Westlake Publishing Forums
April 20, 2019, 04:19:07 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Oil canning in sheet metal  (Read 1026 times)
Burl
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 90



WWW
« on: December 22, 2017, 10:41:57 AM »

Having been trying my old tricks of Aluminum tape, I have not yet been able to get a result where I felt like I nailed the effect I was wanting.  So, I have spent a couple days seeing if I could find another way.  Finally got a spark in the proverbial light bulb: texture mapping.

I found a photo from a similar car (which I canít post here, due to copyright), and Photoshopped it into this:



From there, some black magic takes place to create a mesh in Fusion 360.  This goes through some smoothing & polygon reduction.  When Iím happy with it, I finish off the object by making it a solid, with a flat back.  Now, I have something I can upload to Shapeways:



With some basic manipulation, Iím hoping I can print 3-4 copies of it, all slightly different.  This should give me enough variety to do a whole car side, with no obvious repetition.

Logged

Burl
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 90



WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2017, 12:19:40 PM »

Forgot to mention, this also solves a couple other problems Iíve been working on for a long time:

1) I can see whether the edges will be even between panels beforehand now.  This means less (maybe zero) filling and sanding, which makes the weld bead decals easier to apply.

2) The valley can descend into the negative z-axis (relative to the weld bead).  Before, I had to exaggerate the peaks to make the vallies appear.
Logged

Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3908



WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2017, 01:05:04 AM »

Cool!
Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Lawton Maner
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 492


« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2017, 09:00:47 AM »

Does this mean you can model the damage to the roof caused by an over eager forklift driver?
Logged
Burl
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 90



WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2017, 09:27:46 AM »

Lawton: possibly.  The key is starting with a well lit image, since the software only interpolates the z-coordinate based on relative light/dark.  For instance, I had to find a photo with no reporting marks to do the example above.
Logged

Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!