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Author Topic: Fordson tugger hoist  (Read 35276 times)
Hauk
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« Reply #360 on: November 06, 2018, 05:16:04 AM »

I have used Sketchup quite a lot, both at work and as a hobbyist.

But for creating .stl masters for 3D-printing, I have switched to Autodesk Fusion360.

This is a program with features comparable to SolidWorks. But it is free for hobbyists and small businesses. You can earn up to $ 100.000 a year without paying for the software.

The learning curve is a bit steeper than SketchUp, but there are tons of tutorials and videos available online.

I really urge people to look into Fusion360 if they are serious about making masters for 3D printing.
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Regards, Hauk
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”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
finescalerr
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« Reply #361 on: November 06, 2018, 02:50:48 PM »

I can't find a free version, only a free 30 day trial version with "conditions". I never trust conditional offers, and we can't read the conditions beforehand, so I didn't download the software. Maybe you could help us with that. My experience with AutoDesk products has been positive; Fusion 360 may well be excellent. -- Russ
« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 03:05:26 PM by finescalerr » Logged
Greg Hile
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« Reply #362 on: November 07, 2018, 01:11:52 AM »

I have both SketchUp (I sprung for the Pro version this year) and Fusion 360. There are two free versions of SU, a web version called SketchUp Free, and the old SketchUp Make 2017, a downloadable program that isn't being upgraded but is still quite usable and, to many users, preferable over the web version. To get the Make version, go to https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-make. There are some features of the pro version that do not come with Make but overall they are very powerful programs.

Fusion 360 works the same way SU used to. You download a trial version and after the 30-day trial is over you can convert to the free account that Hauk referred to. I have had the account for a year or two and have never had any problems. Like SU, the free version lacks a feature or two but the customer support is the same.

I use both products, although I use SU a lot more than Fusion. I do architectural type design in SU and product or object design in Fusion.
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Hauk
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« Reply #363 on: November 07, 2018, 05:27:15 AM »

Here are a couple links to some more info on the subject:

https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/fusion-360/learn-explore/caas/sfdcarticles/sfdcarticles/How-to-activate-start-up-or-educational-licensing-for-Fusion-360.html

https://www.autodesk.com/campaigns/fusion-360-for-hobbyists

I am very happy with Fusion360, but I must admit that I am a little worried that Autodesk might change their licensing policy in the future. I would hate to invest a lot of time learning Fusion360, and then be forced to pay for using it.

Building a user base by giving the product away or selling it cheap and then jacking up the prices to cash in is an all to familiar business strategy. Photobucket is just one example that comes to mind.
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Regards, Hauk
--
”Yet for better or for worse we do love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them”  -Junichiro Tanizaki

Remembrance Of Trains Past
finescalerr
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« Reply #364 on: November 07, 2018, 02:35:15 PM »

Thank you both for those posts. After looking over the first link, Havard's point about AutoDesk's possibly giving away its program for a while and then maybe hitting us with an annual fee after we're "hooked", is exactly what worried me in the first place. When Adobe went to a subscription-only policy, I refused to do business with them. I kept the Adobe programs I own and, if I need a new feature, other companies' products are available.

As for SketchUp, I spoke to a subscriber a couple of years ago who uses 3-D CAD daily for work he does for Hollywood movies. I think he uses SolidWorks now but it's worth reporting what he told me because it reinforces what Greg and Havard say:

He thinks SketchUp is an excellent program and even devoted a lot of time to learning it in classes and working with it professionally. From a professional standpoint, it may become a little clumsy if you need some plug-ins to make it do what SolidWorks or Fusion360 do natively. SolidWorks also handles certain kinds of shapes more conveniently. An example might be Chuck's Fordson manifold.

SketchUp's inconveniences may be more important to professionals working against the clock than to hobbyists.

The bigger issue for most of us might be the threat of corporate blackmail: Do you want to use a subscription-only program, even if currently free, or one you actually possess and may reinstall on a new computer or hard drive?

Russ
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