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Author Topic: Fordson tugger hoist  (Read 68615 times)
shropshire lad
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« Reply #405 on: May 30, 2019, 01:00:57 AM »

That's the best you could do? -- ssuR

 That’s right , Chuck . If you don’t raise your game a notch or two Russ is going to be forced to show you how it should be done !
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WP Rayner
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« Reply #406 on: May 30, 2019, 11:54:09 AM »

 Shocked Shocked Shocked  Unbelievable work as usual... you're giving me increased feelings of inadequacy  Wink
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 07:32:38 AM by WP Rayner » Logged

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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #407 on: June 13, 2019, 09:47:26 PM »

Thanks! Yes Russ it's all I can do. For now.


I installed the ignition magneto. This is an aftermarket style that replaced the troublesome Model T trembler coils that came from the factory. I didn’t want to repeat all the same details I did on the last Fordson.



Designed in Solidworks and printed by Shapeways in their smoothest detail plastic. I cored the parts for a .030 brass wire to strengthen the fragile material.



There are grease cups to keep this well lubricated. Sadly, the front side will mostly be hidden when the radiator is installed.



The screws on the magneto caps were made from Tichy model RR rivets with the screwdriver slot cut in with an Xacto.




« Last Edit: June 13, 2019, 09:50:15 PM by Chuck Doan » Logged

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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #408 on: June 13, 2019, 10:39:22 PM »

Just amazing!

Glad you didn't bore us with a repeat of the one you did on the Fordson!!

Jerry
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« Reply #409 on: June 14, 2019, 12:11:50 AM »

Excellent!
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finescalerr
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« Reply #410 on: June 14, 2019, 01:02:09 AM »

Not bad. Did you find the hi-res plastic from Shapeways far superior to what you've generally used? -- Russ
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #411 on: June 14, 2019, 04:57:07 AM »

Looks good. Is that the surface as it comes from Shapeways without any smoothing?
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #412 on: June 14, 2019, 10:51:41 AM »

Thanks very much! Russ, this is just the FXD material with a different name. They have dropped the FUD/FXD names for some reason.

Bill, unfortunately no. The parts require sanding/ scraping to get rid of the print lines. I consider it a form of "sweat equity".
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“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





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finescalerr
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« Reply #413 on: June 14, 2019, 12:53:36 PM »

We need to find a guy with a FormLabs printer or the equivalent. The output from my friend's printer I saw had no print lines and the resolution of injection molded parts. -- Russ
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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #414 on: June 16, 2019, 06:22:48 AM »

Fabulous , as to be expected 😉

Could you share how you achieved the 2 different paint finishes ...... completely captures the look of old aluminium castings
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Gordon
Chuck Doan
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« Reply #415 on: June 16, 2019, 09:25:35 PM »

Thanks Gordon!

The steps:
Primed with Mr. Surfacer black spray.
Applied thin ap of Rub N Buff Silver Leaf, and when dry, I, um, buffed it.
Then coated with Dullcote and soda blasted at low pressure (with my mini sandblaster and baking soda) to start to reveal the black, but just. Had a coupla do-overs here.
Then lightly cosmetic sponged Prismacolor pencil paint White and sealed again with Dullcote.

The (I assume Bakelite) distributor cap was painted with a grey/black mixed Prismacolor paint and then dusted with Bragdon pigments.

The grease is brown and black oil paint with fine dirt mixed in. The natural sheen of the oils can be left as is, or dulled with a touch of Prisma paint or brought up more with drybrushed high gloss.

Prismacolor paint is a wet pencil rubbed on a square of fine sandpaper. You can use it immediately as paint (brushed on) or let it dry and then pick up with a damp cosmetic sponge for subtle applications. I usually tear off a small bit of sponge and hold it with tweezers. EDIT: I use the Premier version of the pencils for this.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2019, 10:57:22 AM by Chuck Doan » Logged

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Dave Fischer
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« Reply #416 on: June 16, 2019, 11:58:33 PM »

Chuck-- I am SO glad you are willing to lay out a step-by-step on these techniques The Prisma paint is a great idea-- is that a standard Prismacolor pencil (the somewhat waxy, thick-leaded one) or the Prisma watercolor pencil? I remember back in the good old days of illustration using rubber cement thinner on a soft brush to soften and blend Prismacolor pencils over a painted background... works quite well and easily controlled, but rubber cement thinner is getting awfully hard to find (and WAY more expensive). I'm also wondering if anyone else can SMELL the dirt and oil on that engine?   DF
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #417 on: June 17, 2019, 10:56:05 AM »

Good point Dave. I have tried both types of the Prismacolor pencils, but I find the Premier pencils work better for me than the Watercolor (the Premier pencils are also water soluble for those who haven't used them). I hadn't heard of the rubber cement thinner method, could be a bit too potent for my workbench area! FYI, Bestine is back on the market after a couple of years of being out of production. I use it to clean the Shapeways FUD parts.

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“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





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Gordon Ferguson
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« Reply #418 on: June 17, 2019, 02:30:17 PM »

Thanks Chuck for taking the time to explain how you did the paint effects .......

Really must dig out my mini sand blaster and the baking soda , think it must be in the same cupboard as the grass master 😉😂😂😂
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Gordon
Carlo
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« Reply #419 on: June 18, 2019, 06:58:40 AM »

Great SBS, Chuck!
Gordon, what's a mini-sand-blaster (for use with baking soda)?
Carlo
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