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Author Topic: Chicago-Pneumatic Model 500 Compressor  (Read 347 times)
Andreas Kuehnpast
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« on: February 27, 2018, 02:58:44 PM »

I am currently working on an H0 model of a large mobile compressor from the early 1940s, a Chicago-Pneumatic Model 500. This compressor was the largest compressor available from Chicago-Pneumatic at that time, weighing 7 tons. There is no model of this compressor available, not in any scale. So this model requires a lot of traditional, and some not so traditional, model building techniques.   Roll Eyes

Luckily I soon discovered that the Model 500 used a standard Caterpillar diesel motor D-13000. This motor was quite common and among other things it was used to power large Caterpillar bulldozers. It is included in the H0 kit for the Caterpillar RD-8 bulldozer offered by Rio Grande Models and it is also available separately as an electric generator.

http://www.riograndemodels.com/Images/LargeHO/3058.jpg

I have ordered the generator kit and some additional parts required. The parts arrived within a short time (Eric Bracher of Rio Grande Models is very flexible and fast!) and I am currently assembling the motor, making changes in details on the way to update the D-13000 from the late 1930s to the early 1940s.

Sadly up to now I have to rely on only two photos of the compressor (see attached). My search for additional photos, for dimensions or drawings of this compressor so far have not been successful. Even contacting the manufacturer Chicago-Pneumatic, that still exists today and has been very helpful with some general information, did not lead to any additional photos or data.   Sad

Does anyone on this forum have access to photos, dimensions or drawings of this compressor? The Chicago-Pneumatic Model 500 was reasonably common in the early 1940s and it was also purchased by the US Army in 1941 or 1942. The Army issued three very detailed manuals for this compressor, covering spare parts, maintenance and transportation respectively. I have been able to acquire a copy of the Army Manual covering spare parts (TM 5-5042), but this Manual does only list and describe the minor spare parts, all major parts are simply listed with their parts number. My search for the other two Manuals (5-5042-1 "Preparation for export" and 5-5042-2 "Preventive maintenance services") so far has not been successful. I have also not been able to find any photos showing this compressor in use by the Army.

Any support is highly appreciated!


Andreas Kuehnpast

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eTraxx
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2018, 03:50:19 PM »

https://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/SciRefGuides/technicalmanuals.html#obtain
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Ed Traxler

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Socrates: "I drank WHAT?"
Andreas Kuehnpast
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2018, 04:29:48 PM »

Ed, thanks for postings this interesting link. Sadly the list contains only one document on the Model 500 compressor: "5-5042 Portable Air Compressor Model 500- Class PO-8. War Dept. Nov. 1942. 1 v. (various pagings).  U408.3.A13 TM 5-5042 Nov. 1942". I fear that I have recently obtained a copy of just this manual, though in a later version. My manual only contains a listing of the spare parts, no drawings or general dimensions...

Besides, as I live in Germany it will be impossible for me to access this document via Interlibrary Loan.

I will though look through some of the pages linked. Maybe I can find a suitable document on one of these sites.  Tongue


Andreas
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2018, 07:52:14 AM »

Andreas,
You can never tell .. If I run across something I will be sure to send it to you.

You mention living in Germany. So sad. I spent three years in Germany and my few German words were to order food and beer! Smiley .. important to be sure but I am sure my 6th Great Grandfather who came to to America from Germany in 1738 would shake his head sadly at my lack of German. Cheesy
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Ed Traxler

Lugoff, Camden & Northern RR

Socrates: "I drank WHAT?"
Andreas Kuehnpast
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2018, 02:14:56 PM »

Ed,

this really is a small world! When I last visited the US in 2013 I spent some time at the Vermont Historical Society in Barre, VT. When I told one of the librarians, that I had grown up in Duesseldorf in Germany, she told me that her sister had lived in that very city for a few years and she had visited her several times. As it turned out, her sister had lived just around the corner from my long-time home...  Cheesy

Thanks for offering to keep looking for documents on the compressor I am modeling for me!  Cheesy

Andreas Kuehnpast
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