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Author Topic: 1:32 Diorama  (Read 21118 times)
finescalerr
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« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2016, 04:45:57 PM »

I'm still fooling around with the shack. So far I like the original card structure better than the one I made from mystery wood (not basswood). Yesterday I found some cardstock I had printed eight years ago and, while it isn't exactly the weathered wood I had in mind, I built up a small wall section and photographed all three examples.

Starting from the left are 1.) stained card, 2.) printed card, and 3.) mystery wood I stained with acrylic gray.

The experiment will continue with stained basswood and different printed cardstock, this time with knots (if I can unclog my dormant inkjet printer).

Russ


* Three Materials.jpg (126.74 KB, 600x398 - viewed 864 times.)
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finescalerr
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« Reply #31 on: October 03, 2016, 04:05:05 PM »

Okay, this is my third attempt at building a 1:32 shack and making it look like REAL weathered cedar wood. I finally achieved what I've been trying to accomplish. -- Russ


* Third Try.jpg (159.88 KB, 650x405 - viewed 772 times.)
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #32 on: October 03, 2016, 10:58:32 PM »

Yes!!!  THAT looks real! Congrats, your perseverance has certainly paid off!
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Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakinís World
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« Reply #33 on: October 04, 2016, 05:56:47 AM »

'bout friggin' time!  Wink
Glad you didnt give up!
-Mj
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     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Bill Gill
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« Reply #34 on: October 04, 2016, 06:30:05 AM »

OK! That looks satisfactory.

Is it a photographic process that gave all the detailed knots and whatnots? Please share your technique.
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #35 on: October 04, 2016, 06:38:39 AM »

Russ that looks really nice.

You are going to do the rest of the building right?

Jerry
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Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
finescalerr
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« Reply #36 on: October 04, 2016, 12:00:56 PM »

Thanks, guys. Yes, I finally had to resort to photography. All attempts at creating miniature swirls, grain lines, knots, and coloration in miniature (after three months of trying) ended up as impressionistic approximations. I found a photo of the boards I wanted online and used Photoshop to weather them. (They started out a reddish-brown color.) I scaled them down to a ten scale inch width and used a pro quality inkjet photo printer to output the artwork on 0.012-inch thick art paper of the proper finish and texture.

Then I laminated the paper onto heavier cardstock, cut out the boards and bats, and built up the shack. It will be a reduced depth structure and will sit on the back corner of an 8" square base. The left wall is 2 inches deep and the right 1 inch. The window and roof are the next little projects.

I now have an entire junk box of weathered wood and stained/painted card that just didn't make the grade -- three months' work -- as well as two other 1:32 shacks (each without a roof and window), one of card, the other of wood.

There now is no question: I am clinically insane.

Russ
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EZnKY
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« Reply #37 on: October 04, 2016, 04:57:33 PM »

Well I love it!
The insanity is the point...
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Eric Zabilka
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« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2016, 12:45:24 AM »

The tries are decisive. Good job !
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #39 on: October 10, 2016, 10:36:01 AM »


I now have an entire junk box of weathered wood and stained/painted card that just didn't make the grade -- three months' work -- as well as two other 1:32 shacks (each without a roof and window), one of card, the other of wood.

There now is no question: I am clinically insane.

Russ

Maybe you should go back to publishing something you were very good at if not exceptional!!

Jerry
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Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
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« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2016, 11:51:53 AM »

Insanity is the act of doing something repeatedly and expecting different results. Grin
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« Reply #41 on: October 11, 2016, 12:08:55 PM »

Russ,

that looks good to me. Did you take the picture in another light constellation? It looks a bit overexposed and the shadows seem to be much harder than in the previous pictures. Well, printed stock: Why don't you dare to try to paint some wood like that? Might work ...

And I second what Jerry said  Cheesy.

Cheers,
Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
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« Reply #42 on: October 11, 2016, 12:37:20 PM »

It's just a quick iPhone shot, outdoors, late afternoon. That would account for the contrast.

As for painting, I spent two months trying to get decent results and failed. Over time I have learned I am better with computers than with a paintbrush, miniature table saw, machine tools, or a high level of artistry.

Russ
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« Reply #43 on: October 11, 2016, 01:41:37 PM »

If it looks the part I can't see anything wrong in using whatever technique there's available or someone is good at. What I thought about painting was indees imitating one special board. My only concern about the prints is color fading after some time. But I'm afraid I'm a bit old school at that and ink qualities and especially UV-resistant varnishes have improved ever since. I'd really like to see some more pictures taken in a less harsh light.

Cheers,
Volker
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I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Bill Gill
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« Reply #44 on: October 11, 2016, 03:56:30 PM »

I agree, the results are the goal, not the method. And your results look very good. But I too wonder about the lightfastness of the inks in general. Some Epson inks are listed as archival, others?Huh

Here's recent research on archival properties of inks:
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251484589_Light_Fastness_of_Pigment-based_and_Dye-based_Inkjet_Inks

Here is an Amazon listing for archival ink refills for Canon, Epson and HP printers
https://www.amazon.com/Archival-Ink-USA-Systems-Printers/dp/B004CCO8T6
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