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Author Topic: 2 Foot gauge tractor loco in 1/16th scale  (Read 64501 times)
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #90 on: November 22, 2015, 09:04:39 PM »

Good job on that frame.
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Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #91 on: November 23, 2015, 01:07:21 AM »

looking good chuck but will it work.
kind regards kim
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« Reply #92 on: November 23, 2015, 02:05:53 AM »

I'm glad you are back at the bench and look forward to watching all this come together. -- Russ
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« Reply #93 on: November 23, 2015, 06:46:30 AM »

Great solution!
I like what you did.
Very accurate dimensions too and plenty strong now.

-Mj
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Bill Gill
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« Reply #94 on: November 23, 2015, 06:51:36 AM »

That's a nice beam, but i'm impressed with the strength of that toothpick! Smiley Good to see this project again.
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« Reply #95 on: November 30, 2015, 06:51:48 AM »

Very good DIY solution with the beams - I'm looking forward to your progress. I think it would have been a bit difficult to mill the profile's sloped shoulders and fillets, unless there's a 5-axis machining center available.

Cheers,
Volker
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« Reply #96 on: November 30, 2015, 09:44:02 AM »

Nice job Chuck.  Looks really good and glad your leaving the yacht and girls alone for the winter.

Wait a minute you don't have winter there!!!

Jerry
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« Reply #97 on: December 02, 2015, 08:05:48 AM »

Hi Chuck

I love you "DIY solution" with the beams. What a result with basic modeling techniques!

All seemed well, but once I started cleaning the wax off, it began bowing and yawning enough to convince me the FUD material was too unstable to use.

I am a bit anxious now as my Transmission wheels (In fact, Volker created them!) are the same FUD material. Is there a risk that they will behave in the same manner one day? Undecided

One more question to your JB Weld fillets:
When I had to fill up panel lines to engrave them anew, I had to learn that the filler should have about the same consistence as the surrounding matrerial.  This was the key for smooth surfaces. Up to this day I used SuperGlue with Baking Soda. Now, would that mean, your JB Weld is about equally hard as Styrene Huh

Thanks, Peter
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« Reply #98 on: December 02, 2015, 08:12:38 AM »

Peter,
Not to hijack Chucks thread but in my opinion the JB weld is darn close to styrene as far as hardness. I have used both quite a bit but never together - yet!
If it is critical you could always use styrene softened  in solvent for the filler.

Mj
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« Reply #99 on: December 02, 2015, 03:52:25 PM »

Thanks Jerry, I will try to dream about the girls and the yacht tonight and remind them.

Peter, I don't think you will have any trouble. My frame was 2.5 x 6.8 inches and the sections were very thin. I have not had any issues with FUD parts otherwise. I just pushed the envelope a bit too far this time.

I used the JB just as a test, and it worked fine. But I wasn't trying to re-work anything afterwards, so I don't know how well it might re-scribe. I have used it to build up shapes, but I haven't cut into it. Might be kind of crumbly in thin sections.

I will write up what I did, it required virtually no re-work after application. It does seem to stick to styrene; I tried soda-blasting the fillets and they stayed fine.


« Last Edit: December 02, 2015, 03:54:58 PM by Chuck Doan » Logged

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« Reply #100 on: December 02, 2015, 04:32:52 PM »

Last year I experimented with making rivet heads by applying tiny dots of thick CA onto barely marked location dimples on the side of a pair of HO flatcars. The technique worked fairly well. More recently I experimented using JB Weld instead and when the timing was right, the method worked even better because the JB Weld was more viscous and stayed in place better. There are a couple rivet heads that spread out a little in both cases. The CA is very brittle and really hard to clean up. I haven't tried gently scraping away the excess JB Weld yet. The rivets are very small and might just pop off the styrene. Fortunately the piece represents old rolling stock and a couple mashed rivets don't look out of place. However, Some day i will make a test strip of rivets on some scrap styrene and see how ell the JB Weld can be reshaped when that small.
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #101 on: December 02, 2015, 08:31:19 PM »

The JB weld is easy to scrape or sand. I often use the 5 minute version for minor fills. I used the regular stuff for my fillets so I would have lots of time to work it. As Bill says it is viscous and I had no spreading after my fillets were formed.
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« Reply #102 on: December 05, 2015, 08:24:20 PM »



The prototype frame is welded together, so I started testing some ideas for weld seams. As I had successfully used JB weld for my fillets, I decided to try it for welds.

So far: Apply with a small brush (brush can be cleaned with acetone) along desired seam. Let it set for approx. 3 hours and then work with a tool made from brass tubing. The JB weld is very forgiving and it can be pushed around with a sharp toothpick to even up/form the edges.

This is a test frame. I gave it a quick coat of black primer. Macro shots taken from 1/2" away. Looks promising so far.


Press lightly into seam with the cut side down.


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« Reply #103 on: December 05, 2015, 08:41:56 PM »

That looks friggin awesome!!!!!!!
Marty
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #104 on: December 06, 2015, 12:42:41 AM »

Ok, I actually thought those were shots of the prototype welds, and wondered for a moment what happened to the shots of the model! Yes, it looks that real!


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