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Author Topic: Glover Machine Works 2-6-0 in 1/16 scale  (Read 37882 times)
Scratchman
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« on: May 08, 2014, 05:55:39 PM »

Glover Machine Works 2-6-0 in 1/16 scale

Three-foot gauge 2-6-0. The drawings are in the March-April 1998 Gazette. The drawings are good with both side elevations on the engine a top view and all four elevations on the tender all four elevations on the cab and boiler, along with three cross sections and a clear look at the side frame.  There’s no drawing on the back-head or inside the cab detail, but it does show the locations of the different pipes and levers  going into the cab. There's no brake detail except the shoes that are on the back side of the flanged drivers. The drawings are in 3/8 scale, half the size of my model. I always make a working drawing for all my modeling projects. Before starting work I took a large sheet of graph paper and drew up a simple scale drawing.

With the locomotive being on display in Atlanta, I was hoping there would be a photo or two on the web, but haven't found much. In TimberTimes Issue 54, the article “The Little Loggers out of Marietta” has five catalog illustrations of five different little Glover locomotives and a brief history of the company. I'm also going to buy the book “Glover Steam Locomotives: The South's Last Steam Builder” and see what's there.

Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2014, 07:03:19 PM »

Oh boy, another fun Scratchman build!
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2014, 10:03:43 PM »

That is an excellent book Gordon, you will enjoy it I'm sure.
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« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2014, 06:04:52 AM »

Great! Grin
Looking forward to this build.
I saw the Glovers in the TT and really liked them.
Guess now I will have something to follow if I build one (in brass). Wink
Keep 'em coming!
-Marty
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finescalerr
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« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2014, 12:18:44 PM »

I have a book about Glover Loco Works with a lot of good photos. Two show a couple of U.S. Navy switchers in San Diego circa 1915. I drew plans based on the larger Grandt 1:48 Porter kit and Richard Christ and I cobbled up this close copy of the Navy engines in 1:32n2. Due to a rare lapse in my good taste the clunky cab differs from those of the actual engines and, as with my 8 ton Grandt Porter, the frame is bowed. Even brass stiffeners were of no use. That flaw spoiled both models.

Drivers by Terry Van Winkle.

Glover built some nice stuff.

Russ


* Glover 132 Loco Front.jpg (75.38 KB, 1024x646 - viewed 2064 times.)
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 12:20:45 PM by finescalerr » Logged
Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2014, 07:42:41 PM »

Nice model Russ, despite the not-exactly-noticeable flaws.

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Scratchman
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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2014, 12:04:48 PM »

Thanks, Russ for the photo of your little loco. My copy of the book will be here at the first of next week, I hope it will be helpful for this project.

Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Scratchman
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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2014, 11:30:59 PM »




LARGE SCALE STYRENE BOILERS

Most of the modeling on this thread will be in 1:16 scale but the technique can be used on some of the smaller scales as well.
The way I go about building scale boilers is a core and wrap technique. I will wrap thin styrene sheet around a core shape of the boiler. I don't do any of the wrapping until the first 4 parts of the core is complete.

Plastruct Tubing

 Traditional ABS Round Tubing from Plastruct. "Code TB" this tube runs from 1-1/2" to 6" O.D.. I at 1/4” intervals 



The Core (for the boiler)

Part #1: For the boiler I will use a piece of tubing or some type of pipe. I will use the closest size to the smallest diameter size needed on that particular boiler. I cut the tubing on my 8” cut off saw with a 8-1/4” finishing Blade 40 Carbide teeth. I cut a little longer than is needed and  I then use my 10” disk sander to size and square up the ends.

Part #2: For the bottom of the fire box I  build a box out of  basswood. I fit the two parts together keeping the two parts flush at the back of the boiler. On a piece of graph paper I will draw a cross section of the two parts and use it to line up the two parts when gluing them together. Now that the two part are joined I use my 10 inch disk sander to true the back of the two parts.

