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Author Topic: Steam Power: Building the Panama Canal  (Read 1423 times)
Ed Morris
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« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2017, 07:06:28 AM »

Five thousand workers died during the U.S. phase of canal construction.  The lack of visible safety or protective gear in the photographs would suggest that many more thousands probably suffered work related injuries.

The photos below document one of the more serious problems encountered during construction--earth slides:





Hopefully the shovel operators got out before the shovel was buried.
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Allan G
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« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2017, 02:00:56 PM »

For anyone who wants "a lot" more info on the building of the canal (both the French and American efforts) there's a great book by David McCullough:
"The Path Between the Seas"......Allan
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Ed Morris
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« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2017, 02:56:11 PM »

Thanks for the tip on the book.  I downloaded the Kindle version.  I've read a couple of his other books and like his style.  I see that he lists Avery, the author of the book I got the photographs from, as one of his sources.
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Ed Morris
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« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2017, 09:00:40 AM »

What do you do with 200 million cubic yards of dirt?  Apparently, you haul it off somewhere with a hundred work trains each day.









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finescalerr
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« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2017, 12:16:57 PM »

The Paraiso facilities might make a good diorama/layout. -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2017, 05:46:52 PM »

It's interesting the way they used flat cars, and unloaded them with a plow pulled by cable.

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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
Ed Morris
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« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2017, 08:22:11 AM »

Wrapping up, the next sequence of images purport to show the last train out, last rock removed, and so on.









Next week I will post the final images from the book.
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Ed Morris
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« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2017, 08:13:19 AM »

Final images.  I hope this has been enjoyable and inspirational.  I'm thinking of modeling the entire canal under construction circa 1910. Roll Eyes.  Maybe in Z scale!  First I've got to find 119 French tank locos in Z scale...











« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 08:15:19 AM by Ed Morris » Logged
finescalerr
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« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2017, 12:18:30 PM »

Well, that was interesting, educational, and fun. What's next? -- Russ
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2017, 07:29:58 PM »

Thanks so much for posting these! Great stuff, all very interesting!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

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