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Author Topic: Weathering Wood Redux  (Read 1430 times)
Greg Hile
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« on: February 26, 2018, 07:06:49 PM »

I have been reviewing several past threads here on weathering wood and rather than reviving one of the old ones, I thought I would start a new one. Because BIS SilverWood is so difficult to get, I started playing with possible alternatives. In the picture below, there are three components of the freight deck for my C & AV train depot.

For the deck in the background, I simply applied about a 90/10 wash of 91% isopropyl alcohol and India ink.

The middle deck has the wash plus an equal full-strength mixture of Tru-Color flat brushable Grimy Black, Brown Oxide, and Aluminum.

The deck in the foreground is the same as the middle deck but with the addition of some streaks of a fourth color, Light Gray. 

The decks were scribed but I haven't added any nail holes, knots, or other weathering. Still just experimenting, but any thoughts?


* Weathered Deck.jpg (198.68 KB, 1024x770 - viewed 113 times.)
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detail_stymied
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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2018, 08:05:56 PM »

I think the ultimate solution (!) lies in the amount used. for myself, I get by with a 4 ounce bottle of Rustall Weatherall about every two years. it's 8 bucks, easy to get and use, and I can't find anything wrong with its result on basswood or hobby thin plywood (birch?). I've used it on Simpson redwood ties.

if I needed museum quality, more frequent use, or exponential quantity, I might seek a different resolve. but it's so easy to shake it a bit, dip in a wash brush, slather it on, put the cap back on and set the bottle back on the paint shelf.
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s.e. charles
finescalerr
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2018, 11:18:23 PM »

Just a thought about wood in general: We modelers tend to use bass, a wood with minimal figuring and very little grain. It's soft so we can distress it and it takes stains and powdered colors well. Only one problem: It has no distinguishing characteristic; it's generic wood. It rarely looks like the weathered, unpainted wood we see on old structures.

I have seen gorgeous examples of distressed and weathered basswood but none looks like knotty pine, cedar, walnut, or spruce. Am I the only modeler in the world who notices or cares? Look at the example I've attached and tell me how many models you've seen that closely emulate that weathered wood.

And then we have the problem of yellowing, so that a stick of bass we stain with India ink and alcohol looks silver-gray for a couple of years, then yellows and that turns the overall color brown. Maybe staining the wood with paint would help but it depends on how much you dilute the paint.

I guess the question, then, is whether wood is always the best way to represent wood. It partly depends on the scale of the model, of course, but not entirely.

Have I ruined everybody's day?

Russ


* goldcord1.jpg (93.67 KB, 1000x667 - viewed 83 times.)
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detail_stymied
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2018, 03:33:41 AM »

....Have I ruined everybody's day?...

nope. that only will come when we have another "should I poke holes to represent nail heads in my $400 craftsman kit siding?" thread.
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s.e. charles
Bill Gill
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2018, 07:00:44 AM »

Check out the fabulous weathering  Ray Dunakin does  to make styrene look like the weathered wood in Russ's photo:
(There's a lot more than this someplace(s) on the forums, but I can't find them right now:)

 7  General Category / Painting & Weathering Techniques / Re: Peeling/worn paint on wood?
on: May 04, 2009, 07:31:44 PM
 Message by Ray Dunakin

Thanks guys!

I used Apple Barrel flat acrylic paints. After scribing the grain and other details into the styrene, I applied the paints in multiple layers of thin washes. First I did a couple layers of "Nutmeg Brown", which is a warm, medium shade of brown. Then I added some washes of "Apricot", a sort of orange color, then a little more "Nutmeg Brown". Then I added some "Espresso", a darker, redder brown. This was applied in streaks, adding more to some areas and none to other areas. Finally, some very thin black was added, again applying more in some areas as needed.

Here's a pic showing how it looked:


* wIMG_1179.jpg (18.42 KB, 221x432 - viewed 128 times.)
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Greg Hile
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2018, 09:08:12 AM »

Yes, I saw Rayís post and it is typical Dunakin brilliance. I am going to try it but I also wanted to try the silverwood alternative on wood.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2018, 03:03:44 PM »

I published Ray's article about distressing and painting styrene to emulate weathered wood in the final (2013) Modelers' Annual. I studied Ray's photos very carefully and his artistry is almost incredible. He actually replicated the appearance of many individual boards on the shack he used as the basis for his model. Maybe somebody else has done similar work but I can't recall seeing it.

Those of us with less talent, like me, could use photos. Photograph a wall; print the photo on dead flat art paper; cut out the individual boards; emboss the strips to add depth and grain; laminate them onto card, wood, or styrene; stain the white edges; and build up the model.

I imagine other techniques exist. If anyone knows of one or has used a less conventional method to produce excellent results, this might be a good thread to show alternatives to the the traditional India ink and alcohol wood stain.

Russ
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Greg Hile
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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2018, 03:24:54 PM »

Iím also wondering about the differences between a busy freight dock versus a wall. I would assume the condition of wood that is continually walked on would weather differently from the sides. Same with stairs ...
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2018, 07:29:28 AM »

There will also be quite a bit of difference in appearance depending on the kind of wood, its orientation toward the sun and wind and exposure/contact with rain, snow, saltwater, stuff moving across it and more as well as what if any treatment(s) it had applied over its lifetime.
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darrylhuffman
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« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2018, 07:42:13 PM »

Russ,

The example you used for great looking wood is from the Gold Cord Mine in Alaska.

Each side of the building looks great.

Oddly, some of those walls were painted silver to begin with and had trim work that was painted turquoise.

Darryl
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Darryl Huffman
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finescalerr
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« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2018, 09:42:50 PM »

I think you may have sent those photos to me, Darryl, or maybe referred me to a site that had them. -- Russ
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darrylhuffman
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« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2018, 10:20:01 PM »

Russ,

About 40 years ago my wife and I photographed and measured the Gold Cord Mine.

Dozens of photos.

An HO scale model is now on display in the Wasilla museum in Wasilla, Alaska.
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Darryl Huffman
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2018, 09:45:51 AM »

Looks like the weathered wood on Nick's house!!  Smiley

Jerry
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Barney
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« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2018, 03:06:10 PM »

So whats the answer to this wood staining - Im not a favourite of this alcohol and indian ink it appears to lay on top of the wood and not stain it - on the ends of timbers it just goes black and leaves a stain on the sides - what is it that gave the Floquil paints the answer - just a small touch on the end of a timber sent it down the grain with no problem - is there a product available with the same type of solvent - the "Weather all" product appears has disappeared from the UK market or does any one know of a suppler in the UK - and the Floquil suppler no longer does it
The painting of wood presents no problem - so I think its time to ditch the wood and use styrene !! I think its get a copy of Rays excellent article on wood colouring.
Barney
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shropshire lad
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« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2018, 12:50:32 AM »

So whats the answer to this wood staining - Im not a favourite of this alcohol and indian ink it appears to lay on top of the wood and not stain it - on the ends of timbers it just goes black and leaves a stain on the sides - what is it that gave the Floquil paints the answer - just a small touch on the end of a timber sent it down the grain with no problem - is there a product available with the same type of solvent - the "Weather all" product appears has disappeared from the UK market or does any one know of a suppler in the UK - and the Floquil suppler no longer does it
The painting of wood presents no problem - so I think its time to ditch the wood and use styrene !! I think its get a copy of Rays excellent article on wood colouring.
Barney
in a upside down world   


 Chuck doesn't use styrene .
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