Part #3: For the front of the fire box I built a wood carving 1/4” thick and glue to the front of  #2

Part #4: For the back-head I build a wood carving 1/4” thick and glue to the back of #1 and #2

Part #5: For the smoke box front I build a two styrene disk, an inner disk that fits inside of the front of part #1, and a face disk that either fits inside or outside the smoke-box wrapping on the front of part #1

Photo #1
At the bottom is the core of the Glover water tank along with the top and bottom parts of the wrapping. These  are added to the core and shaped before adding the side parts of the wrapping.
At the top is the five parts of the boiler core for the Glover. Next to that is the five core parts for my Aussie loco #1. My Aussie loco #2 has all the wrapping parts and I have started adding detail. On the top far right is the first wrapping for part #1 The short boiler front shows the smoke-box front inside the smoke-box wrapping on the front of part #1 and the two parts to it's left are stack posts. These items are for a SBS that I will do later.
 


Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/








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Scratchman
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« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2014, 11:38:19 PM »

Photo #2
This photo shows the wrapping for the Glover. First I wrapped part #1 starting at the front and stopping at the front of the fire box Part #3 over this I added two layers of 1/4” X 040 styrene at the front and back of the lagged area. Between the styrene strips I added painters tape to level in the void. Over this I added a top and bottom piece of formed styrene sheet with a seam 90 degrees down from the top on both sides. There's no lagging inside the cab so all I had to do is wrap a piece of styrene sheet from the bottom of the fire-box over the top, down to the bottom of the fire-box on the other side. I added a styrene sheet on the bottom of the fire-box to this the ash pan will be added. I also added a thin styrene sheet over the face of  parts #3 and #4 and blend the edge so it will look like one piece. This gives a better surface to glue on the detail. 



Gordon Birrell
http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/


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Scratchman
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« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2014, 11:41:39 PM »

Photo #3   
This photo shows how I joined the top and bottom of the outer layer over the lagged area. First I glued the top piece to the 1/4” strips. Along the seam of the two halves I added a styrene spline piece 005 X 1”. The spline is glued to the under-side of the top half and then glued to the painter tape. Now you have good base to add the bottom piece. Also in this photo is the start of my drawings (note) on the blown-up drawings the cross section of the boiler and fire-box. This was used  to keep parts #1 and #2 lined up when gluing them together. When the core is finished I can set the back-head on the cross-section and mark the top, bottom and two sides. Now the boiler is ready to start adding detail.



Gordon Birrell

http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Ray Dunakin
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« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2014, 12:07:20 AM »

Great stuff! I like hearing what kind of tools you used to get the large tubes cut and the ends squared.

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finescalerr
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« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2014, 01:42:35 AM »

I look forward to seeing what kind of magic you perform on this model. -- Russ
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Malachi Constant
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« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2014, 01:48:43 AM »

Thanks, Russ for the photo of your little loco. My copy of the book will be here at the first of next week, I hope it will be helpful for this project.

Gordon Birrell
The Glover book will make you want to build a bunch of locos!  Looking forward to your efforts on this one. -- Dallas
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Scratchman
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« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2014, 09:57:26 PM »

I got my copy of the book “Glover Steam Locomotives: The South's Last Steam Builder” and Dallas, you are right. I would like to build a bunch of Glover locos, but there are no plans out there and the surviving locos are few and far between. The plans in the Gazette are good as I stated above, but it is too bad that Al never had a little more time and information to have improved on these drawings. Russ, you are right, those little naval engines are way cool, along with almost every engine in the book. The book is going to be very helpful for my project. And for the machine shop modeler there are a lot of good photos and information. I wish I had added this book to my library a long time ago.

Gordon Birrell
http://www.flickr.com/photos/77318580@N00/
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Chuck Doan
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« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2014, 10:00:26 PM »

I agree, I found the Glover machine shop pictures very helpful when I was building my shop.
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