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Author Topic: SP Narrow Gauge #18  (Read 28049 times)
michael mott
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« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2016, 12:18:24 PM »

Quote
By the way, Airfix came to Tucson late in 1959, and the bagged kits in Series One cost exactly what I got as a weekly allowance,

Dave I meant to say Bag as well, it was in the days when everything was behind the counter.  I think the first one I did was the DH4 and the Lysander and the Supermarine Racer stand out in my mind as well.

Michael
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Dave Fischer
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« Reply #31 on: April 05, 2016, 01:16:16 AM »

Here is a shot of the frame as it comes together. No paint until some other pieces get built and stuck on, so it's a good time to see what's underneath. The snazzy two-tone sides are a result of a brown sheet and a white one totaling EXACTLY .150" thick (3 scale inches) when laminated together, as styrene sheet never seems to be the thickness it is supposed to be. The vertical black pieces are the glides for the driver bearing boxes, one of which appears to the right, and the U-shaped pieces connect the boxes to the leaf springs that don't exist just yet. The frame sides are textured with liquid cement pushed around with an old brush to break up the surface and they look a bit dirty as a result. Note that the cross-members were bolted to the sides and then welded in place-- very solid construction!

I've included the second photo to show my experimental elevated work space, based on a similar set-up I saw in an optometrist's lab many years ago. The 11"x 9" glass top is raised 4" above the tool bins below, which keeps the by-products of creation from pushing into the work space and keeps the tools organized and easy to locate, but very close and visible. So far it is working great!


* frame3.jpg (100.52 KB, 800x600 - viewed 1090 times.)
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Dave Fischer
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« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2016, 01:20:01 AM »

OOPS! Well, that seems to be the second photo... imagine THIS one first!


* frame1.jpg (69.07 KB, 800x600 - viewed 1093 times.)
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lab-dad
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« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2016, 05:33:56 AM »

Looking good!
I wonder why styrene is not "exactly" what they say?
Must be like everything else; "thats close enough..."

I like the elevated work surface. May have to try that.
Seems like we always end up with a 12" square of working space anyway.
Making the bottom open (at the front) would allow one to have even more crap out just under the surface!

-Marty
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #34 on: April 05, 2016, 07:32:08 AM »

Nice work!
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Dave Fischer
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« Reply #35 on: April 05, 2016, 09:05:36 AM »

Marty-- I'm glad styrene is NOT always exact as it comes... I find that I use a particularly thick or thin piece all the time when matching a scale thickness or laminating layers to a specific height. In fact, the bin on the left of my raised work table is reserved for useful pieces of plastic or wire so they can be found again!

You have hit the nail on the head about the ACTUAL amount of work space we use-- a square foot was my standard as well. As I got deeper into the smaller parts I was making, I realized that a little 2"x 3" piece of glass I was assembling pieces on was my WHOLE work area. Everything else was a churning sea of big and little tools, scrap plastic and static-charged shavings. Then I remembered that optometrist's lab...
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finescalerr
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« Reply #36 on: April 05, 2016, 12:19:20 PM »

I'm glad to see you back at work on that model. -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #37 on: April 05, 2016, 10:17:50 PM »

Me too!

Nice idea for the work space. I often have to resist a violent, clearing sweep of my arm when things get too crowded. 
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Dave Fischer
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« Reply #38 on: May 29, 2016, 01:19:27 AM »

Well, this may seem a very small step, but I have been sweating the construction of suitable valve handles for YEARS, and am very happy with this solution. Where most have a solid outer rim and are cast in epoxy from built-up styrene masters, one sits prominently on top of the steam dome like the Crown Jewel and was built from styrene with a cut-away rim to match the distinctive shape and style of the original. The process was long and involved, but I can lay out the details if anyone is feeling crazy enough to want to give it a try... More when I get my eyes uncrossed!   DF


* valve handle1.jpg (59.76 KB, 216x191 - viewed 775 times.)

* valve handle2.jpg (56.11 KB, 216x196 - viewed 799 times.)
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #39 on: May 29, 2016, 05:19:47 AM »

That's magnificent! Since I model in HO it would also be impossible, but, put me down for one who'd like to learn how you did it!
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finescalerr
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« Reply #40 on: May 29, 2016, 12:26:52 PM »

It must have taken a few days to create that beauty. -- Russ
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Hydrostat
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« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2016, 12:35:40 PM »

Phew, I love that. Please tell us how you did it. It would be interesting to see some bigger/higher resoluted pics of it.

Cheers,
Volker
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« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2016, 12:50:33 PM »

I also think it looks so well made, I also would like to know how it was produced.
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #43 on: May 29, 2016, 07:38:43 PM »

Yes, tell us more! That is a very intricate shape. Congratulations!
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #44 on: May 29, 2016, 08:04:00 PM »

Stunning! I too would be interested in how you made it.
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