Westlake Publishing Forums
July 08, 2020, 03:31:21 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:     REGARDING MEMBERSHIP ON THIS FORUM: Due to spam, our server has disabled the forum software to gain membership. The only way to become a new member is for you to send me a private e-mail with your preferred screen name (we prefer you use your real name, or some variant there-of), and email adress you would like to have associated with the account.  -- Send the information to:  Russ at finescalerr@msn.com
 
   Home   Help Search Login  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4
  Print  
Author Topic: SP Narrow Gauge #18  (Read 26950 times)
Dave Fischer
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 67


« on: September 27, 2015, 11:08:18 PM »

This is a project that keeps moving ahead despite my misgivings about its complexity-- I'm hoping that life will be long enough to see it finished! The word "loco" keeps coming to mind. Scale is 1/20 and it is mostly plastic and all scratch-- wheels, coupler(s), nuts and bolts, the works. Engine and tender will come to about 30" when finished. Lead truck, pilot and cylinders are done with the exception of a few details, and the smokebox and headlight are almost there-- I'm actually projecting about ten years to get it all done, but finishing one piece at a time seems to be keeping it interesting! By the way, the bent boiler tubes that make up the pilot might be the most difficult pieces I have tackled for a model. More to come!  DF


* sp18leadtr2.jpg (55.52 KB, 625x256 - viewed 1412 times.)

* sp18 leadtr.jpg (69.12 KB, 650x515 - viewed 1432 times.)
Logged
Dave Fischer
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 67


« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2015, 11:11:22 PM »

Here is the pilot.


* sp18pilot.jpg (88.55 KB, 750x519 - viewed 2746 times.)
Logged
Dave Fischer
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 67


« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2015, 11:14:21 PM »

AND a rear view of the cylinders. I guess I'll eventually figure out maximizing the number of photos I can post! 


* sp18cylinders.jpg (70.77 KB, 625x436 - viewed 1328 times.)
Logged
finescalerr
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5662


« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2015, 01:15:52 AM »

One of my favorite steam locos. You seem to be doing it justice. -- Russ
Logged
darrylhuffman
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 165


WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2015, 01:55:25 AM »

Unbelievable.

I am awestruck.

Can't wait to see the progress photos and hope I live long enough to see it completed.

#18 is one of my favorite engines as well.

Interesting page about it here:

http://carsoncolorado.com/history-of-18/
Logged

Darryl Huffman
darrylhuffman@yahoo.com
The search for someone else to blame is always succcessful.
Dave Fischer
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 67


« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2015, 02:43:25 AM »

Darryl-- The Carson Colorado website is what makes this project even remotely possible! I had actually started research in 1992 after seeing #18 in Independence and taking many pictures... not enough, however, to show everything that needed to be seen. With the restoration came photos of detail after detail that was hidden or unclear, and watching it all get put back together is the rarest of opportunities for any modeler! The restoration is of the highest quality and my hat is off to the crew in Independence-- the engine is supposed to be running next year.

Thanks, Russ, I'll try not to disappoint! And everyone else... don't miss that website-- there are photos on a gallery page as well as high-res stuff on each page of the restoration progress reports.
Logged
lab-dad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2083



« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2015, 05:46:24 AM »

Everything worth while takes time!
Looking forward to seeing this evolve.
Great job so far!
-Marty
Logged

     Martin G. Jones Photography
    Go not where the path leads
Go instead, where there is no path,
           And leave a trail
Bill Gill
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 962



« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2015, 06:57:41 AM »

Oh my goodness!
Logged
Hydrostat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 714



WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2015, 08:16:33 AM »



Dave,

phew, that looks so damn realistic. I especially like the coarse texture on the buffer beam beside the ball shaped immersion (for pushing beams?). Looks like old welding seams. And you're really sure you made this from plastic? Another nice detail is the missing rivet at one of the pilot's boiler tubes.

Volker
Logged

I'll make it. If I have to fly the five feet like a birdie.

I'll fly it. I'll make it.
Allan G
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 191


« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2015, 02:29:15 PM »

Dave; looks incredible! No rush to build something as special as this. Keep us posted.....Allan
Logged
Ray Dunakin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4191



WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2015, 09:22:28 PM »

Astounding! Looking at the photos, it's really hard to believe it's only 1/20th scale. It all looks much, much larger.

BTW, how did you do the lettering on the wheels?
« Last Edit: September 28, 2015, 11:35:49 PM by Ray Dunakin » Logged

Visit my website to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

Ray Dunakin’s World
Chuck Doan
Mr. Wizard
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2506



WWW
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2015, 10:15:13 PM »

Just beautiful Dave! At his rate, you will finish before I finish mine.
Logged

“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





http://public.fotki.com/ChuckDoan/model_projects/
Dave Fischer
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 67


« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2015, 02:11:04 AM »

Well thanks, all, for the encouragement! Now let me pass on some information...

When this engine was N.C.O. #11 it had a wooden pilot, and the one you see here was cobbled together in the SP shops when the engine was rebuilt. The pilot beam looks like it had lived a couple of lives before as there are holes drilled in many odd places and those weld scars on the front. The plan was to rivet the boiler tubes to the beam, but four of them conflicted with the bolts for the frame and they were simply welded at the top-- looks a bit messy, but couldn't be more interesting! The texture on the model beam is Squadron green filler putty thinned with liquid styrene cement and stippled into the surface of the styrene beam with a stiff brush. Many of the rough parts looked very green before they were painted.

The lettering on the wheels involved several steps-- I traced the type from a good, flat side-view photo of the wheel, inked it and cleaned it up. This is where my old-school graphic design experience has come through! The art went to a photoengraver (another near-extinct profession) who etched a zinc plate with the letters cut .015" into the surface. Heated plastic sprue was pressed into the depressed letters one-at-a-time and the resulting raised version carefully shaved off and glued to the styrene wheel. This became the master for a mold, and four wheels were cast in epoxy. I'll get a diagram together that shows the whole process-- it's not as bad as it sounds, and the crossed eyes go back in a few days...

Chuck-- Last one across the line takes the prize. Ready? GO!
Logged
1-32
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 832


Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2015, 03:48:31 AM »

i really like the paint finish-tar and oil most realistic.
kind regards kim
Logged
Bill Gill
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 962



« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2015, 04:54:11 AM »

Dave, The fact that the very first images of your build show components complete, painted and weathered create an irrepressible indelible mental impression that they are truly real. Even if you subsequently post in-progress photos of bright white styrene, pockmarked with Squadron Green, my brain will always see steel, assuming perhaps it is covered with white and green paint, but steel.  Magnificent!
« Last Edit: September 30, 2015, 05:03:47 AM by Bill Gill » Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!