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Author Topic: power generating & distribution  (Read 1165 times)
detail_stymied
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« on: February 04, 2018, 12:03:48 PM »

could someone please explain the flow of power in the last (bottom) picture in this link:  http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_jacq_damen.html

I have a rough idea, but will have a bazillion follow up questions regarding the details. thanks
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s.e. charles
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2018, 11:10:06 PM »

It's a belt drive, "line shaft" system. These were common before small electric motors became widespread.

The boilers at lower right produce steam, which is used by the steam engines to the left. These drive a large wheel. A belt transfers motion from the large wheel, to one or more shafts in the rafters of the mill. Smaller wheels are mounted at various locations on the shaft(s), with corresponding belts connecting each wheel on the shaft to a machine below.

Here's some more info about this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_shaft

« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 11:13:10 PM by Ray Dunakin » Logged

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detail_stymied
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2018, 03:37:17 AM »

helpful; thank you. my conundrum stems from the steam to turbine (Huh) transmission. internet is helping with current (read: nuclear!) steam generation, but that's way beyond the technology shown in the link.

as this would be modeled - project #101 on the list - I would want the cut-off date for the equipment to be pre WW II.
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s.e. charles
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2018, 10:24:36 AM »

Not sure exactly what your question is but maybe a look at this video will help you out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGuR3WN8PCs&feature=youtu.be

Even if it doesn't help you it is a great watch Smiley
Rick
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Lawton Maner
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2018, 11:07:36 AM »

     The videos explain the logging part of the task quite well.  The intro at the first shows steam engine to belt very well.

     There is no turbine in the model of the sawmill you referenced to in the first post.  That mill uses a steam engine to drive the generator.
 
     A turbine works much like a windmill.  The high pressure steam exits a nozzle and is aimed at the turbine blades.  The pressure of the steam hitting the blades turn the energy in the steam into rotary motion which spins the generator which makes the electricity.  The greater the load demand on the generator the harder the turbine needs to work to keep the turbine spinning needing more steam.  In modern generating stations, the steam is in a closed loop whereby the used steam is condensed back into water and then pumped back into the boiler.  Older operations such as the mill in the model might have used the water once and then exhausted it into the air from a stack. About 4 pictures up from the bottom there is a clear view of the generator which is driven from a small belt on one of the 3 steam engines powering the mill.

     I hope this helps.
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5thwheel
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2018, 05:42:28 PM »

Very nice model.  The way I see it:  The two boilers are fired on saw dust. They feed steam to three engines. The smaller single engine runs the generator.  Given the size of the power boxes I am guessing the generator powers all the lights and possibly motors for the conveyors. The two larger two cylinder engines supply power to the head rig and to all the other equipment in the mill via belt. It is not clear to me if the engines also power the machine shop. There is a picture of s smaller boiler fed engine with cord wood stacked by it.  I wonder if this powers the belts to the machine shop.
I looked again and the little boiler fed engine does power the machine shop.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 05:44:19 PM by 5thwheel » Logged

Bill Hudson
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detail_stymied
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2018, 07:04:11 PM »

thanks all; great video and "yes" - all this is helpful. I assumed a turbine had to be separate from the generator because, I don't know, water & electricity don't mix? I just thought they would be 2 separate pieces of equipment.

I need to study up some more. thanks again.
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s.e. charles
Lawton Maner
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2018, 08:45:37 AM »

     Please remember that the only stupid question is the one not asked.  The knowledge of this group spans nearly everything.  And, none of us are reluctant to assist others.  Please do not be the guy who sat in the back of class and kept quiet because he thought his questions would make the rest of the class laugh.  All of use were that guy at one time.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2018, 12:52:00 PM »

I'm still that guy; the rest of the class always laughs at me no matter what. -- Russ
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Greg Hile
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« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2018, 02:07:33 PM »

Me, too. I always thought I was a comedian, but my kids explained that they were laughing at me, not with me.

And just yesterday, I came across these immortal words from Mark Twain, "Never argue with a stupid person. They'll take you down to their level and then they win by experience." Fortunately, there are no stupid people around these parts ...
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detail_stymied
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« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2018, 04:34:25 AM »

this is a pretty concise set-up:  http://progress-is-fine.blogspot.com/2018/03/sperry-electrical-plant-electrical.html
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s.e. charles
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