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Author Topic: Glover Machine Works 2-6-0 in 1/16 scale  (Read 46388 times)
lab-dad
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« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2014, 06:18:29 AM »

Thanks for the review Gordon!
Off to Amazon................
-Mj
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TRAINS1941
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« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2014, 02:53:49 PM »

Nice so far but you already know that.  That book sounds interesting.

Jerry
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Why isn't there mouse-flavored cat food?
George Carlin
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« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2014, 08:21:23 PM »

The Core (for the Water Tank)
I used 1/8” and 3/4” basswood I cut all the pieces to height on my table-saw so that all the pieces be the same. Then each piece is roughly cut to length and then trued up on the disk-sander. On the ends of the pieces that goes next to the tubing, I sanded a bevel to match. I cut two 1” and two 7/8” pieces of tubing to the height, and with the aid of a scale drawing, glued all the pieces together. I then true up the top and bottom on the disk-sander.

The Wrapping

I start with  0.040 (or larger) thick styrene for the top and bottom. I will cut slightly larger and glue to the finished core. Using a sanding stick I sand the edge to be flush with the core sides and then round off the outside edge all the way around the tank.

For the wrap on the sides I cut 0.020 styrene sheet to the correct height and glue to the core, leaving the edge of the top and bottom wrap uncovered. Now that the core is covered the rest of the detail can be added.

The Frame

I went with a metal frame instead of a wood frame. I used 3/8” channel from northeastern scale models for the sills, center sills and end beams. Styrene was used for most of the other parts. I think the wheel-sets are from Simpson I cut the axle in half and used a piece of tubing to make it the right gauge. I used set screws to represent the springs

https://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/14155739818/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/14341604214/


Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2014, 10:06:23 PM »

That tender is a masterful piece of work!
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Ray Dunakin’s World
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Hi, I'm Kim.


« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2014, 12:54:32 AM »

gordon
the detail of the little handles the loco side of the tender is really well done love them.
regards kim
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finescalerr
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« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2014, 01:42:57 AM »

I'm kind of partial to the photo of those four little rascals in the kitchen. -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2014, 06:16:14 PM »

That tender is cute, but in a good way.
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“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





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SandiaPaul
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« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2014, 03:59:08 AM »

"set screws to represent springs"

Excellent idea and they look just like springs. One of my big model railroad pet peeves....the horrible real springs that are used.

Also...I got lost in your flickr page....where did the time go???

Paul
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Paul
ron knepp
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« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2014, 06:47:31 AM »



Hi Gordon,

Are there any updates on the Glover engine?

Ron Knepp
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Scratchman
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« Reply #24 on: August 08, 2014, 07:38:03 PM »

Heres the two photos in reply #17









Thanks guys for your comments. Kim, the water valves are castings from Trackside Details. The two domes, bell, stack, stack base whistle, number-board and pop valves are also castings from Trackside Details. Before I add the ash-pan detail to the bottom of the fire box, I build a jig-base on a 8”x10” piece of plywood with a sheet of graph paper glued on to the top surface I will line up and level the boiler on this surface. I first added the rear section of the frame to the boiler. With the boiler setting on the jig-base I joined the two parts with the frame setting on temporary spacer blocks added to the jig-base to keep the assembly true and level on the boiler. Now I add jig pieces to hold the boiler to the jig and spacer blocks to hold the cab floor on both sides On this the cab floor and walls can be added to the boiler. For the running boards I added spacer blocks at both the front and rear to hold them at the right location so the braces can be marked and added. One more item for this jig are the two rear cab supports. The cab spacer blocks needs to be cut off a small amount at the rear to make room or the two supports. After these are added the jig the can be discarded and I can start adding the rest of the detail.

Trackside Details Domes: Three sizes 1”, 1-1/8”, and 1-1/4” . I used the two larger sizes. They worked very will on my 2-5/16” diameter boiler.






Gordon Birrell

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gordonbirrell/
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 08:36:25 AM by Scratchman » Logged
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2014, 09:19:00 PM »

Looking good! Those Trackside Detail parts are really nice.
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Ray Dunakin’s World
ron knepp
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« Reply #26 on: August 09, 2014, 08:55:56 AM »



Thanks for the update Gordon, I really like your
assembly jig.

Ron Knepp
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finescalerr
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« Reply #27 on: August 09, 2014, 11:40:11 AM »

Prediction: It's going to be a gem. -- Russ
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2014, 09:32:07 PM »

I concur Mon Uncle!
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“They're most important to me. Most important. All the little details.” -Joseph Cotten, Shadow of a Doubt





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billmart
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« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2014, 01:58:22 PM »

Gordon -

It's a pleasure to see how you go about creating your outstanding models.  I work a lot with styrene and I'm a big believer in drilling jigs, assembly jigs, etc., but you've taken that to a whole new level with this build.

Bill Martinsen
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