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Author Topic: The SketchUp Plymouth DL  (Read 27794 times)
finescalerr
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« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2015, 01:05:53 AM »

I think it will fit, Marty. The frame is about 150 inches long in 1:1 or something over 9 inches in 1:16. -- Russ
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« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2015, 12:01:49 AM »

Russ,

It looks pretty acceptable.

I agree with Chuck, do it as one piece. I don't see any reason to have it in multiple pieces (other than for possible print orientation).

Those tiny "cross-pins" in the side-frame bolts....or whatever those are, definitely wont print well. O would also consider leaving those same round bolts/fasteners off completely, (they are round and very visible...and will be tough to clean)..and instead just do recessed round holes in the side-frame, where one can insert styrene or brass rod to make those fasteners.

I would recommend not doing the frames as a solid....on the large scale especially, but even on the 1/32, the cost of the printing resin will kill you. I would instead some kind of a raised reinforcing grid/structure/web to prevent wall deformation.
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finescalerr
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« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2015, 01:08:22 AM »

Thanks for the feedback. I will make the adjustments to the final drawing. Those "cross pins" seem to be rotating fasteners to hold the hood in place. Most such locos soon lost the hood but the fasteners remained. -- Russ
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« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2015, 05:32:58 PM »

It took forever but I finally finished the radiator. (I am very clumsy with SketchUp.) -- Russ


* Plymouth DL 1a.jpeg (88.33 KB, 1280x731 - viewed 566 times.)
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« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2015, 02:01:26 AM »


  Only with Sketchup HuhHuh??  Wink Wink
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« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2015, 06:38:24 AM »

Looking damn sweet!!!!!

What happened inside the frame? you filled it in!?!?!

The lines on the radius areas of the side-frames will need to be erased too (I think)

Will the radiator be a separate part? (please)
And the guard?
What will the core be? printed? separate? mesh?...Huh

-Marty
« Last Edit: May 28, 2015, 06:41:55 AM by lab-dad » Logged

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« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2015, 01:03:52 PM »

I temporarily put a "deck" between the side frames but will open up the center when I figure out how Plymouth actually built the loco's engine compartment. That filled-in section is on the same layer as the radiator. The idea would be to create the frame as one part, the radiator as another, the hood another, and the cab (or cab walls) yet another (presumably with positionable doors).

The radiator guard might be too fragile to print separately or even at all. The 1:1 scale strips that make it up are only about 1 1/4 inches deep by 3/16 thick. I'm sure one of the guys will help us with that issue.

The radiator core is recessed. The idea would be to cut a screen to fit the recess. It would be much too fine to print.

These sub-assemblies are actually a "rough draft". Some "correct" dimensions will have to be enlarged prior to printing and some details created by hand. It might also be necessary to break down the "kit" into more sub-assemblies. Once the drawing is finished, our panel of experts will help turn it into a kit.

Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2015, 09:14:25 PM »

Very neat stuff you guys are doing.  Russ, really good to see your work. Both of you get your merit badges!
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« Reply #23 on: June 01, 2015, 10:18:11 PM »

Here's the basic Plymouth DL drawing. It's 1:1 and many parts are one inch across, probably too small to print in 1:32. I will create a "kit" by breaking down the drawing, modifying whatever is necessary, and preparing it for print.

Marty and I will collaborate but we need a lot of help from you geniuses. For example, we'd need to know the best way to break down the model into printable sub-assemblies, what parts we must make by hand, how to create those little hood stanchions where the "cylinder" is 1 inch diameter and the "handle" is about 3/8-inch, whether the nuts and bolts will print properly (some will be pretty tiny), and a million other things.

Anyway, it's a start ... and long overdue.

Russ


* Plymouth DL 3-4.jpeg (29.85 KB, 407x329 - viewed 512 times.)

* Plymouth DL 3-4 Rear.jpeg (26.33 KB, 423x329 - viewed 504 times.)

* Plymouth DL Front.jpeg (21.67 KB, 265x329 - viewed 499 times.)

* Plymouth DL Side.jpeg (34.77 KB, 576x329 - viewed 497 times.)
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 01:09:49 AM by finescalerr » Logged
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« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2015, 10:36:14 PM »

Looking good!
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« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2015, 08:13:57 AM »

That looks GREAT!
I think the "details" should be separate and just dimples for their location.
Even in 1/16 I would install them as separate parts.

I think it is time to start a separate thread for this project.

Lots of the strapping could be fab'd out of strip stock.

-Marty
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« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2015, 08:52:41 PM »

That is such a good looking locomotive. Great job bringing it to life.

I would do the frame as a one piece assy and the rest probably like Grandt did his Plymouth.

The cab needs to be thought of for interior painting. Maybe make interior angle iron corners so the pieces could be joined after painting with hidden joints?

I would choose a test scale and try a piece with most of the detail on it to see how well it will print. Maybe just one frame side or the radiator. One test is worth a hundred guesses, and then you will know if adding details might be better. Besides, it is pretty neat to get your first print back.

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« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2015, 09:12:56 PM »



Consider this an R and D project. You will not get it right the first time. Once you get the parts back you will start to see other, hopefully better ways to do it. When I did my first frame, I left off the gussets thinking they would be too thin. As soon as I got the frame I realized it was going to be a challenge to glue thin gussets on with enough strength. So I made a new frame with the gussets...much better, and stronger too. I also realized I should have cast each of my pedestals and journal boxes as a single part instead of 3 pieces. The beauty is that you haven't spent hours fabricating, and just redo it and print again. 

 
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« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2015, 03:30:41 PM »

Well I received the files from Russ yesterday and have been playing around and thinking..........

I took all his hard work apart  Roll Eyes
And now have just the frame.

I also changed the protruding rods to indentations for pins out of other material.
I have concerns for the thin cross section on the tops of the frame and between the big bolts. I wonder if these would even print in 1/32?
In addition I added angular support pieces from the sides to the ends, just didnt look like enough "meat" there for me.
And I deepened the recess for the axles - I'm planning on brass/bronze bearings in there eventually.

I have also mentioned using sheet material for the cab.
I dont think a "printed" cab would be a scale thickness and if it was i doubt it would stay flat. For those who want to build one in 1/32 may be they can get together and have a cab done from photoetch. I will scratch mine. Shocked

I still want to see what we can do about removing material from the printed sides to save in printing costs - I was thinking removing an area equivalent to a styrene "C" channel?

Definitely need to put this thing on weight watchers!
For giggles I uploaded it to shapeways
In frosted ultra detail it is $679.00! (1/16th scale = 9.23" long)
Too big for extreme.

Thats enough for now, sorry it was so long winded...........

-Marty


* frame only rev1.1.jpg (182 KB, 1226x555 - viewed 398 times.)
« Last Edit: June 04, 2015, 04:33:16 PM by lab-dad » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2015, 08:59:43 PM »

Ouch! The later Grandt Plymouth frames also has the insides thinned out. Might consider allowing for a piece(s) of brass shape that could glue in for stiffening. Then glue a thin piece of styrene or even a printed profile that would make the frames look like a solid thickness and fill the joint. Maybe make the journal parts separate so they could be printed in the extreme detail. Like a cover and not actually doing any hard work.

The frame I showed earlier was about 40 bucks in FUD. 2.5" x 7".  The cab walls would not be hard to make out of sheet styrene, and photo-etch sounds interesting too.
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