to wory about the exposed lamiations showing at the outside edges?.......just curious.



Marc
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 01:47:08 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

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In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

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Waldbahner
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« Reply #61 on: August 12, 2009, 02:02:36 AM »

Hi Marc,

that's easy to answer ;-)

1. I don't have any of the wood types you've listed.
2. After several steam ups, most of this area will be covered with oil and soot dust (Like on my Forney). This will also cover most of the laminations.
3. Mixing different wood types will result in different basic colors. Hard to stain them all into the same color.
4. There are also some parts to be mounted on the running boards like the lubricator that needs a good stand too.

I made very bad expirence with thin wooden boards on my Forney. Exspecially in combination with water. Only hard wood could work for this.

At last, you're right. Fine wood may be better for a fine model. But at last, this loco is designed as a work horse for a long life. Maybe I'll glue a thin strip along the edge to hide the laminations.

Gerd
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Waldbahner
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« Reply #62 on: September 10, 2009, 01:52:36 AM »

Good morning,

I've some news on my Shay:

1. The wooden parts of the frame are stained to a dark brown that gives a very nobly look.
2. The water tank was planed in CAD and I ordered sheet brass, brass profiles and 750 copper rivets... The rivets arrived yesterday and I hope to get the brass tomorrow.
3. The boiler drawing has been completed and I'm in discussion with my boiler maker.

This weekend, I'll build the rear sand bunkers, so new pics will come on Monday.


* Boiler.jpg (36.56 KB, 867x523 - viewed 415 times.)

* Watertank.jpg (40.91 KB, 982x556 - viewed 421 times.)
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Waldbahner
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« Reply #63 on: September 14, 2009, 12:33:08 AM »

Good morning...

last weekend, I spend some 15 hours on making some progress on the water tank. Neraly the first halve of the tank has been completetd and 150 rivets are set... over 400 will followe during the next days.

The bottom and top are cut from 1mm th. brass sheet, while the sides are made from 0.6mm th. brass. Brass angles with 10x10x2mm hold the joints together and for the curved sections of the tank, I turned rings on the lathe and cut them into halves or quarters.

I use 2x6mm copper rivets, each set manually and riveted with hammer and chisel. Later, I'l solder all joints with soft solder to seal the whole tank.


Click on thumbs for large pictures.

More details are shown on my website at http://www.gerds-modellbahn.de/shay/Aufbauten/Wassertank/Tank_e.htm

Bye, Gerd
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finescalerr
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« Reply #64 on: September 14, 2009, 01:44:30 AM »

Outstanding. -- Russ
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Ken Hamilton
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« Reply #65 on: September 14, 2009, 04:27:15 AM »

Beautiful work, Gerd.  Your brass-working skill is fantastic.
Nice job so far.  This is fun to watch.
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RoughboyModelworks
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« Reply #66 on: September 14, 2009, 09:54:05 PM »

Wow.... that's beautiful work Gerd.

Paul
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marc_reusser
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« Reply #67 on: September 15, 2009, 12:37:17 AM »

Wonderful to see. How are you doing the rivet installation?


M
« Last Edit: September 15, 2009, 12:39:02 AM by marc_reusser » Logged

I am an unreliable witness to my own existence.

In the corners of my mind there is a circus....

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Waldbahner
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« Reply #68 on: September 15, 2009, 01:39:50 AM »

I'll make a video clip this eveneing ;-)
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